Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Plant Pathology

Integrated Crop Management News

2009

Entomology

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Considerations For Soybean Insecticides And Fungicides, Alison E. Robertson, Daren S. Mueller, Nate Bestor, Matthew E. O'Neal, Rebekah Ritson Jul 2009

Considerations For Soybean Insecticides And Fungicides, Alison E. Robertson, Daren S. Mueller, Nate Bestor, Matthew E. O'Neal, Rebekah Ritson

Integrated Crop Management News

Several Iowa agribusinesses are offering soybean growers pest management plans that include applications of fungicide and insecticide. Although combining an insecticide and fungicide may be convenient, the results from our 2008 Pesticide Stewardship trials suggest this is a convenience that may not pay off.


Size Restrictions For Postemergence Herbicides In Corn, Erin W. Hodgson, Richard O. Pope Jun 2009

Size Restrictions For Postemergence Herbicides In Corn, Erin W. Hodgson, Richard O. Pope

Integrated Crop Management News

Stalk borer is native to Iowa and has only one generation per year. Adult stalk borers are grayish-brown moths with white spots along the forewing with a 1-inch wingspan. Adults emerge in early August and lay eggs in grasses and broadleaf weeds until October. Larvae hatch in late April and early May, or when 500 degree days (base 41°F) have accumulated.


Alfalfa Weevil Hatch Is Upon Us, Richard O. Pope, Jon J. Tollefson Apr 2009

Alfalfa Weevil Hatch Is Upon Us, Richard O. Pope, Jon J. Tollefson

Integrated Crop Management News

The map below indicates the accumulated degree days for each of the nine Iowa crop reporting districts. Degree-day information indicates that alfalfa weevil larvae should be hatching this week in southern Iowa. In central Iowa counties, weevils should be hatching by the third week of April; and in northern Iowa, weevils should hatch the last full week of April. That means that fields in southern Iowa should be scouted now.


A 2009 Prediction For Stewart’S Disease Of Corn, Forrest W. Nutter Jr., Alison E. Robertson, Jon J. Tollefson, Richard O. Pope Apr 2009

A 2009 Prediction For Stewart’S Disease Of Corn, Forrest W. Nutter Jr., Alison E. Robertson, Jon J. Tollefson, Richard O. Pope

Integrated Crop Management News

December, January and February temperatures were all colder than average across Iowa. As a result, the risk for Stewart’s disease of corn in 2009 is low to negligible throughout all of Iowa, based on two predictive models. Stewart’s disease, also known as Stewart’s wilt, is caused by the bacterium Pantoea stewartii. An insect vector, the corn flea beetle, plays a critical role in the plant-to-plant spread of this causal microorganism.