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Economics

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

A Benefit-Cost Analysis Decision Framework For Mitigation Of Disease Transmission At The Wildlife–Livestock Interface, Stephanie A. Shwiff, Steven J. Sweeney, Julie L. Elser, Ryan S. Miller, Matthew Farnsworth, Pauline Nol, Steven S. Shwiff, Aaron M. Anderson Jan 2016

A Benefit-Cost Analysis Decision Framework For Mitigation Of Disease Transmission At The Wildlife–Livestock Interface, Stephanie A. Shwiff, Steven J. Sweeney, Julie L. Elser, Ryan S. Miller, Matthew Farnsworth, Pauline Nol, Steven S. Shwiff, Aaron M. Anderson

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

The economics of managing disease transmission at the wildlife–livestock interface have received heightened attention as agricultural and natural resource agencies struggle to tackle growing risks to animal health. In the fiscal landscape of increased scrutiny and shrinking budgets, resource managers seek to maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of disease mitigation efforts. To address this issue, a benefit-cost analysis decision framework was developed to help users make informed choices about whether and how to target disease management efforts in wildlife and livestock populations. Within the context of this framework, we examined the conclusions of a benefit-cost analysis conducted ...


Economic Impact Of The Potential Spread Of Vampire Bats Into South Texas, Aaron M. Anderson, Steven S. Shwiff, Stephanie A. Shwiff Jan 2014

Economic Impact Of The Potential Spread Of Vampire Bats Into South Texas, Aaron M. Anderson, Steven S. Shwiff, Stephanie A. Shwiff

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

Rabies transmitted by the common vampire bat is a major public health concern in subtropical and tropical areas of Latin America, and there is some concern that the species will eventually spread into south Texas. The objective of this study was to estimate the total economic impact of the potential spread of vampire bats into south Texas. Data on livestock populations and values in the relevant counties was combined with expected mortality rates to calculate livestock losses. An IMPLAN model of the regional economy was then used to estimate the secondary impacts experienced by other businesses in the region. These ...


Estimating The Total Economic Impact Of Black Bear Peeling In Western Oregon Using Gis And Remi, Jimmy D. Taylor Ii, Anita Morzillo, Aaron M. Anderson Jan 2014

Estimating The Total Economic Impact Of Black Bear Peeling In Western Oregon Using Gis And Remi, Jimmy D. Taylor Ii, Anita Morzillo, Aaron M. Anderson

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

In parts of the Pacific Northwest, black bears emerge from winter dens with depleted fat reserves and feed on mature conifers by stripping bark and consuming sugar-rich sapwood. Peeling by bears affects commercial conifers through direct loss of the tree or degraded log quality at stand harvest. Bears generally peel trees from 15-30 years old in intensively managed forests until preferred foods such as fruits and berries are available, and a single bear can peel several trees per day. Dying trees have a signature red canopy and are detected in annual aerial forest health surveys; however, trees that scar over ...


Spillover Benefits Of Wildlife Management To Support Pheasant Populations, Aaron M. Anderson, Karen Gerhardt, Wylie T. Cross, Stephanie A. Shwiff Jan 2013

Spillover Benefits Of Wildlife Management To Support Pheasant Populations, Aaron M. Anderson, Karen Gerhardt, Wylie T. Cross, Stephanie A. Shwiff

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

Ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) and other upland game populations in Wyoming, USA, have been declining due to changes in agricultural practices, urban development, and predation. Raccoons (Procyon lotor) have been implicated as one of the main predators of pheasant nests. Management of raccoons to support pheasant populations has the direct benefit of increasing pheasant populations and additional spillover benefits to corn producers in the region may occur. We conducted a field study in southeastern Wyoming from July to October 2009 to estimate the increase in corn yield associated with raccoon trapping. Although the primary purpose of the raccoon trapping was ...


Modeling The Economic Impact Of Feral Swine-Transmitted Foot-And- Mouth Disease: A Case Study From Missouri, Tyler Cozzens, Karen Gebhardt, Stephanie A. Shwiff, Mark W. Lutman, Kerri Pedersen, Seth Swafford Jan 2010

Modeling The Economic Impact Of Feral Swine-Transmitted Foot-And- Mouth Disease: A Case Study From Missouri, Tyler Cozzens, Karen Gebhardt, Stephanie A. Shwiff, Mark W. Lutman, Kerri Pedersen, Seth Swafford

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

Invasive feral swine combine a number of characteristics (e.g., high mobility, high fecundity, destructive behavior, reservoir of diseases, etc.) that make them one of the most serious wildlife threats to American agriculture. Additionally, feral swine are susceptible to foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) infection and could play a significant role in spreading and maintaining FMD if it was introduced to the U.S. Outbreaks of FMD also have devastating economic impacts and cause the loss of billions of dollars to the agricultural economy. Problems associated with spread and control would be exacerbated if FMD was contracted and spread by feral swine ...