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Start Checking Soybean Roots For Scn Females, Gregory L. Tylka Jun 2010

Start Checking Soybean Roots For Scn Females, Gregory L. Tylka

Integrated Crop Management News

Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is a serious pest concern for soybean every season in Iowa. Current SCN management options include soil-applied nematicides and resistant soybean varieties. All are implemented at the time of planting. However, effective scouting during the growing season is the key to successful, integrated management of SCN.


Characteristics Of Corn Left Standing Through Winter 2009-2010 In Iowa, Alison E. Robertson, Gary P. Munkvold, Charles R. Hurburgh Jun 2010

Characteristics Of Corn Left Standing Through Winter 2009-2010 In Iowa, Alison E. Robertson, Gary P. Munkvold, Charles R. Hurburgh

Integrated Crop Management News

Very wet conditions in October 2009 and early snowfalls in November resulted in several thousand acres of corn left standing through the winter in Iowa. Considering the grain quality issues that ended the growing season, concerns were raised regarding the quality of corn left standing over the winter.


Scouting For Soybean Seedling Diseases, Xiao-Bing Yang, Shrishail S. Navi Jun 2010

Scouting For Soybean Seedling Diseases, Xiao-Bing Yang, Shrishail S. Navi

Integrated Crop Management News

Seedling diseases are one reason to use seed treatment. Each planting season, different weather patterns result in different seedling disease problems. This planting season has been smooth in general and seedlings have emerged in many soybean fields. So far, disease risk is lighter than last year. We did, however, observe some light occurrence of seedling disease from production fields around the central Iowa. Damping-off was also found in our research plots. It is now time to check your soybean fields to determine if there are any seedling disease problems.


Sampling Strip Trials For Corn Nematodes, Gregory L. Tylka May 2010

Sampling Strip Trials For Corn Nematodes, Gregory L. Tylka

Integrated Crop Management News

Many people currently are asking how to collect nematode samples from strip trials of corn treated with new seed-treatment nematicide products. Avicta® Complete Corn and Votivo™ are the two products commonly being compared. Avicta® Complete Corn, which was widely available to corn producers for the first time in 2010, is a combination of the Avicta seed treatment nematicide (active ingredient abamectin), a seed treatment insecticide and three seed treatment fungicides. Votivo™ is a biological seed treatment containing the bacterium Bacillus firmus that will be available in 2011.


2010 Soybean Rust Update, Daren S. Mueller May 2010

2010 Soybean Rust Update, Daren S. Mueller

Integrated Crop Management News

This could be the world’s shortest ICM News article. It could simply read “soybean rust, meh”. But I will take some time to explain. We have identified three critical steps that must happen for rust to get to Iowa. They are (1) to survive winters somewhere in the south, (2) build up inoculum (spores) where survival occurs and (3) movement of these spores to fields further north and successful infection of soybeans in those fields. These steps may need to reoccur several times for rust to get to Iowa.


Can Tank Mixing Fungicide With Post-Emergence Herbicide Increase Yield?, Alison E. Robertson May 2010

Can Tank Mixing Fungicide With Post-Emergence Herbicide Increase Yield?, Alison E. Robertson

Integrated Crop Management News

The early application of foliar fungicides to corn (V4-V7) is currently being encouraged by chemical companies across the corn belt. The idea is to tank-mix the fungicide with the post-emergence herbicide application and save on application costs. Furthermore, for additional cost savings, half or lower rates of fungicides are being marketed. It is my understanding that this early application of fungicide will not necessarily replace the VT/R1 application of foliar fungicide, rather it is an addition to the tassel/silking application.


Early Season Corn Nematode Scouting, Gregory L. Tylka May 2010

Early Season Corn Nematode Scouting, Gregory L. Tylka

Integrated Crop Management News

Plant-parasitic nematodes can be a pest concern for corn. Current corn nematode management options include seed-treatment and soil-applied nematicides; both are implemented at the time of planting. There are no effective management strategies to use after the corn crop has been planted, however effective scouting is the foundation to a successful, integrated nematode management program.


Scout For Early Summer Diseases, Xiao-Bing Yang May 2010

Scout For Early Summer Diseases, Xiao-Bing Yang

Integrated Crop Management News

Recent growing seasons have not been typical ones, and this season seems to follow this pattern. Each unusual season has unique disease problems. This year, early planted soybeans are in flowering stage and we are starting to see a different set of issues. There are three things to look for when scouting these fields.


Early Season Diseases Showing Up In Corn And Soybean Fields, Alison E. Robertson May 2010

Early Season Diseases Showing Up In Corn And Soybean Fields, Alison E. Robertson

Integrated Crop Management News

The widespread rain that has occurred across Iowa has been favorable for the development of early season disease in both corn and soybean. In corn, symptoms of anthracnose leaf blight (Figure 1) are common in corn-following corn fields. A very low prevalence of eyespot and common rust have also been seen in ISU fungicide trials. In soybean, brown spot (Figure 2) and bacterial blight (Figure 3) symptoms are becoming common.


Take Note Of Diseases In A Cool Spring, Xiao-Bing Yang May 2010

Take Note Of Diseases In A Cool Spring, Xiao-Bing Yang

Integrated Crop Management News

Producers in Iowa have had a good planting season. As of Monday, ISU agronomists reported near completion of corn and 50 percent of soybean planted in Iowa. So far this has been one of the most trouble free planting seasons I remember, with some similarities to last season.


Assess Seedling Health When Doing Stand Counts, Alison E. Robertson May 2010

Assess Seedling Health When Doing Stand Counts, Alison E. Robertson

Integrated Crop Management News

Corn planting is virtually done, and across Iowa small green spikes are becoming visible as seed germinates. Now is the time to start assessing stands. Doing stand counts involves more than just counting the number of seedlings that have emerged. Seedling health should also be assessed. ISU Extension field agronomists Virgil Schmitt and Mark Carlton have reported that seedling rots are prevalent in southeast Iowa.


Bean Pod Mottle Virus Prediction Map Updated, Emmanuel Byamukama, Alison E. Robertson, Forrest W. Nutter Jr. Apr 2010

Bean Pod Mottle Virus Prediction Map Updated, Emmanuel Byamukama, Alison E. Robertson, Forrest W. Nutter Jr.

Integrated Crop Management News

The figure below has been updated in Predicted Risk of Bean Pod Mottle Virus in 2010 - an article first posted April 12. The original map had incomplete data for some counties. Data for those counties are now available and are reflected in the the map below. See complete article.


Survey Of Corn Disease Management Practices, Alison E. Robertson Apr 2010

Survey Of Corn Disease Management Practices, Alison E. Robertson

Integrated Crop Management News

Within the next week, some of you may receive a survey from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the mail. This survey is targeted at certified crop advisors (CCAs) in Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin and Ohio. A similar survey will be sent to corn growers in each state in a few weeks. Extension field crop specialists, Alison Robertson (ISU), Carl Bradley (UWI), Pierce Paul (OSU) and Paul Esker (UW) have received funding from the USDA- National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program to conduct this survey. We hope to understand the risks corn growers face, and the tools ...


Predicted Risk Of Bean Pod Mottle Virus In 2010, Emmanuel Byamukama, Alison E. Robertson, Forrest W. Nutter Jr. Apr 2010

Predicted Risk Of Bean Pod Mottle Virus In 2010, Emmanuel Byamukama, Alison E. Robertson, Forrest W. Nutter Jr.

Integrated Crop Management News

Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) continues to pose a threat to soybean production by reducing soybean yield and affecting soybean quality. In a recent 3-year survey study conducted during the 2005 through 2007 soybean growing seasons, BPMV was found to be one of the most prevalent soybean diseases in Iowa, with BPMV being detected in 10 (2005) to 40 percent (2006) of the approximately 1,200 soybean fields sampled and tested each growing season. By mapping BPMV incidence at the county scale, BPMV incidence (risk) was found to occur at varying intensities within and among Iowa counties. Generally, risk of ...


Corn Nematodes And Soybean Cyst Nematode: Similar But Very Different, Gregory L. Tylka Mar 2010

Corn Nematodes And Soybean Cyst Nematode: Similar But Very Different, Gregory L. Tylka

Integrated Crop Management News

Corn nematodes and the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) are microscopic, plant-parasitic worms that live in the soil and feed on plant roots. Iowa crop producers and agribusiness professionals generally are aware of the soybean cyst nematode and its biology, scouting and management. But many people want to learn more about the biology, scouting and management of corn nematodes.


Information About Corn Nematodes And Scn Available Online From Isu Crop Adviser Institute, Gregory L. Tylka Mar 2010

Information About Corn Nematodes And Scn Available Online From Isu Crop Adviser Institute, Gregory L. Tylka

Integrated Crop Management News

A new source of information about the biology and management of corn nematodes is now available free online from Iowa State University. It’s a training module from the ISU Crop Adviser Institute. Topics discussed in the module include:

  • the different species of nematodes that can parasitize corn
  • review of the basic biology of corn nematodes
  • symptoms of nematode damage to corn
  • how to determine if a corn field has nematode damage
  • current management options for corn nematodes
  • the new cyst nematode discovered on corn in 2007


Summary Of 2009 Western Bean Cutworm Trapping Program, Laura C.H. Jesse, Erin W. Hodgson, Adam Sisson, Richard Pope Feb 2010

Summary Of 2009 Western Bean Cutworm Trapping Program, Laura C.H. Jesse, Erin W. Hodgson, Adam Sisson, Richard Pope

Integrated Crop Management News

The western bean cutworm (WBC), once a pest of the High Plains, has been on the move since at least 2000. (See map below.) This native caterpillar pest of dry beans and corn has been expanding its range to the east through the Corn Belt. WBC spread across Iowa during 2000-2003 and was first recorded in Illinois and Missouri in 2004.


New Iowa Performance Information Available On Scn-Resistant Soybean Varieties, Gregory L. Tylka Jan 2010

New Iowa Performance Information Available On Scn-Resistant Soybean Varieties, Gregory L. Tylka

Integrated Crop Management News

The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is a serious yield-limiting pest of soybeans in Iowa and the Midwest. SCN-resistant soybean varieties are critical for managing SCN. There are hundreds of soybean varieties available to Iowa soybean growers that are marketed as being resistant to SCN (seeSoybean cyst nematode-resistant soybean varieties for Iowa – PM 1649).


So Many Scn-Resistant Varieties: Which Should You Use?, Gregory L. Tylka Jan 2010

So Many Scn-Resistant Varieties: Which Should You Use?, Gregory L. Tylka

Integrated Crop Management News

Soybean varieties that are resistant to the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) are a critical management tool for the pest. In general, SCN-resistant varieties produce greater yields and result in lower SCN numbers at the end of the season than non-resistant (susceptible) varieties.


2009 Soybean Rust Summary, Daren S. Mueller Jan 2010

2009 Soybean Rust Summary, Daren S. Mueller

Integrated Crop Management News

Soybean rust once again did not make it to Iowa in 2009, but it wasn’t from a lack of trying. Rust was found early in Louisiana and eventually was found at high levels throughout the Southeast. These – overwintering finds and high levels of inoculum in the South – are two prerequisites for rust getting to Iowa.


Recommendations For Managing Soybean White Mold In 2010, Xiao-Bing Yang Dec 2009

Recommendations For Managing Soybean White Mold In 2010, Xiao-Bing Yang

Integrated Crop Management News

The 2009 growing season had record cool weather in July that was ideal for soybean white mold occurrence. The disease was widespread in the north central region of the U.S. and agronomists even in southern Iowa observed this disease in many soybean fields. In northern Iowa, patches of soybean killed by this disease were obvious in many soybean fields along the highways. Some farmers reported losses totaling more than $10,000 from this disease.


Minimize Sds And White Mold Risk To Same Field, Xiao-Bing Yang Dec 2009

Minimize Sds And White Mold Risk To Same Field, Xiao-Bing Yang

Integrated Crop Management News

Both soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS) and white mold (WM) were wide spread in Iowa during the 2009 season. The simultaneous outbreak of soybean sudden death syndrome and white mold (SDS-WM) had only occurred once previously – in east central Iowa during the 2007 growing season. This season was the first time that the two diseases were wide spread in Iowa. Many growers experienced the occurrence of SDS-WM on the same farm, some in the same field. In one session at the Iowa State University Integrated Crop Management Conference on Dec. 3 in Ames, I polled the group to learn how ...


How Delayed Harvest Might Affect Ear Rots And Mycotoxin Contamination, Alison E. Robertson, Gary P. Munkvold Oct 2009

How Delayed Harvest Might Affect Ear Rots And Mycotoxin Contamination, Alison E. Robertson, Gary P. Munkvold

Integrated Crop Management News

The corn harvest is later than it has been any time in recent memory, and the prolonged moist conditions are conducive for molds to develop on grain in the field. Over the past few days we have received numerous reports of ear rots developing in the field and questions concerning mycotoxin production when conditions are cool but wet.


2009 Corn Quality Issues – Field Molds, Alison E. Robertson, Roger Elmore, Charles R. Hurburgh Oct 2009

2009 Corn Quality Issues – Field Molds, Alison E. Robertson, Roger Elmore, Charles R. Hurburgh

Integrated Crop Management News

Frost Oct. 10 and 11 ended the crop growing season in most parts of the state, at the same time the USDA announced October yield estimates of 186 bushels per acre in Iowa. Although high grain yields are expected, reports of quality issues are surfacing.


Stalk And Ear Rots Prevalent In Iowa, Alison E. Robertson Oct 2009

Stalk And Ear Rots Prevalent In Iowa, Alison E. Robertson

Integrated Crop Management News

The cool, wet growing season has favored infection and the development of certain corn ear and stalk rots in Iowa. Foliar diseases that occurred earlier in the growing season may have increased the risk of stalk rots in fields. In corn trials across the state, anthracnose and Gibberella stalk rots are common. Ear rots that are being reported across the state include Diplodia, Gibberella and Fusarium.


Update On Hail Damaged Grain, Charles R. Hurburgh, Alison E. Robertson Sep 2009

Update On Hail Damaged Grain, Charles R. Hurburgh, Alison E. Robertson

Integrated Crop Management News

The situation with the hail damage to crops in north central Iowa is becoming clearer. On Aug. 9, 2009 an intense storm travelled approximately 150 miles from western Sac and Ida counties to eastern Grundy County. The hail swath was about ten miles wide, between Highways I-175 and US-20, with three miles in the middle being almost completely lost. The stones were large, which created major damage to both plants and developing grain. Earlier storms in northeast Iowa also created large losses but the grain itself was less developed.


Degree Days - The Finish Line Looms, Richard O. Pope Sep 2009

Degree Days - The Finish Line Looms, Richard O. Pope

Integrated Crop Management News

As of Sept. 27, 2009, we are close to winning the race between early frost and crop maturation across Iowa. The average date of first killing frost ranges from around Oct. 5 in central Iowa; about a week earlier to the north and west ,and a week later in southeast Iowa. It appears now that the 2009 first killing frost will occur at least at the average, and hopefully a bit later.


Degree Days - Watching, Waiting And Staying Warm, Richard O. Pope Sep 2009

Degree Days - Watching, Waiting And Staying Warm, Richard O. Pope

Integrated Crop Management News

A near-perfect week! Sept.13 - 20 provided seasonally normal temperatures, bright sunshine and some light rain at week's end; all of which are favorable to Iowa's maturing crop. As of Sept. 21, the mid-range forecast is calling for night temperatures that should NOT approach killing temperatures. If this bears out, it will mean no early frost in 2009.


Manage Soybean Diseases At Harvest Time, Xiao-Bing Yang Sep 2009

Manage Soybean Diseases At Harvest Time, Xiao-Bing Yang

Integrated Crop Management News

Two soybean diseases - sudden death syndrome (SDS) and soybean white mold - are wide spread in Iowa this season. In August SDS showed up in almost every Iowa region, with some regions having high disease intensity. Large patches of soybean with SDS symptom are obvious from south to north. White mold, a disease that can drastically cut yields, started to get the attention of producers in late August. This year white mold is so wide spread that agronomists report observing it in many soybean fields in southern Iowa. In northern Iowa, patches of soybean killed by this disease were so abundant ...


Hail Damage – Grain Quality Survey, Bill Arndorfer, Alison E. Robertson, Gary P. Munkvold, Charles R. Hurburgh, Steve Ensley Sep 2009

Hail Damage – Grain Quality Survey, Bill Arndorfer, Alison E. Robertson, Gary P. Munkvold, Charles R. Hurburgh, Steve Ensley

Integrated Crop Management News

There were two major hail events this summer during grain fill that resulted in significant corn crop damage in the path of the storm. The damage occurred over several thousand acres with some fields being a total loss and other fields having varying degrees of damage. This resulted in several crop hail damage meetings across the state to help farmers make informed harvest decisions. A common question from farmers and grain merchandisers dealt with grain quality issues. Specifically, what impact will the hail damage have on grain quality, ear rot severity and mycotoxin contamination in my corn crop?