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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

The Marin County Livestock Protection Program: 15 Years In Review, Stephanie Larson, Devan A. Mcgranahan, Robert M. Timm Jan 2019

The Marin County Livestock Protection Program: 15 Years In Review, Stephanie Larson, Devan A. Mcgranahan, Robert M. Timm

Human–Wildlife Interactions

Predation by wild carnivores challenges livestock producers worldwide. To reduce or offset losses due to predation, a variety of predator control methods and compensation schemes have been developed. In 2001, Marin County, California, USA replaced its U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services (WS) cooperative predator damage management program with a county-run program that emphasized nonlethal methods for preventing and controlling coyote (Canis latrans) predation on domestic sheep (Ovis aries). This new Livestock Protection Program (LPP) cost-shared with livestock producers’ efforts to improve fencing, obtain and maintain guard animals, and other such nonlethal methods, and initially it compensated producers for ...


A Benefit-Cost Analysis Decision Framework For Mitigation Of Disease Transmission At The Wildlife–Livestock Interface, Stephanie A. Shwiff, Steven J. Sweeney, Julie L. Elser, Ryan S. Miller, Matthew L. Farnsworth, Pauline Nol, Steven S. Shwiff, Aaron M. Anderson Jan 2016

A Benefit-Cost Analysis Decision Framework For Mitigation Of Disease Transmission At The Wildlife–Livestock Interface, Stephanie A. Shwiff, Steven J. Sweeney, Julie L. Elser, Ryan S. Miller, Matthew L. Farnsworth, Pauline Nol, Steven S. Shwiff, Aaron M. Anderson

Human–Wildlife Interactions

The economics of managing disease transmission at the wildlife–livestock interface have received heightened attention as agricultural and natural resource agencies struggle to tackle growing risks to animal health. In the fiscal landscape of increased scrutiny and shrinking budgets, resource managers seek to maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of disease mitigation efforts. To address this issue, a benefit-cost analysis decision framework was developed to help users make informed choices about whether and how to target disease management efforts in wildlife and livestock populations. Within the context of this framework, we examined the conclusions of a bene� t-cost analysis ...


Brucellosis In The Greater Yellowstone Area: Disease Management At The Wildlife–Livestock Interface, Brant A. Schumaker, Dannelle E. Peck, Mandy E. Kauffman Jan 2012

Brucellosis In The Greater Yellowstone Area: Disease Management At The Wildlife–Livestock Interface, Brant A. Schumaker, Dannelle E. Peck, Mandy E. Kauffman

Human–Wildlife Interactions

Elk (Cervus elaphus) and bison (Bison bison) of the Greater Yellowstone area are the last known reservoir of bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus) in the United States. Domestic cattle occasionally contract the disease while grazing in areas where infected wild ungulates have aborted their fetuses or have given birth. Cases of brucellosis in cattle trigger costly quarantine, testing, and culling procedures. Government agencies and stakeholders, therefore, allocate valuable resources to prevent wildlife-to-cattle transmission. Scientific uncertainty about the biology, epidemiology, and economics of brucellosis makes it difficult to determine the length to which society should go to control it or the combination ...