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Full-Text Articles in Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology

Genetic Testing And A Real World Case Of Lynch Syndrome, Paige Montanaro May 2018

Genetic Testing And A Real World Case Of Lynch Syndrome, Paige Montanaro

Senior Honors Projects

In recent years, advancements in genetic testing methods have revolutionized the medical field by enhancing the ability to identify persons with an inherited predisposition to cancer. According to the American Society for Clinical Oncology, individuals should undergo genetic testing when he or she meets the following criteria: the individual demonstrates familial history that indicates a predisposition to certain cancers, the test can be adequately interpreted, and the results will aid in the diagnosis, treatment, or management of the patient or additional family members at risk. Genetic testing can be done on samples of hair, skin, blood, amniotic fluid, or other ...


Mechanism Of Lck Activation In Driving Leukemia Cell Proliferation, Hannah E. Dobson May 2017

Mechanism Of Lck Activation In Driving Leukemia Cell Proliferation, Hannah E. Dobson

Senior Honors Projects

Leukemia is a type of cancer that develops in blood-forming tissues of the immune system. These tissues can include the bone marrow or sites within the lymphatic system such as the lymph nodes. Leukemia progresses from a mutational event within a white blood cell. Often this mutation alters the cell’s normal life cycle, resulting in uninhibited cell division and growth. With this uncontrolled cell proliferation, mutated white blood cells accumulate and begin interfering with the functioning of healthy cells.

Scientists are unsure of the exact mechanisms required for leukemia development. However, recently scientists identified four characteristic mutations in the ...


Defining The Sites Of Interaction Of The Fancd2, Fance, And Fancl Proteins, Joseph Mcclanaghan May 2014

Defining The Sites Of Interaction Of The Fancd2, Fance, And Fancl Proteins, Joseph Mcclanaghan

Senior Honors Projects

Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure and increased cancer susceptibility. FA is caused by mutations in any one of 16 genes. These genes encode for proteins that function in the FA-BRCA pathway to repair damaged DNA. Because of its important r­­­ole in DNA repair, this pathway is considered a major cellular tumor suppressor pathway, i.e. is critical for the prevention of cancer. Underscoring this fact, several of the FA genes - including BRCA2, BRIP1, PALB2, and RAD51C - are bona fide breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes.

My project involves studying ...