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Full-Text Articles in Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology

Characterization Of Calcium Homeostasis Parameters In Trpv3 And Cav3.2 Double Null Mice, Aujan Mehregan Jan 2017

Characterization Of Calcium Homeostasis Parameters In Trpv3 And Cav3.2 Double Null Mice, Aujan Mehregan

Masters Theses

In mammals, calcium influx is required for oocyte maturation and egg activation, as it supports the persistent calcium oscillations induced by fertilization. These oscillations are required for the initiation of embryo development. The molecular identities of the plasma membrane calcium-permeant channels that underlie calcium influx are not established. Among these channels, Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid, member 3 (TRPV3) allows divalent cations, namely strontium (Sr2+) and calcium (Ca2+) with high permeability, into cells, and its expression pattern seems to predict an essential role in the initiation of development. Another channel that was identified to be expressed in oocytes/eggs ...


Regulation Of Katanin Activity On Microtubules, Madison A. Tyler Jan 2017

Regulation Of Katanin Activity On Microtubules, Madison A. Tyler

Masters Theses

The cytoskeleton is a dynamic network of microtubules constantly being reorganized to meet the spatiotemporal demands of the cell. Microtubules are organized into subcellular highways to control cell processes such as cell division, cargo transport, and neuronal development and maintenance. Reorganization of this intricate network is tightly regulated by various stabilizing and destabilizing microtubule-associated proteins that decorate the network. Katanin p60 is a microtubule destabilizing enzyme from the ATPases Associated with various Activities (AAA+) family. It can both sever and depolymerize microtubules. In order to sever microtubules, katanin recognizes the tubulin carboxy-terminal tails (CTTs) and hydrolyzes ATP. Using super-resolution microscopy ...