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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology

The Intermediate Filament Protein, Synemin, Is An Akap In The Heart, Mary Russell, Linda M. Lund, Roy Haber, Kathleen Mckeegan, Nicholas Cianciola, Meredith Bond Dec 2006

The Intermediate Filament Protein, Synemin, Is An Akap In The Heart, Mary Russell, Linda M. Lund, Roy Haber, Kathleen Mckeegan, Nicholas Cianciola, Meredith Bond

Biological Sciences Publications

Targeting of protein kinase A (PKA) by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) contributes to high specificity of PKA signaling pathways. PKA phosphorylation of myofilament and cytoskeletal proteins may regulate myofibrillogenesis and myocyte remodeling during heart disease; however, known cardiac AKAPs do not localize to these regions. To identify novel AKAPs which target PKA to the cytoskeleton or myofilaments, a human heart cDNA library was screened and the intermediate filament (IF) protein, synemin, was identified as a putative RII (PKA regulatory subunit type II) binding protein. A predicted RII binding region was mutated and resulted in loss of RII binding. Furthermore, synemin ...


A Phylogenetic Analysis Of The Correlates Of Sleep In Birds, Timothy Roth, John Lesku, Charles Amlaner, Steven Lima Nov 2006

A Phylogenetic Analysis Of The Correlates Of Sleep In Birds, Timothy Roth, John Lesku, Charles Amlaner, Steven Lima

Charles J. Amlaner

Quantitative comparative studies of sleep have focused exclusively on mammals. Such studies have repeatedly found strong relationships between the time spent in various sleep states and constitutive variables related to morphology, physiology, and life history. These studies influenced the development of several prominent hypotheses for the functions of sleep, but the applicability of these patterns and hypotheses to non-mammalian taxa is unclear. Here, we present the first quantitative analysis of sleep in a non-mammalian taxon (birds), focusing on the daily amount of time spent in slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep as determined by electrophysiological methods. We examined ...


Single Molecule Detection Systems And Methods, John G. K. Williams, Gregory R. Bashford Oct 2006

Single Molecule Detection Systems And Methods, John G. K. Williams, Gregory R. Bashford

Biomedical Imaging and Biosignal Analysis Laboratory

A micofluidic system is provided that includes a substrate, a first microchannel disposed in the substrate for providing a reactant to a reaction zone, a second microchannel disposed in the substrate, the third microchannel providing fluid communication between the first and second microchannels. The system also typically includes first and second electrodes, positioned at opposite ends of the second microchannel, for providing an electric field within the second microchannel. In operation, when the reactant is in the reaction zone, a reaction product is produced having a net electric charge different from the electric of the reactant.


A Phylogenetic Analysis Of Sleep Architecture In Mammals: The Integration Of Anatomy, Physiology, And Ecology, John Lesku, Timothy Roth, Charles Amlaner, Steven Lima Sep 2006

A Phylogenetic Analysis Of Sleep Architecture In Mammals: The Integration Of Anatomy, Physiology, And Ecology, John Lesku, Timothy Roth, Charles Amlaner, Steven Lima

Charles J. Amlaner

Among mammalian species, the time spent in the two main "architectural" states of sleep-slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep-varies greatly. Previous comparative studies of sleep architecture found that larger mammals, those with bigger brains, and those with higher absolute basal metabolic rates (BMR) tended to engage in less SWS and REM sleep. Species experiencing a greater risk of predation also exhibited less SWS and REM sleep. In all cases, however, these studies lacked a formal phylogenetic and theoretical framework and used mainly correlational analyses. Using independent contrasts and an updated data set, we extended existing approaches with path analysis ...


Activation In Neural Networks Controlling Ingestive Behaviors: What Does It Mean, And How Do We Map And Measure It?, Alan G. Watts, Arshad M. Khan, Graciela Sanchez-Watts, Dawna Salter, Christina M. Neuner Apr 2006

Activation In Neural Networks Controlling Ingestive Behaviors: What Does It Mean, And How Do We Map And Measure It?, Alan G. Watts, Arshad M. Khan, Graciela Sanchez-Watts, Dawna Salter, Christina M. Neuner

Arshad M. Khan, Ph.D.

No abstract provided.


Biochemical Characterization Of The Major Sorghum Grain Peroxidase, Mamoudou H. Dicko, Harry Gruppen, Riet Hilhorst, Alphons G. J. Voragen, Willen W. H. Van Berkel Apr 2006

Biochemical Characterization Of The Major Sorghum Grain Peroxidase, Mamoudou H. Dicko, Harry Gruppen, Riet Hilhorst, Alphons G. J. Voragen, Willen W. H. Van Berkel

Pr. Mamoudou H. DICKO, PhD

The major cationic peroxidase in sorghum grain (SPC4) , which is ubiquitously present in all sorghum varieties was purified to apparent homogeneity, and found to be a highly basic protein (pI #1;11). MS analysis showed that SPC4 consists of two glycoforms with molecular masses of 34227 and 35629 Da and it contains a type-b heme. Chemical deglycosylation allowed to estimate sugar contents of 3.0% and 6.7% (w ⁄ w) in glycoform I and II, respectively, and a mass of the apoprotein of 33 246 Da. High performance anion exchange chromatography allowed to determine the carbohydrate constituents of the polysaccharide ...


The Study Of Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression, Function, And Regulation In The Renal Vasculature During Postnatal Renal Development, Brian Blake Ratliff Apr 2006

The Study Of Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression, Function, And Regulation In The Renal Vasculature During Postnatal Renal Development, Brian Blake Ratliff

Theses and Dissertations in Biomedical Sciences

The newborn kidney is vulnerable to vasomotor acute renal failure (ARF) from adverse perinatal events or complications of prematurity. Nitric oxide (NO) vasodilation is vitally protective in this type of ARF, but its relationship with other vasoactive factors, such as angiotensin II (AII) has not been examined. In the immature kidney, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms, specifically eNOS and nNOS, are developmentally regulated, but their specific role and regulation are unknown.

The enhanced vasodilatory role of NO in the immature kidney was hypothesized to be attributed to regulatory, expressional, and functional differences in eNOS and nNOS isoforms from the adult ...


Asynchronous Eye Closure As An Anti-Predator Behavior In The Western Fence Lizard (Sceloporus Occidentalis), Christian Mathews, John Lesku, Stephen Lima, Charles Amlaner Feb 2006

Asynchronous Eye Closure As An Anti-Predator Behavior In The Western Fence Lizard (Sceloporus Occidentalis), Christian Mathews, John Lesku, Stephen Lima, Charles Amlaner

Charles J. Amlaner

Asynchronous eye closure (ASEC), one eye open while the other is closed, is a behavior observed in birds, some aquatic mammals, and reptiles. In birds and aquatic mammals, ASEC is associated with unihemispheric sleep wherein the cerebral hemisphere contralateral to (i.e. neurologically connected to) the closed eye sleeps while the other cerebral hemisphere remains awake with its associated eye open and functional. Evidence from birds suggests that ASEC is an important anti-predator adaptation to mediate the trade-off between the need to remain vigilant and the need to sleep. However, the anti-predator correlates of ASEC remain largely unstudied in other ...


The Evolution Of Sleep: A Phylogenetic Approach, John Lesku, Niels Rattenborg, Charles Amlaner Dec 2005

The Evolution Of Sleep: A Phylogenetic Approach, John Lesku, Niels Rattenborg, Charles Amlaner

Charles J. Amlaner

No abstract provided.