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Genetics

University of Nebraska - Lincoln

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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Plant Mitochondrial Genome Evolution And Structure Has Been Shaped By Double-Strand Break Repair And Recombination, Emily Wynn Apr 2019

Plant Mitochondrial Genome Evolution And Structure Has Been Shaped By Double-Strand Break Repair And Recombination, Emily Wynn

Dissertations and Theses in Biological Sciences

Plant mitochondrial genomes are large but contain a small number of genes. These genes have very low mutation rates, but genomes rearrange and expand at significant rates. We propose that much of the apparent complexity of plant mitochondrial genomes can be explained by the interactions of double-strand break repair, recombination, and selection. One possible explanation for the disparity between the low mutation rates of genes and the high divergence of non-genes is that synonymous mutations in genes are not truly neutral. In some species, rps14 has been duplicated in the nucleus, allowing the mitochondrial copy to become a pseudogene. By ...


Detection Of Heteroplasmic Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Using Melt Curve Analysis And Dual Labeled Fluorescent Probes, Emily Jezewski Apr 2019

Detection Of Heteroplasmic Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Using Melt Curve Analysis And Dual Labeled Fluorescent Probes, Emily Jezewski

Honors Theses, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Plant mitochondrial genomes are strange – they are unusually large, consist of huge amounts of non-coding DNA, and contain of several overlapping regions throughout the genome. The genome is made of several different sized linear and circular molecules and different mitochondria within a cell will have different pieces of the genome. Even if multiple mitochondria contain the same region of the genome, these sequences can differ by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPS). This is known as heteroplasmy. Heteroplasmy has been documented in Arabidopsis thaliana using whole-genome sequencing data. While heteroplasmy is well-documented, its existence in the mitochondrial genome is unexpected and it ...


Genome-Wide Characterization, Molecular Evolution And Mexpression Profiling Of The Metacaspases In Potato (Solanum Tuberosum L.), Nehal Dubey, Maitri Trivedi, Suresh Varsani, Vishal Vyas, Manisha Farsodia, Sunil Kumar Singh Jan 2019

Genome-Wide Characterization, Molecular Evolution And Mexpression Profiling Of The Metacaspases In Potato (Solanum Tuberosum L.), Nehal Dubey, Maitri Trivedi, Suresh Varsani, Vishal Vyas, Manisha Farsodia, Sunil Kumar Singh

Faculty Publications: Department of Entomology

Metacaspases are distant relatives of animal caspases found in plants, protozoa and fungi. Some recent studies have demonstrated that metacaspases are involved in regulating the developmental and environmentally induced programmed cell death in plants. In this study, we identified metacaspase gene family in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) and analyzed their expression pattern in various developmental tissues and stress responses of plants. There were eight metacaspase genes identified in the Peptidase (Cysteine protease) C14 family and based upon sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis, a systematic nomenclature of potato metacaspases (SotubMCs) has been proposed. Three of the eight candidate genes showing homology ...


Genetic Diversity And Distinctness Of Wild Nebraska Hops And Hop Cultivars (Humulus Lupulus L.), Megan Franklin Mar 2018

Genetic Diversity And Distinctness Of Wild Nebraska Hops And Hop Cultivars (Humulus Lupulus L.), Megan Franklin

Honors Theses, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Background Commercial hop (Humulus lupulus) cultivars that are being grown in the Midwest are not performing as successfully as when they are grown in the Pacific Northwest, the region to which they are adapted. To increase adaptation to the Midwest environment, one strategy is to draw from the genetic pool of wild native Midwest hops, which have developed genes that allow them to grow successfully in this environment. Wild hop plants that are genetically distinct from commercial cultivars are likely to have more adaptations, such as pest/disease resistance and drought tolerance, which can be bred into commercial lines. The ...


Metabolic Investigations Of The Molecular Mechanisms Associated With Parkinson’S Disease, Robert Powers, Shulei Lei, Annadurai Anandhan, Darrell D. Marshall, Bradley Worley, Ronald Cerny, Eric D. Dodds, Yuting Huang, Mihalis I. Panayiotidis, Aglaia Pappa, Rodrigo Franco Jan 2017

Metabolic Investigations Of The Molecular Mechanisms Associated With Parkinson’S Disease, Robert Powers, Shulei Lei, Annadurai Anandhan, Darrell D. Marshall, Bradley Worley, Ronald Cerny, Eric D. Dodds, Yuting Huang, Mihalis I. Panayiotidis, Aglaia Pappa, Rodrigo Franco

Robert Powers Publications

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by fibrillar cytoplasmic aggregates of α-synuclein (i.e., Lewy bodies) and the associated loss of dopaminergic cells in the substantia nigra. Mutations in genes such as α -synuclein (SNCA) account for only 10% of PD occurrences. Exposure to environmental toxicants including pesticides and metals (e.g., paraquat (PQ) and manganese (Mn)) is also recognized as an important PD risk factor. Thus, aging, genetic alterations, and environmental factors all contribute to the etiology of PD. In fact, both genetic and environmental factors are thought to interact in the promotion of idiopathic PD ...


Bois 412/812: Human Genetics—A Peer Review Of Teaching Project Benchmark Portfolio, Colin D. Meiklejohn Jan 2016

Bois 412/812: Human Genetics—A Peer Review Of Teaching Project Benchmark Portfolio, Colin D. Meiklejohn

UNL Faculty Course Portfolios

This portfolio focuses on Human Genetics, an upper-division course taken primarily by biology majors to fulfill elective credit in their degree. This course studies the genetic basis for human variation, with the goal of placing this variation in the context of human evolutionary history and the consequences of this variation for medical understanding and treatments. In Human Genetics, students complete an original synthetic research paper on a human genetic disorder. Through writing this paper, students are expected to learn how to navigate electronic databases and online resources on human genetic diseases, and to read and synthesize the primary scientific literature ...


Exceptionally High Levels Of Genetic Diversity In Wheat Curl Mite (Acari: Eriophyidae) Populations From Turkey, W. Szydło, Gary L. Hein, E. Denizhan, A. Skoracka Jun 2015

Exceptionally High Levels Of Genetic Diversity In Wheat Curl Mite (Acari: Eriophyidae) Populations From Turkey, W. Szydło, Gary L. Hein, E. Denizhan, A. Skoracka

Faculty Publications: Department of Entomology

Recent research on the wheat curl mite species complex has revealed extensive genetic diversity that has distinguished several genetic lineages infesting bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and other cereals worldwide. Turkey is the historical region of wheat and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) domestication and diversification. The close relationship between these grasses and the wheat curl mite provoked the question of the genetic diversity of the wheat curl mite in this region. The scope of the study was to investigate genetic differentiation within the wheat curl mite species complex on grasses in Turkey. Twenty-one wheat curl mite populations from 16 grass ...


Estimation Of Breed-Specific Heterosis Effects For Birth, Weaning, And Yearling Weight In Cattle, Lauren N. Schiermiester, R. M. Thallman, Larry Kuehn, Stephen D. Kachman, Matthew L. Spangler Jan 2015

Estimation Of Breed-Specific Heterosis Effects For Birth, Weaning, And Yearling Weight In Cattle, Lauren N. Schiermiester, R. M. Thallman, Larry Kuehn, Stephen D. Kachman, Matthew L. Spangler

Faculty Papers and Publications in Animal Science

Heterosis, assumed proportional to expected breed heterozygosity, was calculated for 6834 individuals with birth, weaning and yearling weight records from Cycle VII and advanced generations of the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (USMARC) Germplasm Evaluation (GPE) project. Breeds represented in these data included: Angus, Hereford, Red Angus, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Simmental, Limousin and Composite MARC III. Heterosis was further estimated by proportions of British × British (B × B), British × Continental (B × C) and Continental × Continental (C × C) crosses and by breed-specific combinations. Model 1 fitted fixed covariates for heterosis within biological types while Model 2 fitted random breed-specific combinations nested within ...


Managing Hybridization Of A Recovering Endangered Species: The Red Wolf Canis Rufus As A Case Study, Eric M. Gese, Fred F. Knowlton, Jennifer R. Adams, Karen Beck, Todd K. Fuller, Dennis L. Murray, Todd D. Steury, Michael K. Stoskopf, Will T. Waddell, Lisette P. Waits Jan 2015

Managing Hybridization Of A Recovering Endangered Species: The Red Wolf Canis Rufus As A Case Study, Eric M. Gese, Fred F. Knowlton, Jennifer R. Adams, Karen Beck, Todd K. Fuller, Dennis L. Murray, Todd D. Steury, Michael K. Stoskopf, Will T. Waddell, Lisette P. Waits

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

Hybridization presents a unique challenge for conservation biologists and managers. While hybridization is an important evolutionary process, hybridization is also a threat formany native species. The endangered species recovery effort for the red wolf Canis rufus is a classic system for understanding and addressing the challenges of hybridization. From 1987‒1993, 63 red wolves were released from captivity in eastern North Carolina, USA, to establish a free-ranging, non-essential experimental population. By 1999, managers recognized hybridization with invasive coyotes Canis latrans was the single greatest threat to successful recovery, and an adaptive management plan was adopted with innovative approaches for managing ...


Genome-Wide Prediction Of Age At Puberty And Reproductive Longevity In Sows, Julie Kathleen Tart, Rodger K. Johnson, Justin W. Bundy, N. N. Ferdinand, A. M. Mcknite, Jennifer R. Wood, Phillip S. Miller, M. F. Rothschild, Matthew L. Spangler, Dorian J. Garrick, Stephen D. Kachman, Daniel C. Ciobanu Aug 2013

Genome-Wide Prediction Of Age At Puberty And Reproductive Longevity In Sows, Julie Kathleen Tart, Rodger K. Johnson, Justin W. Bundy, N. N. Ferdinand, A. M. Mcknite, Jennifer R. Wood, Phillip S. Miller, M. F. Rothschild, Matthew L. Spangler, Dorian J. Garrick, Stephen D. Kachman, Daniel C. Ciobanu

Faculty Papers and Publications in Animal Science

Traditional selection for sow reproductive longevity is ineffective due to low heritability and late expression of the trait. Incorporation of DNA markers into selection programs is potentially a more practical approach for improving sow lifetime productivity. Using a resource population of crossbred gilts, we explored pleiotropic sources of variation that influence age at puberty and reproductive longevity. Of the traits recorded before breeding, only age at puberty significantly affected the probability that females would produce a first parity litter. The genetic variance explained by 1-Mb windows of the sow genome, compared across traits, uncovered regions that influence both age at ...


The Evolution Of Host Specificity In The Vertebrate Gut Symbiont Lactobacillus Reuteri, Steven Frese Nov 2012

The Evolution Of Host Specificity In The Vertebrate Gut Symbiont Lactobacillus Reuteri, Steven Frese

Dissertations, Theses, & Student Research in Food Science and Technology

The vertebrate gut is home to one of the densest populations of life on Earth. This microbial community has a profound effect on host health, nutrition, development, behavior, and evolution. However, very little is known about how these microbes have evolved with their vertebrate hosts, how and whether they select hosts or how they remain associated with their hosts. Recent work identified Lactobacillus reuteri as an organism that is composed of host-specific sub-populations, each population associated with a different host animal. Representatives from each host-associated population were tested for their ability to colonize gnotobiotic mice, which only rodent strains could ...


Genetic Measures Confirm Familial Relationships And Strengthen Study Design, Stacie J. Robinson, Ryan D. Walrath, Timonthy R. Vandeelen, Kurt C. Vercauteren Jan 2012

Genetic Measures Confirm Familial Relationships And Strengthen Study Design, Stacie J. Robinson, Ryan D. Walrath, Timonthy R. Vandeelen, Kurt C. Vercauteren

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

Social structure and behavioral interactions between individuals shape basic biological processes, such as breeding; foraging and predator avoidance; movement and dispersal; and disease transmission. We used a targeted trapping strategy to capture kin groups of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) during 2007 and 2008 in Sandhill Wildlife Research Area, Wisconsin, USA, in order to observe social behaviors. Because inferring family relationships from observation of behavior is subjective, we usedmeasures of genetic relatedness and parentage assignment tests to determine that our capture strategy was efficient for capturing related pairs (78% of groups contained 1 dyad of related animals). The results of our ...


The Scientific Classification Of Wolves: Canis Lupus Soupus, L. David Mech Jan 2011

The Scientific Classification Of Wolves: Canis Lupus Soupus, L. David Mech

USGS Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

Gray wolf, timber wolf, red wolf, eastern wolf, brush wolf, arctic wolf, Mexican wolf, maned wolf, Ethiopian wolf, etc., etc. How many kinds of wolves are there? And what are the differences? This is a really good question, and the answer is getting more complicated all the time. Let us start by going back a few years to the way science looked at wolves more traditionally— before the days of the new field of molecular genetics. Molecular genetics examines the actual DNA of animals and tries to classify them according to genetic similarities. ...

What does all this mean in terms ...


Genetic Variation And Inheritance Of Diapause Induction In Two Distinct Voltine Ecotypes Of Ostrinia Nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), Cengis Ikten, Steven R. Skoda, Thomas E. Hunt, Jaime Molina-Ochoa, John E. Foster Jan 2011

Genetic Variation And Inheritance Of Diapause Induction In Two Distinct Voltine Ecotypes Of Ostrinia Nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), Cengis Ikten, Steven R. Skoda, Thomas E. Hunt, Jaime Molina-Ochoa, John E. Foster

Faculty Publications: Department of Entomology

European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), displays a larval diapause in response to short photoperiods and is adapted to a variety of local conditions throughout North America. Hence, the effective photoperiod inducing larval diapause will differ among geographic ecotypes. This study considers the inheritance of photoperiodic larval diapause induction by hybridization and backcrossing two latitudinally distinct ecotypes of the European corn borer collected between 41° N, 96° W and 48° N, 96° W and under a range of photoperiods representative of their respective locations: from 14:10 to 16:8 (L:D) h. The ecotype adapted to a ...


Structuring An Efficient Organic Wheat Breeding Program, P. Stephen Baenziger, Ibrahim Salah, Richard S. Little, Dipak K. Santra, Teshome Regassa, Meng Yuan Wang Jan 2011

Structuring An Efficient Organic Wheat Breeding Program, P. Stephen Baenziger, Ibrahim Salah, Richard S. Little, Dipak K. Santra, Teshome Regassa, Meng Yuan Wang

Agronomy & Horticulture -- Faculty Publications

Our long-term goal is to develop wheat cultivars that will improve the profitability and competitiveness of organic producers in Nebraska and the Northern Great Plains. Our approach is to select in early generations for highly heritable traits that are needed for both organic and conventional production (another breeding goal), followed by a targeted organic breeding effort with testing at two organic locations (each in a different ecological region) beginning with the F6 generation. Yield analyses from replicated trials at two organic breeding sites and 7 conventional breeding sites from F6 through F12 nurseries revealed, using analyses of ...


Microsatellites Reveal Genetic Diversity In Rotylenchulus Reniformis Populations, R. S. Arias, Salliana R. Stetina, Jennifer L. Tonos, Jodi A. Scheffler, Brian E. Scheffler Jan 2009

Microsatellites Reveal Genetic Diversity In Rotylenchulus Reniformis Populations, R. S. Arias, Salliana R. Stetina, Jennifer L. Tonos, Jodi A. Scheffler, Brian E. Scheffler

Publications from USDA-ARS / UNL Faculty

Rotylenchulus reniformis is the predominant parasitic nematode of cotton in the Mid South area of the United States. Although variable levels of infection and morphological differences have been reported for this nematode, genetic variability has been more elusive. We developed microsatellite-enriched libraries for R. reniformis, produced 1152 clones, assembled 694 corstigs, detected 783 simple sequence repeats (SSR) and designed 192 SSR-markers. The markers were tested on six R. reniformis cultures from four states, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Georgia, in the USA. Based oil performance we selected 156 SSR markers for R. reniformis from which 88 were polymorphic across the six ...


2008 Nebraska Beef Cattle Report Summaries, Richard J. Rasby, Galen E. Erickson, Dennis R. Brink Jan 2008

2008 Nebraska Beef Cattle Report Summaries, Richard J. Rasby, Galen E. Erickson, Dennis R. Brink

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

Reports on recent beef research are briefly summarized in this publication. Summaries of the research featured in the 2008 Beef Report appear here. Topics include cow-calf, growing, finishing and beef products.


Contributions To The Chiroptera Of Mongolia With First Evidences On Species Communities And Ecological Niches, Dietrich Dolch, Nyamsuren Batsaikhan, Klaus Thiele, Frank Burger, Ingo Scheffler, Andreas Kiefer, Frieder Mayer, Ravčigijn Samjaa, Annegret Stubbe, Michael Stubbe, Leonard Krall, Dirk Steinhauser Jan 2007

Contributions To The Chiroptera Of Mongolia With First Evidences On Species Communities And Ecological Niches, Dietrich Dolch, Nyamsuren Batsaikhan, Klaus Thiele, Frank Burger, Ingo Scheffler, Andreas Kiefer, Frieder Mayer, Ravčigijn Samjaa, Annegret Stubbe, Michael Stubbe, Leonard Krall, Dirk Steinhauser

Erforschung biologischer Ressourcen der Mongolei / Exploration into the Biological Resources of Mongolia, ISSN 0440-1298

In this paper are presented the accounts of 13 identified bat species from a total of 628 captured specimens from 32 locations in Mongolia during three field expeditions. These species accounts include taxonomical, morphological, and ecological data resulting from observations and further analyses. As a result of this work the distribution of some bat species in Mongolia can be drawn in more detail. For instance, Vespertilio murinus is much wider distributed and abundant than the former records indicate. The Plecotus species were clearly identified by genetic analyses combined with morphological characteristics. Moreover, the second record for Eptesicus serotinus and the ...


When Reintroductions Are Augmentations: The Genetic Legacy Of Fishers (Martes Pennanti) In Montana, Ray S. Vinkey, Michael K. Schwartz, Kevin S. Mckelvey, Kerry R. Foresman, Kristine L. Pilgrim, Brian J. Giddings, Eric C. Lofroth Jan 2006

When Reintroductions Are Augmentations: The Genetic Legacy Of Fishers (Martes Pennanti) In Montana, Ray S. Vinkey, Michael K. Schwartz, Kevin S. Mckelvey, Kerry R. Foresman, Kristine L. Pilgrim, Brian J. Giddings, Eric C. Lofroth

USDA Forest Service / UNL Faculty Publications

Fishers (Martes pennanti) were purportedly extirpated from Montana by 1930 and extant populations are assumed to be descended from translocated fishers. To determine the lineage of fisher populations, we sequenced 2 regions of the mitochondrial DNA genome from 207 tissue samples from British Columbia, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Montana. In northwestern Montana, fishers share haplotypes with samples from the upper Midwest and British Columbia; in west-central Montana, we detected haplotypes found in British Columbia samples, but also detected a control region and cytochrome-b haplotype not found in source populations. Based on the unique haplotypes found in west-central Montana, we propose ...


2006 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane E. Reese Jan 2006

2006 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane E. Reese

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating Departments for use in Extension, Teaching and Research programs. It deals with the results that were done in reproduction, breeding, health, nutrition, genetics, economics and housing of swine.


2005 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane E. Reese Jan 2005

2005 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane E. Reese

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating Departments for use in Extension, Teaching and Research programs. It deals with the results that were done in reproduction, breeding, health, genetics, nutrition, economics and housing of swine.


2004 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane E. Reese Jan 2004

2004 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane E. Reese

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publications was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating Departments for use in Extension, Teaching and Research programs. It deals with the results that were done in reproduction, breeding, health, genetics, nutrition, economics and housing of swine.


2003 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane E. Reese Jan 2003

2003 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane E. Reese

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating Departments for use in Extension, Teaching and Research programs. It deals with the results that were done in reproduction, breeding, health, genetics, nutrition, economics and housing of swine.


2002 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane E. Reese Jan 2002

2002 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane E. Reese

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating Departments for use in Extension, Teaching and Research programs. It deals with the results that were done in reproduction, breeding, health, nutrition, economics and housing of swine.


Evaluation Of The Major Histocompatibility Complex (Mhc) In Cranes: Applications To Conservation Efforts, Susan I. Jarvi, Marcia M. Miller, Ronald M. Gotol, George F. Gee, W. Elwood Briles Jan 2001

Evaluation Of The Major Histocompatibility Complex (Mhc) In Cranes: Applications To Conservation Efforts, Susan I. Jarvi, Marcia M. Miller, Ronald M. Gotol, George F. Gee, W. Elwood Briles

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

Although there have been heated discussions concerning the relative importance of using Mhc diversity as a basis for selecting breeders in conservation projects, most parties agree that the genetic variability residual in an endangered species should be maintained through genetic management, if at all possible. Substantial evidence exists (particularly in birds) documenting the influences of specific Mhc haplotypes on disease outcome and also that those individuals which are heterozygous for Mhc alleles appear to have an advantage for survival over those that are homozygous. Thus, conservation of genetic variability of the Mhc is likely important for the preservation of fitness ...


2001 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane E. Reese Jan 2001

2001 Nebraska Swine Report, Duane E. Reese

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating Departments for use in Extension, Teaching and Research programs. It deals with the results that were done in reproduction, breeding, health, nutrition, economics and housing of swine.


Effects Of Genetic Type And Protein Levels On Growth Of Swine, O.W. Robison, L. L. Christian, R. Goodwin, R. K. Johnson, J. W. Mabry, R. K. Miller, M. D. Tokach Aug 2000

Effects Of Genetic Type And Protein Levels On Growth Of Swine, O.W. Robison, L. L. Christian, R. Goodwin, R. K. Johnson, J. W. Mabry, R. K. Miller, M. D. Tokach

Faculty Papers and Publications in Animal Science

A total of 1,588 pigs representing six genetic lines were included in this study. These lines were selected to represent a wide range of biological types for appetite, rate and composition of gain, and meat quality traits. Each line was fed four different diets differing in lysine content. Barrows and gilts were used in the experiment, and pigs were randomly assigned to come off test at one of three weights (113.6, 131.8, or 150 kg). Rates of increase in weight, backfat thickness, and longissimus muscle area were essentially linear. Genetic type and diet influenced (P < .05) rates of change in weight, backfat thickness, and longissimus muscle area and 10th rib fat depth, carcass longissimus muscle area, and dressing percentage. Genetic type × diet interactions were significant for weight change and 10th rib fat. As off-test-weight class increased fat and longissimus muscle area increased in linear fashion. In general, interactions associated with diet resulted from feeding the diet lowest in lysine. There was little evidence of genetic type × diet interactions. If those interactions that tested significant are real, they are a result of extremes in both genetic type (high fatness) and lysine level (low). Slaughtering pigs at heavier weights results in no change in rate of gain over the feeding period and linear increases in longissimus muscle area and backfat thickness.


Genetic Correlations For Daily Gain Between Ram And Ewe Lambs Fed In Feedlot Conditions And Ram Lambs Fed In Pinpointer Units, L. Dale Van Vleck, Kreg A. Leymaster, Thomas G. Jenkins Apr 2000

Genetic Correlations For Daily Gain Between Ram And Ewe Lambs Fed In Feedlot Conditions And Ram Lambs Fed In Pinpointer Units, L. Dale Van Vleck, Kreg A. Leymaster, Thomas G. Jenkins

Faculty Papers and Publications in Animal Science

When performance is recorded in automated facilities that measure feed intake of individual lambs that are penned in a group, such as Pinpointer units, a legitimate question is the degree to which daily gain is genetically correlated with daily gain achieved under feedlot conditions. Lambs were from a composite population (½Columbia, ¼ Suffolk, and ¼ Hampshire germplasm) and of the F2 or more advanced generations. Data were daily gains of 1,101 rams (PR) fed in Pinpointer units (11 to 17 wk of age) and 2,021 rams (FR) and 3,513 ewes (FE) fed under feedlot conditions (9- ...


2000 Nebraska Swine Report, Rodger K. Johnson Jan 2000

2000 Nebraska Swine Report, Rodger K. Johnson

Historical Materials from University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension

This publication was prepared by the staff in Animal Science and cooperating Departments for use in Extension, Teaching and Research programs. It deals with the results that were done in reproduction, breeding, health, nutrition, economics and housing of swine.


Implications Of Cloning For Breed Improvement Strategies: Are Traditional Methods Of Animal Improvement Obsolete?, L. Dale Van Vleck Apr 1999

Implications Of Cloning For Breed Improvement Strategies: Are Traditional Methods Of Animal Improvement Obsolete?, L. Dale Van Vleck

Faculty Papers and Publications in Animal Science

Can the optimum animal be defined? Will that definition change over time, by location, by market demand? First, assume what may be impossible, that the perfect animal can be defined or that only a limited number of definitions of “perfect” are needed. Then, can the “perfect” animal to match a definition be found? Suppose such an animal is found. Then the question to be answered before trying to clone as a method of genetic improvement becomes “Is the animal perfect because of phenotype or genotype?” In other words, the P = G + E problem exists, which requires traditional methods of genetic ...