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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology

Effects Of Estrogen On Muscle Damage In Response To An Acute Resistance Exercise Protocol, Megan R. Wolf May 2009

Effects Of Estrogen On Muscle Damage In Response To An Acute Resistance Exercise Protocol, Megan R. Wolf

Honors Scholar Theses

Creatine Kinase (CK) is used as a measure of exercise-induced muscle membrane damage. During acute eccentric (muscle lengthening) exercise, muscle sarcolemma, sarcoplasmic reticulum, and Z-lines are damaged, thus causing muscle proteins and enzymes to leak into the interstitial fluid.

Strenuous eccentric exercise produces an elevation of oxygen free radicals, which further increases muscle damage. Muscle soreness and fatigue can be attributed to this membrane damage. Estradiol, however, may preserve membrane stability post-exercise (Brancaccio, Maffulli, & Limongelli, 2007; Carter, Dobridge, & Hackney, 2001; Tiidus, 2001). Because estradiol has a similar structure to Vitamin E, which is known to have antioxidant properties, and both are known to affect ...


Characterizing The Role Of Phaeobacter In The Mortality Of The Squid, Euprymna Scolopes, Brian Shawn Wong Won May 2009

Characterizing The Role Of Phaeobacter In The Mortality Of The Squid, Euprymna Scolopes, Brian Shawn Wong Won

Honors Scholar Theses

The subject of our study is the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, which is known for its model symbiotic relationship with the bioluminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri. The interactions between E. scolopes and V. fischeri provide an exemplary model of the biochemical and molecular dynamics of symbiosis since both members can be cultivated separately and V. fischeri can be genetically modified 1. However, in a laboratory setting, the mortality of embryonic E. scolopes can be a recurrent problem. In many of these fatalities, the egg cases display a pink-hued biofilm, and rosy pigmentation has also been noted in the deaths of ...


Characterization Of A Hypothetical Protein Critical For The Symbiotic Interaction Of Aeromonas Veronii And Hirudo Verbana, Kaitlin Vaughan May 2009

Characterization Of A Hypothetical Protein Critical For The Symbiotic Interaction Of Aeromonas Veronii And Hirudo Verbana, Kaitlin Vaughan

Honors Scholar Theses

The digestive tract symbiosis of the medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana, is a model system for studying the genes required for microbial colonization of digestive tracts, as H. verbana has only two species of bacteria that dominate the crop microbiota, Aeromonas veronii and a Rikenella-like bacterium. Signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) of the A.

veronii strain, HM21R, revealed genes required for the colonization of the digestive tract. One of these mutants, JG573, has an interrupted gene that is predicted to encode a hypothetical protein. The region flanking the transposon insertion of this mutant was sequenced by primer walking.

Comparison of the flanking DNA ...


Analysis Of The Phosphorylated Forms Of Protein Kinase R, Christine Quartararo May 2009

Analysis Of The Phosphorylated Forms Of Protein Kinase R, Christine Quartararo

Honors Scholar Theses

Protein Kinase R (PKR) is induced by interferon and activated by dsRNA. Subsequent autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of eIF2alpha inhibits viral replication. In the latent state PKR exists as an unphosphorylated monomer. Work in the Cole laboratory has shown two additional states, a phosphorylated monomeric state (pPKRm) and a phosphorylated dimeric state (pPKRd). RNA serves as a scaffold bringing two PKRs together allowing dimerization and autophosphorylation to occur. The contribution of each state to the function of PKR remains unclear. Western blots were performed to examine the phosphorylation states of the essential residues,

T446 and T451. Activity assays have shown activation ...


Contribution Of The Novel C-Terminal Domain To The Ribosome Binding Activities Of Virulence Regulator Bipa, Heeren Makanji May 2009

Contribution Of The Novel C-Terminal Domain To The Ribosome Binding Activities Of Virulence Regulator Bipa, Heeren Makanji

Honors Scholar Theses

Bacterial GTPases regulate many cell functions, including the stress response, signal recognition, protein synthesis, and cell differentiation, through a molecular switch that is activated and deactivated depending on their nucleotide bound state (1). A member of the translational family of bacterial GTPases along with LepA and EF-G, BipA is a 67 kD protein that is essential for virulence and the stress response. Crystal structures from the Robinson lab have shown a unique C-terminal domain on BipA that has been implicated in ribosome binding. Using N-terminal deletion constructs, we have shown that the C-terminal domain is necessary, but not sufficient, to ...


The Role Of Raf Kinase Inhibitor Protein In Cell Motility, Kathryn Grive May 2009

The Role Of Raf Kinase Inhibitor Protein In Cell Motility, Kathryn Grive

Honors Scholar Theses

Raf Kinase Inhibitor Protein (RKIP) has been identified as a phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein capable of inhibiting Raf-1 kinase, an enzyme significant in cell proliferation and cancer development. When properly functioning, RKIP can mediate the expression of Raf-1 kinase and help prevent uncontrolled cell division. RKIP also has suggested, but unclear, roles in spindle fiber formation during mitosis, regulation of apoptosis, and cell motility. The Fenteany laboratory in the Chemistry Department identified a new small molecule, named Locostatin, as a cell migration inhibitor in mammalian cells, with RKIP as its primary molecular target.

Dictyostelium discoideum possess two RKIP proteins, RKIP-A and RKIP-B ...


Knockdown Of Kiaa0319 Reduces Dendritic Spine Density, Daniel Young Kim May 2009

Knockdown Of Kiaa0319 Reduces Dendritic Spine Density, Daniel Young Kim

Honors Scholar Theses

Developmental Dyslexia is a reading disorder that affects individuals that possess otherwise normal intelligence. Until the four candidate dyslexia susceptibility genes were discovered, the cause of cortical malformations found in post mortem dyslexic brains was unclear. Normal brain development is crucial for the proper wiring of the neural circuitry that allow an individual to perform cognitive tasks like reading. For years, familial and twin studies have suggested that there was a genetic basis to the causation of dyslexia. Kiaa0319 was among the candidate dyslexia susceptibility genes that were ascertained. KIAA0319 is located on Chromosome 6p22.2-22.3 and has been ...