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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology

Transformation Of Model Organisms With Munc13-1 For Subcloning And Protein Harvesting, Grace Dittmar May 2019

Transformation Of Model Organisms With Munc13-1 For Subcloning And Protein Harvesting, Grace Dittmar

Honors Theses

Exocytosis is the process by which cells release various molecules into the extracellular space. This mechanism is accomplished by membrane fusion, in which the membrane of the transport vesicle and that of the cell itself fuse to create one continuous membrane, allowing the release of the molecules inside the vesicle. A family of proteins, known as SNARE proteins, is responsible for facilitating membrane fusion. SNARE proteins form a complex between the vesicle membrane and the plasma membrane. For various cells, such as mast cells and neurons, exocytosis is essential to carry out their vital functions. Various accessory proteins are known ...


Generation Of Mutant Snap-23 To Arrest Mast Cell Degranulation At Trans-Snare Complex Formation, Suzette Wafford-Turner May 2017

Generation Of Mutant Snap-23 To Arrest Mast Cell Degranulation At Trans-Snare Complex Formation, Suzette Wafford-Turner

Honors Theses

Regulated secretion of pro-inflammatory molecules (e.g, histamines, proteases) from mast cells plays critical roles in immunity, allergic reactions, cardiovascular disease and cancer. These molecules are stored in secretory granules inside the cell and are rapidly released into the extracellular environment when mast cells are activated. It is known that mast cell degranulation depends upon membrane anchored SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleidimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) and accessory proteins that form the trans-SNARE complex, a 4 helical bundle central to exocytic fusion. There are three SNARE proteins that contribute to the 4-helical bundle during exocytosis; Syntaxin and VAMP proteins each provide one ...


Expression Of Glycine-Rich Proteins Found In Salivary Glands Of The Lone Star Tick (Amblyomma Americanum) Using A Mammalian Cell Line, Annabelle Clark Dec 2016

Expression Of Glycine-Rich Proteins Found In Salivary Glands Of The Lone Star Tick (Amblyomma Americanum) Using A Mammalian Cell Line, Annabelle Clark

Honors Theses

Ticks play an important ecological role as well as a growing role in human health and veterinary care. Ticks are hosts to a plethora of microbial pathogens that can be transferred during feeding to cause tick-borne diseases in humans and many animals. Ticks may in large part owe the success of the transfer of these pathogens between hosts to their complex saliva. The saliva secreted upon a tick’s attachment to a host serves the following, among other, functions: anti-hemostasis of the blood pool, preventing an inflammatory response at the bite site, and serving as a natural anti-microbial substance. An ...


Functional Significance Of Branch Points In Mirtrons, Britton A. Strickland Dec 2016

Functional Significance Of Branch Points In Mirtrons, Britton A. Strickland

Honors Theses

MicroRNAs are a heterogeneous group of small regulatory RNAs generated by many pathways. Mirtrons (miR) are a class of microRNAs produced by splicing, and some mirtrons contain a 3’ tail located downstream from the self-complementary hairpin. During RNA splicing, a loop-like “lariat” intermediate structure is created when the 5’ end of the RNA is attached to an adenine called the branch point. The goal of this project is to uncover the contribution of branch point location to the processing of tailed mirtrons into functional gene regulators. This project approaches this issue from two directions. First, branch points were identified by ...


Painless Hematophagy: The Functional Role Of Novel Tick Metalloproteases In Pain Suppression, Joseph W. Jelinski May 2016

Painless Hematophagy: The Functional Role Of Novel Tick Metalloproteases In Pain Suppression, Joseph W. Jelinski

Honors Theses

Ticks secrete a plethora of pharmacologically active molecules in their saliva while feeding. These allow the tick to feed upon a host over prolonged periods of time in an itch free and painless attachment. The exact mechanism of pain suppression by the tick has barely been investigated. In this study, two angiotensin converting enzymes (ACEs), members of the metalloprotease family, are identified as potentially responsible for the degradation of pro-inflammatory peptides. It is hypothesized that these tick ACEs block the function of bradykinin through degradation of the peptide, contributing to the tick’s ability to conduct a pain and itch-free ...


Using Intrinsic Properties Of Polyaniline To Sense Expression Of The Microrna Let-7, Jared N. Gloria May 2016

Using Intrinsic Properties Of Polyaniline To Sense Expression Of The Microrna Let-7, Jared N. Gloria

Honors Theses

MicroRNAs are approximately 22-nucleotide long RNA molecules that function through decay and translational repression of messenger RNA. The microRNA let-7 is found to play a role in maintaining the fate of differentiated cells in humans. Thus, expression level of this microRNA is a reliable biomarker of tumor cell phenotype. However, there are significant limitations in the current profiling techniques of microRNA. The current methods like northern blotting, microarrays, RT-PCR, or using locked nucleic acid (LNA) for in-situ hybridization are either laborious, semi-quantitative, or expensive. In this research we try to address this issue by developing a fast, specific, and inexpensive ...


The Use Of A Small Molecule To Improve The Thermostability Of Dna Junctions, Arik Shams May 2014

The Use Of A Small Molecule To Improve The Thermostability Of Dna Junctions, Arik Shams

Honors Theses

The short-term goal of this research project is to employ small molecules as a means to stabilize four-way DNA junctions (4WJs) composed of natural DNA and chimeric nucleic acids. The long-term goal of the project is utilizing the 4WJs as extracellular therapeutic inhibitors of DNA binding proteins [i.e. Histones and High Mobility Group Protein B (HMGB1b)]. A number of studies have shown that classical intracellular DNA-binding proteins have a variety of deleterious side-effects when present in the extracellular milieu. In order to develop a successful 4WJ therapeutic, we are focused on using modified nucleic acids to enhance the stability ...