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Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Animal Sciences

Charles J. Amlaner

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Slow-wave sleep

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Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology

A Phylogenetic Analysis Of The Correlates Of Sleep In Birds, Timothy Roth, John Lesku, Charles Amlaner, Steven Lima Nov 2006

A Phylogenetic Analysis Of The Correlates Of Sleep In Birds, Timothy Roth, John Lesku, Charles Amlaner, Steven Lima

Charles J. Amlaner

Quantitative comparative studies of sleep have focused exclusively on mammals. Such studies have repeatedly found strong relationships between the time spent in various sleep states and constitutive variables related to morphology, physiology, and life history. These studies influenced the development of several prominent hypotheses for the functions of sleep, but the applicability of these patterns and hypotheses to non-mammalian taxa is unclear. Here, we present the first quantitative analysis of sleep in a non-mammalian taxon (birds), focusing on the daily amount of time spent in slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep as determined by electrophysiological methods. We examined ...


Behavioral, Neurophysiological And Evolutionary Perspectives On Unihemispheric Sleep, Niels Rattenborg, Charles Amlaner, Steven Lima Nov 2000

Behavioral, Neurophysiological And Evolutionary Perspectives On Unihemispheric Sleep, Niels Rattenborg, Charles Amlaner, Steven Lima

Charles J. Amlaner

Several animals mitigate the fundamental conflict between sleep and wakefulness by engaging in unihemispheric sleep, a unique state during which one cerebral hemisphere sleeps while the other remains awake. Among mammals, unihemispheric sleep is restricted to aquatic species (Cetaceans, cared seals and manatees). in contrast to mammals, unihemispheric sleep is widespread in birds, and may even occur in reptiles. Unihemispheric sleep allows surfacing to breathe in aquatic mammals and predator detection in birds. Despite the apparent utility in being able to sleep unihemispherically, very few mammals sleep in this manner. This is particularly interesting since the reptilian ancestors to mammals ...