Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Animal Sciences

Charles J. Amlaner

Sleep function

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology

A Phylogenetic Analysis Of Sleep Architecture In Mammals: The Integration Of Anatomy, Physiology, And Ecology, John Lesku, Timothy Roth, Charles Amlaner, Steven Lima Sep 2006

A Phylogenetic Analysis Of Sleep Architecture In Mammals: The Integration Of Anatomy, Physiology, And Ecology, John Lesku, Timothy Roth, Charles Amlaner, Steven Lima

Charles J. Amlaner

Among mammalian species, the time spent in the two main "architectural" states of sleep-slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep-varies greatly. Previous comparative studies of sleep architecture found that larger mammals, those with bigger brains, and those with higher absolute basal metabolic rates (BMR) tended to engage in less SWS and REM sleep. Species experiencing a greater risk of predation also exhibited less SWS and REM sleep. In all cases, however, these studies lacked a formal phylogenetic and theoretical framework and used mainly correlational analyses. Using independent contrasts and an updated data set, we extended existing approaches with path analysis ...


Behavioral, Neurophysiological And Evolutionary Perspectives On Unihemispheric Sleep, Niels Rattenborg, Charles Amlaner, Steven Lima Nov 2000

Behavioral, Neurophysiological And Evolutionary Perspectives On Unihemispheric Sleep, Niels Rattenborg, Charles Amlaner, Steven Lima

Charles J. Amlaner

Several animals mitigate the fundamental conflict between sleep and wakefulness by engaging in unihemispheric sleep, a unique state during which one cerebral hemisphere sleeps while the other remains awake. Among mammals, unihemispheric sleep is restricted to aquatic species (Cetaceans, cared seals and manatees). in contrast to mammals, unihemispheric sleep is widespread in birds, and may even occur in reptiles. Unihemispheric sleep allows surfacing to breathe in aquatic mammals and predator detection in birds. Despite the apparent utility in being able to sleep unihemispherically, very few mammals sleep in this manner. This is particularly interesting since the reptilian ancestors to mammals ...