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Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology Commons

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Physical Sciences and Mathematics

2003

Selected Works

Proteomics

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology

Quality Control And Peak Finding For Proteomics Data Collected From Nipple Aspirate Fluid Using Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption And Ionization., Jeffrey S. Morris, Kevin R. Coombes, Herbert A. Fritsche, Charlotte Clarke, Jeng-Neng Chen, Keith A. Baggerly, Lian-Chun Xiao, Mien-Chie Hung, Henry M. Kuerer Oct 2003

Quality Control And Peak Finding For Proteomics Data Collected From Nipple Aspirate Fluid Using Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption And Ionization., Jeffrey S. Morris, Kevin R. Coombes, Herbert A. Fritsche, Charlotte Clarke, Jeng-Neng Chen, Keith A. Baggerly, Lian-Chun Xiao, Mien-Chie Hung, Henry M. Kuerer

Jeffrey S. Morris

Background: Recently, researchers have been using mass spectroscopy to study cancer. For use of proteomics spectra in a clinical setting, stringent quality-control procedures will be needed.

Methods: We pooled samples of nipple aspirate fluid from healthy breasts and breasts with cancer to prepare a control sample. Aliquots of the control sample were used on two spots on each of three IMAC ProteinChip® arrays (Ciphergen Biosystems, Inc.) on 4 successive days to generate 24 SELDI spectra. In 36 subsequent experiments, the control sample was applied to two spots of each ProteinChip array, and the resulting spectra were analyzed to determine how ...


A Comprehensive Approach To The Analysis Of Maldi-Tof Proteomics Spectra From Serum Samples., Keith A. Baggerly, Jeffrey S. Morris, Jing Wang, David Gold, Lian-Chun Xiao, Kevin R. Coombes Jun 2003

A Comprehensive Approach To The Analysis Of Maldi-Tof Proteomics Spectra From Serum Samples., Keith A. Baggerly, Jeffrey S. Morris, Jing Wang, David Gold, Lian-Chun Xiao, Kevin R. Coombes

Jeffrey S. Morris

For our analysis of the data from the First Annual Proteomics Data Mining Conference, we attempted to discriminate between 24 disease spectra (group A) and 17 normal spectra (group B). First, we processed the raw spectra by (i) correcting for additive sinusoidal noise (periodic on the time scale) affecting most spectra, (ii) correcting for the overall baseline level, (iii) normalizing, (iv) recombining fractions, and (v) using variable- width windows for data reduction. Also, we identified a set of polymeric peaks (at multiples of 180.6 Da) that is present in several normal spectra (B1–B8). After data processing, we found ...