Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

The Marin County Livestock Protection Program: 15 Years In Review, Stephanie Larson, Devan A. Mcgranahan, Robert M. Timm Jan 2019

The Marin County Livestock Protection Program: 15 Years In Review, Stephanie Larson, Devan A. Mcgranahan, Robert M. Timm

Human–Wildlife Interactions

Predation by wild carnivores challenges livestock producers worldwide. To reduce or offset losses due to predation, a variety of predator control methods and compensation schemes have been developed. In 2001, Marin County, California, USA replaced its U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services (WS) cooperative predator damage management program with a county-run program that emphasized nonlethal methods for preventing and controlling coyote (Canis latrans) predation on domestic sheep (Ovis aries). This new Livestock Protection Program (LPP) cost-shared with livestock producers’ efforts to improve fencing, obtain and maintain guard animals, and other such nonlethal methods, and initially it compensated producers for ...


Determining Profitable Forage Rotations, J. Holman, A. Obour, A. Schlegel, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell Jan 2019

Determining Profitable Forage Rotations, J. Holman, A. Obour, A. Schlegel, T. Roberts, S. Maxwell

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Annual forages are an important crop in the High Plains, yet the region lacks recommended annual forage rotations compared to those developed for grain crops. Forages are important for the region’s livestock and dairy industries and are becoming increasingly important as irrigation capacity and grain prices decrease. Forages require less water than grain crops and may allow for increased cropping system intensity and op-opportunistic cropping. A study was initiated in 2012 at the Southwest Research-Extension Center near Garden City, KS, comparing several 1-, 3-, and 4-year forage rotations with no-tillage and minimum-tillage. Data presented are from 2013 through 2018 ...


An Examination Of The Death Penalty, Alexandra N. Kremer Dec 2018

An Examination Of The Death Penalty, Alexandra N. Kremer

The Downtown Review

The death penalty, or capital punishment, is the use of execution through hanging, beheading, drowning, gas chambers, lethal injection, and electrocution among others in response to a crime. This has spurred much debate on whether it should be used for reasons such as ethics, revenge, economics, effectiveness as a deterrent, and constitutionality. Capital punishment has roots that date back to the 18th century B.C., but, as of 2016, has been abolished in law or practice by more than two thirds of the world’s countries and several states within the United States. Here, the arguments for and against ...


Overview Of The Us Forest Service Programs And Opportunities For Partnership, Cultivating A Culture Of Success In Natural Resources: Moving Outreach Forward In Conversation, Tony Tooke Sep 2017

Overview Of The Us Forest Service Programs And Opportunities For Partnership, Cultivating A Culture Of Success In Natural Resources: Moving Outreach Forward In Conversation, Tony Tooke

Professional Agricultural Workers Journal

No abstract provided.


Dawn Of The Lawn, David M. Guy Feb 2017

Dawn Of The Lawn, David M. Guy

Exigence

Drawing on both electronic and print sources, this research seeks to explore the cultural, economic, and environmental implications of the American lawn and suggest the need to awaken a cultural discussion aimed at harmonizing one’s landscape with reality. The lawn penetrates the American’s daily life, yet few stop to examine the origins and effects of the lawn. Involving many of the leading academic voices in this subject, this work further aims to ignite a diverse discussion of the lawn’s connection to oil, fertilizers, pesticides, drinking water, and individual’s behavior. Considerable evidence supports the notion that the ...


A Benefit-Cost Analysis Decision Framework For Mitigation Of Disease Transmission At The Wildlife–Livestock Interface, Stephanie A. Shwiff, Steven J. Sweeney, Julie L. Elser, Ryan S. Miller, Matthew L. Farnsworth, Pauline Nol, Steven S. Shwiff, Aaron M. Anderson Jan 2016

A Benefit-Cost Analysis Decision Framework For Mitigation Of Disease Transmission At The Wildlife–Livestock Interface, Stephanie A. Shwiff, Steven J. Sweeney, Julie L. Elser, Ryan S. Miller, Matthew L. Farnsworth, Pauline Nol, Steven S. Shwiff, Aaron M. Anderson

Human–Wildlife Interactions

The economics of managing disease transmission at the wildlife–livestock interface have received heightened attention as agricultural and natural resource agencies struggle to tackle growing risks to animal health. In the fiscal landscape of increased scrutiny and shrinking budgets, resource managers seek to maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of disease mitigation efforts. To address this issue, a benefit-cost analysis decision framework was developed to help users make informed choices about whether and how to target disease management efforts in wildlife and livestock populations. Within the context of this framework, we examined the conclusions of a bene� t-cost analysis ...


An Exploratory Statistical Analysis Of The External And Internal Effects Of Art Museums In The United States, John Eder Aug 2015

An Exploratory Statistical Analysis Of The External And Internal Effects Of Art Museums In The United States, John Eder

Journal of Environmental and Resource Economics at Colby

An Exploratory Statistical Analysis of the External and Internal Effects of Art Museums in the United States


Brucellosis In The Greater Yellowstone Area: Disease Management At The Wildlife–Livestock Interface, Brant A. Schumaker, Dannelle E. Peck, Mandy E. Kauffman Jan 2012

Brucellosis In The Greater Yellowstone Area: Disease Management At The Wildlife–Livestock Interface, Brant A. Schumaker, Dannelle E. Peck, Mandy E. Kauffman

Human–Wildlife Interactions

Elk (Cervus elaphus) and bison (Bison bison) of the Greater Yellowstone area are the last known reservoir of bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus) in the United States. Domestic cattle occasionally contract the disease while grazing in areas where infected wild ungulates have aborted their fetuses or have given birth. Cases of brucellosis in cattle trigger costly quarantine, testing, and culling procedures. Government agencies and stakeholders, therefore, allocate valuable resources to prevent wildlife-to-cattle transmission. Scientific uncertainty about the biology, epidemiology, and economics of brucellosis makes it difficult to determine the length to which society should go to control it or the combination ...


Economic Evaluation Of Beaver Management To Protect Timber Resources In Mississippi, Stephanie A. Shwiff, Katy N. Kirkpatrick, Kris Godwin Jan 2011

Economic Evaluation Of Beaver Management To Protect Timber Resources In Mississippi, Stephanie A. Shwiff, Katy N. Kirkpatrick, Kris Godwin

Human–Wildlife Interactions

It has become essential for groups involved with wildlife policy formulation and decision making to examine the economic benefits and costs derived from the management of nuisance wildlife species. Beavers (Castor canadensis) in Mississippi have seen significant population fluctuations over the last 150 years as their status has changed from a game species to protected species to nuisance species. The objectives of this study were to assess the beaver-caused economic impacts to the timber industry in Mississippi and estimate the damages avoided due to Mississippi’s Beaver Control Assistance Program (BCAP) activities from 2005 to 2009. The total BCAP costs ...


A Guide To Pig Feeding, P Mcnamara Jan 1967

A Guide To Pig Feeding, P Mcnamara

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

FOOD is by far the greatest cost in pig production, accounting for between 60 per cent, and 75 per cent, of the total cost, and for this reason it is important that the basic principles of feeding be understood.


Rechauffe : Polite Name For Rehash, M L. Paul Jan 1962

Rechauffe : Polite Name For Rehash, M L. Paul

Journal of the Department of Agriculture, Western Australia, Series 4

ALTHOUGH every housewife tries to serve fresh foods, she often has food left over from the family meal.Rather than waste this food, she will reheat it for another meal.

This reheating of food is necessary to prevent waste, but freshly cooked foods are, of course, to be preferred from every angle for nutrition, flavour and appearance.