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Animal Sciences

Life and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Theses

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Full-Text Articles in Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology

Partial Isolation And Chemical Characterization Of Cytotoxic Compounds In Freshwater Sponges, Aaron Bertoni Apr 2008

Partial Isolation And Chemical Characterization Of Cytotoxic Compounds In Freshwater Sponges, Aaron Bertoni

Life and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Theses

Marine sponges are known to produce or sequester compounds useful for defense against predation and to prevent fouling by parasites. Many of the compounds extracted from marine sponges have been shown to possess useful antitumoral properties. The present study investigates two species of freshwater sponges, Eunapius fragilis and Ephydatia muelleri, for possible cytotoxic compounds as determined by brine shrimp microassay. Results show that both species have cytotoxic compounds extractable in methanol and at least two cytotoxic compounds may be present in Eunapiusfragilis, both of which are extractable in hexane. The present study provides strong support for continued natural product research ...


Screening For Antibiotic, Antifungal And Antitumoral Compounds In Natural Products Extracted From Freshwater Sponges, Danielle Daehnke Apr 2006

Screening For Antibiotic, Antifungal And Antitumoral Compounds In Natural Products Extracted From Freshwater Sponges, Danielle Daehnke

Life and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Theses

The secondary metabolites of marine sponges include many bioactive products (e.g., ara-C) that have found uses in the health field. Even though freshwater sponges share many characteristics with their marine cousins, little is known about their secondary metabolites. This study looks at the effects of the secondary metabolites extracted from three freshwater sponge species on the survival of bacteria, fungi and brine shrimp. It found that none of the extracts were toxic to the bacteria or fungi. Preliminary results did, however, show that all three species tested were active against the brine shrimp. This study suggests that the secondary ...


Concanavalin A-Binding Glycoconjugates In The Freshwater Sponge, Ephydatia Mulleri, Marek Janout Apr 1995

Concanavalin A-Binding Glycoconjugates In The Freshwater Sponge, Ephydatia Mulleri, Marek Janout

Life and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Theses

This preliminary study investigated the distribution and role of cell surface carbohydrates which were suspected to affect proximal cell interactions such as recognition and adhesion. Recognition and adhesion play roles in the development of many organisms but are easily followed in freshwater sponges. The distribution of glycoconjugates in a freshwater sponge Ephydatia mulleri was investigated with the Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reaction and lectin histochemistry. PAS revealed the distribution of general carbohydrate in the sponge. Lectin histochemistry used Concanavalin A (ConA), a mannosebinding lectin, coupled through avidin and biotin to horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) to reveal the location of mannose-containing glycoconjugates ...