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Ecology

Environmental Indicators and Impact Assessment

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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Urban Ecology, Spring/Summer 2003, Issue 8 Sep 2019

Urban Ecology, Spring/Summer 2003, Issue 8

Sustain Magazine

No abstract provided.


Human Ecology, Spring/Summer 2016, Issue 34 Sep 2019

Human Ecology, Spring/Summer 2016, Issue 34

Sustain Magazine

No abstract provided.


Molecular Fossils From Phytoplankton Reveal Secular Pco2 Trend Over The Phanerozoic, Caitlyn R. Witkowski, Johan W. H. Weijers, Brian S. Blais, Stefan Schouten, Jaap S. Sinninghe Damsté Nov 2018

Molecular Fossils From Phytoplankton Reveal Secular Pco2 Trend Over The Phanerozoic, Caitlyn R. Witkowski, Johan W. H. Weijers, Brian S. Blais, Stefan Schouten, Jaap S. Sinninghe Damsté

Science and Technology Faculty Journal Articles

Past changes in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (PCO2) have had a major impact on earth system dynamics; yet, reconstructing secular trends of past PCO2 remains a prevalent challenge in paleoclimate studies. The current long-term PCO2reconstructions rely largely on the compilation of many different proxies, often with discrepancies among proxies, particularly for periods older than 100 million years (Ma). Here, we reconstructed Phanerozoic PCO2 from a single proxy: the stable carbon isotopic fractionation associated with photosynthesis (Ɛp) that increases as PCO2 increases. This concept has been widely applied to alkenones, but here, we expand ...


A Quantitative Analysis Of The Effects Of Urbanization, Mesophication And Prescribed Burns On Oak Woodlands In The Chicago Metropolitan Area, Chad Populorum May 2018

A Quantitative Analysis Of The Effects Of Urbanization, Mesophication And Prescribed Burns On Oak Woodlands In The Chicago Metropolitan Area, Chad Populorum

Celebration of Learning

Urban expansion has had devastating impacts on forest ecosystems, especially within the past century. Human attempts to dominate nature have diminished natural disturbance regimes, which have maintained the biodiversity and historic composition of these ecosystems. Fires have been a prominent force in maintaining the structure of oak, hickory and other heliophytic (sun loving and fire-adapted) forest systems. Human induced fire suppression has led to mesophication across North America. Mesophication is the transition from drier conditions with open canopies to wetter conditions with closed canopies. These new conditions decrease the survival rates of these important species and begin to favor mesophytic ...


Weights And Balances: Integrating Models For Prevention And Response To Southern California Offshore Oil Spills, Carmen Watts Clayton, Amoret Bunn Oct 2016

Weights And Balances: Integrating Models For Prevention And Response To Southern California Offshore Oil Spills, Carmen Watts Clayton, Amoret Bunn

STAR (STEM Teacher and Researcher) Presentations

Licensing offshore oil and gas reserves in the United States waters are overseen by the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Safety and Enforcement (BSEE). The licensing application includes planning for any worst-case oil spill scenario between BSEE and the applicant based on lessons learned from historic offshore spills such as the Deepwater Horizon (2010), Exxon Valdez (1989), and the Union Oil Platform Blowout (1969). The process for planning to respond to oil spills involves coordination with multiple agencies, trustees, and stakeholders to ensure that oil spill responses consider multiple factors, including ecologically sensitive species, commercial transportation ...


The Influence Of Herbivorous Fishes On Coral Reef Communities With Low Sea Urchin Abundance: A Study Among Reef Community Types And Seasons In The Florida Keys, Emily F. Schmitt Lavin Feb 2016

The Influence Of Herbivorous Fishes On Coral Reef Communities With Low Sea Urchin Abundance: A Study Among Reef Community Types And Seasons In The Florida Keys, Emily F. Schmitt Lavin

Emily F Schmitt Lavin

Herbivores affect the species composition and quantity of algae on reefs and this in turn affects the overall benthic community structure as algae compete for space among various taxa including corals and sponges. The main groups of herbivores on reefs are sea urchins, such as Diadema antillarum (Phylum Echinodermata: Order Echinoidea) and fishes such as acanthurids and scarids (Phylum Chordata: Order Pisces). Populations of the sea urchin, Diadema antillarum suffered mass-mortality beginning in 1983 throughout the tropical northwest Atlantic and in many areas have still not returned to their pre-mortality abundances. The Florida Keys reef system supports herbivorous fishes that ...


Finding Them Before They Find Us: Informatics, Parasites, And Environments In Accelerating Climate Change, Daniel R. Brooks, Eric P. Hoberg, Walter A. Boeger, Scott Lyell Gardner, Kurt E. Galbreath, David Herczeg, Hugo H. Mejía-Madrid, S. Elizabeth Rácz, Altangerel Tsogtsaikhan Dursahinhan Jan 2014

Finding Them Before They Find Us: Informatics, Parasites, And Environments In Accelerating Climate Change, Daniel R. Brooks, Eric P. Hoberg, Walter A. Boeger, Scott Lyell Gardner, Kurt E. Galbreath, David Herczeg, Hugo H. Mejía-Madrid, S. Elizabeth Rácz, Altangerel Tsogtsaikhan Dursahinhan

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Parasites are agents of disease in humans, livestock, crops, and wildlife and are powerful representations of the ecological and historical context of the diseases they cause. Recognizing a nexus of professional opportunities and global public need, we gathered at the Cedar Point Biological Station of the University of Nebraska in September 2012 to formulate a cooperative and broad platform for providing essential information about the evolution, ecology, and epidemiology of parasites across host groups, parasite groups, geographical regions, and ecosystem types. A general protocol, documentation–assessment–monitoring–action (DAMA), suggests an integrated proposal to build a proactive capacity to understand ...


Enhancing Coastal Resilience: Perspectives On Valuing Ri Coastal Lands, Kyle Nyskohus Apr 2013

Enhancing Coastal Resilience: Perspectives On Valuing Ri Coastal Lands, Kyle Nyskohus

Honors Projects in Science and Technology

This paper discusses coastal resilience as an organizing framework for future policymaking, coastal planning, and insurance decisions, and explores the different perspectives of the value of ecosystems held by various stakeholders in Rhode Island’s coastal communities. A grounded theory approach was used in an effort to abstract general insights from the substantive but isolated areas of coastal management and economics. Special attention is given to the perspectives of municipal decision makers, the National Flood Insurance Program, natural economists, and real estate developers. We have (1) conducted a statistical analysis of environmental spending of RI towns, (2) identified key models ...


Climate And Vegetation Change In The Newberry Mountains, Southern Clark County, Nevada, Ross Joseph Guida Aug 2011

Climate And Vegetation Change In The Newberry Mountains, Southern Clark County, Nevada, Ross Joseph Guida

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

Ecological studies have shown worldwide that vegetation is being affected by climate change. Species are shifting to new elevations and physiographic positions to adapt to changes in their environment. More specifically, paleoecology studies in the Mojave Desert have shown shifting vegetation patterns in response to past warming and precipitation changes. Recent studies have shown mortality among desert plants related to extended drought and warming. However, few studies have shown how the geographic distribution of Mojave Desert species has changed during this most recent period of warming. This study addresses this gap in the literature by focusing on several plant species ...


The Distribution And Life Cycle Of Alliaria Petiolata In Lincoln, Nebraska, Caleb Pharris Jul 2011

The Distribution And Life Cycle Of Alliaria Petiolata In Lincoln, Nebraska, Caleb Pharris

Environmental Studies Undergraduate Student Theses

Alliaria petiolata (Garlic Mustard) is a biennial alien invasive plant species of the Brassicacea family. It is responsible for displacing native plant species throughout North America and its management has proven to be extremely difficult. Recently several populations of Alliaria petiolata have been discovered in southwestern Lincoln, Nebraska. The spread of Alliaria petiolata is a concern for natural resource managers and the general public. Due to the difficulty of its control, Alliaria petiolata is capable of creating monocultures which diminish the aesthetic value of an ecosystem. While most commonly found in the understory of hardwood forests, it is capable of ...


Impacts Of Shoreline Development On The Littoral Zone Of Great Pond, Problems In Environmental Science Course (Biology 493), Colby College, Colby Environmental Assessment Team, Colby College Jan 2010

Impacts Of Shoreline Development On The Littoral Zone Of Great Pond, Problems In Environmental Science Course (Biology 493), Colby College, Colby Environmental Assessment Team, Colby College

Colby College Watershed Study: Great Pond (2012, 2010, 1998)

The Colby Environmental Assessment Team (CEAT) investigated the littoral zone of Great Pond in the Belgrade Lakes region of central Maine. Data collection occurred in September and October and analysis followed in October and November of 2010. Physical, biological, and chemical parameters were assessed to examine the impacts of shoreline development on the health of the littoral community. The littoral zone and adjacent riparian areas were sampled to allow comparison of aquatic and terrestrial parameters among different levels of shoreline development.


Differential Response Of Amp Activated Protein Kinase (Ampk) And Hsp70 To Temperature Stress In The Gastropod, Nucella Lapillus, Emily Zimmermann Apr 2009

Differential Response Of Amp Activated Protein Kinase (Ampk) And Hsp70 To Temperature Stress In The Gastropod, Nucella Lapillus, Emily Zimmermann

All Theses And Dissertations

Populations of the gastropod Nucella lapillus are polymorphic for shell color, with light-colored shells predominating on warmer, wave-protected shores and dark-colored shells limited primarily to cooler, wave-exposed shores. During thermal stress, darker shells attain higher body temperatures than lighter shells. These results suggest that heat stress may determine field distribution patterns. However, there is currently little evidence of physiological consequences of thermal stress in these organisms. Following the guiding hypothesis that heat stress leads to cellular energy depletion, we explored whether the central energy regulator AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) is activated by heat stress. We compared this response in both ...


Trends In Mirex Concentration In Lake Ontario Salmonines And Sediments, Hilary L. Richardson Sep 2004

Trends In Mirex Concentration In Lake Ontario Salmonines And Sediments, Hilary L. Richardson

Environmental Science and Ecology Theses

Chinook (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and coho (0. tshawytscha) salmon and sediment cores collected from Lake Ontario during the summer and fall of 2003 were subsequently analyzed for mirex and photomirex. Mirex in fish tissue ranged from 0.011 mg/kg to 0.094 mg/kg (mean 0.048 mg/kg). Photomirex in fish ranged from 0.005 mg/kg to 0.045 mg/kg (mean 0.020 mg/kg). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to test for differences between mirex concentrations among all sampling years. A significant difference occurred between all sampling years (p=0.000). Temporal trends ...


Land Use Patterns In Relation To Lake Water Quality In The Lake George And Oaks Pond Watersheds, Problems In Environmental Science Course (Biology 493), Colby College, Colby Environmental Assessment Team, Colby College Jan 2001

Land Use Patterns In Relation To Lake Water Quality In The Lake George And Oaks Pond Watersheds, Problems In Environmental Science Course (Biology 493), Colby College, Colby Environmental Assessment Team, Colby College

Colby College Watershed Study: Other Area Studies

There has always been an inexplicable wonder associated with the beauty of Maine lakes. In addition to their aesthetic value, lakes and ponds provide important habitats for aquatic and terrestrial wildlife. The attraction of the lake's natural beauty, however, can increase recreational pressures that may lead to human induced eutrophication. Lake George and Oaks Pond were chosen as the Colby Environmental Assessment Team's (CEAT) study sites due to the concern about potential human induced eutrophication of both water bodies. Lake George and Oaks Pond are situated in southern Somerset County, Maine, and experience heavy recreational and developmental uses ...


Land Use Patterns In Relation To Lake Water Quality In The Lake Wesserunsett Watershed, Problems In Environmental Science Course (Biology 493), Colby College, Colby Environmental Assessment Team, Colby College Jan 2000

Land Use Patterns In Relation To Lake Water Quality In The Lake Wesserunsett Watershed, Problems In Environmental Science Course (Biology 493), Colby College, Colby Environmental Assessment Team, Colby College

Colby College Watershed Study: Other Area Studies

The Colby Environmental Assessment Team (CEAT) engaged in an extensive data collection and analysis effort from September to December of 2000 to produce a comprehensive evaluation of the ecological health of the Lake Wesserunsett ecosystem. CEAT examined several factors related to lake water quality, including land use within the watershed, the impacts of residential and commercial development, and physical and chemical measurements of the lake itself. Lake water quality was the primary focus of the study due to its predictive value regarding overall watershed function and viability. The accumulation of nutrients in a lake due to surface runoff and erosion ...


Land Use Patterns In Relation To Lake Water Quality In The Messalonskee Lake Watershed, Problems In Environmental Science Course (Biology 493), Colby College, Colby Environmental Assessment Team, Colby College Jan 1997

Land Use Patterns In Relation To Lake Water Quality In The Messalonskee Lake Watershed, Problems In Environmental Science Course (Biology 493), Colby College, Colby Environmental Assessment Team, Colby College

Colby College Watershed Study: Other Area Studies

The main purpose of this study is to assess the current land use patterns and their influences on the water quality of Messalonskee Lake, including the biotic and abiotic parameters which are involved. More specifically, four main objectives were proposed. First, was to calculate the water budget and flushing rate for Messalonskee Lake. Second, was to determine the influence of current and historical land use patterns on lake water quality. Third, was to utilize gathered information to construct a phosphorus model, which will enable future water quality predictions to be made. Our fourth and final objective was to make recommendations ...


Bulletin No. 34: Tidal Marshes Of Long Island Sound: Ecology, History And Restoration, Glenn D. Dreyer, William A. Niering Dec 1995

Bulletin No. 34: Tidal Marshes Of Long Island Sound: Ecology, History And Restoration, Glenn D. Dreyer, William A. Niering

Bulletins

No abstract provided.


A Resource Inventory And Impact Analysis Of Great Bog And The Horse Point Delta/Esker System, Problems In Environmental Science Course (Biology 493), Colby College, Biologists Organized For Ecosystem Assessment, Colby College Jan 1990

A Resource Inventory And Impact Analysis Of Great Bog And The Horse Point Delta/Esker System, Problems In Environmental Science Course (Biology 493), Colby College, Biologists Organized For Ecosystem Assessment, Colby College

Colby College Watershed Study: Other Area Studies

In May of 1990, Tilcon-Maine, Inc. submitted an application to mine gravel on the east side of Horse Point Road on Horse Point in the Town of Belgrade. The project site covers 46 acres and the proposed excavation covers 16 acres. An estimated 740,000 cubic yards of material will be removed over a period of six or seven years (Pfister, pers. comm.). According to Tilcon (Timson et al., 1990) the maximum depth of the pit will be 78 feet and the bottom of the pit will be a minimum of 6 feet above the water table. At the present ...


Maine's Whitewater Rapids And Their Relevance To The Critical Areas Program, Janet Mcmahon Apr 1981

Maine's Whitewater Rapids And Their Relevance To The Critical Areas Program, Janet Mcmahon

Maine Collection

Maine's Whitewater Rapids and Their Relevance to the Critical Areas Program

by Janet McMahon

Planning Report No. 74, Critical Areas Program, 184 State St., Augusta, Maine,

April, 1981 (additions made in October, 1981). Reprinted July, 1983.

Contents: Introduction / Natural History of Whitewater Rapids / Methods / Criteria / Results / Conclusions / General Evaluation of Whitewater Rapids for Inclusion on the Register of Critical Areas / Bibliography / Action Plan


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project At Dickey, Maine : Final Environmental Statement, Volume 1-4, U. S. Army Engineer Division, New England Jan 1981

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project At Dickey, Maine : Final Environmental Statement, Volume 1-4, U. S. Army Engineer Division, New England

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

The proposed Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project in northern Maine is a multipurpose installation on the St.John River. The combination hydroelectric power and flood control project is located in Aroostook County, Maine, near the Canadian border. The two proposed earth fill dams located at Dickey are 10,200 feet in length with a maximum height of 335 feet. They would impound 7.7 million acre feet of water at a maximum pool elevation 910 feet mean sea level. A second earth filled dam located 11 miles downstream at Lincoln School would serve as a regulatory dam. It would be 2100 ...


Seasonal Changes In Water Quality And Primary Productivity In Doe Valley Lake, Edmond J. Bacon, Stuart E. Neff Mar 1974

Seasonal Changes In Water Quality And Primary Productivity In Doe Valley Lake, Edmond J. Bacon, Stuart E. Neff

KWRRI Research Reports

Primary productivity and water quality were studied in Doe Valley Lake, a 147-hectare impoundment on Doe Run, a spring-fed stream in Meade County, Kentucky, from 13 June 1969 to 31 July 1972. Doe Valley Lake is monomictic during most winter seasons, but it is dimictic during more severe winters because of its morphometry and location on the borderline climatic region for dimictic lakes (37° N latitude). Oxygen depletion in the hypolimnion is severe, and anaerobic conditions usually prevail by late June. A hypolimnetic areal deficit of 0.038 mg/cm2/day was calculated. Supersaturation of oxygen in the epilimnion ...


A Preliminary Ecological Study Of Areas To Be Impounded In The Salt River Basin Of Kentucky, Louis A. Krumholz, Stuart E. Neff, Edmond J. Bacon, Jerry S. Parsons, John D. Woodling Oct 1971

A Preliminary Ecological Study Of Areas To Be Impounded In The Salt River Basin Of Kentucky, Louis A. Krumholz, Stuart E. Neff, Edmond J. Bacon, Jerry S. Parsons, John D. Woodling

KWRRI Research Reports

This report includes work that is an extension of Project No. B-005-KY as reported in Research Report No. 43 of the University of Kentucky Water Resources Institute. That project was initiated in April 1968 as Project No. A-019-KY with principal emphasis on physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the main stem of the Salt River upstream from the proposed damsite for Taylorsville Lake, an impoundment of about 3, 600 acres at seasonal pool. The report includes descriptions of an additional 13 stations along the stream, bringing to 38 the number of permanent collecting sites.

Values for dissolved oxygen ranged from ...


A Preliminary Ecological Study Of Areas To Be Impounded In The Salt River Basin Of Kentucky, Louis A. Krumholz Sep 1971

A Preliminary Ecological Study Of Areas To Be Impounded In The Salt River Basin Of Kentucky, Louis A. Krumholz

KWRRI Research Reports

This report covers work that is an extension of Project No. A-019-KY. A series of 25 sampling stations was established in the mainstream and tributaries of the Salt River that extend from the source of the stream in Boyle County to a few miles below the site of Taylorsville Darn in Spencer County. Sampling for water chemistry and biota was carried out semimonthly. Data on temperature, oxygen, depth, and discharge, along with analyses for cations (Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn) and anions (PO4, NO3, NO2, CO3, HCO3) have been accumulated and analyzed. Bottom fauna, fishes, and ...


Ecological Study Of The Effects Of Strip Mining On The Microbiology Of Streams, Ralph H. Weaver, Harry D. Nash Jan 1968

Ecological Study Of The Effects Of Strip Mining On The Microbiology Of Streams, Ralph H. Weaver, Harry D. Nash

KWRRI Research Reports

The microflora of Cane Branch of Beaver Creek in McCreary County, Kentucky, which drains an area that was strip-mined between 1955 and 1959, was studied and compared with that of Helton Branch which drains a comparable area where there has been no mining. Differences include: the establishment of Ferrcbacillus ferrooxidans, for which procedures were developed for direct colony isolation from the stream; fewer saprophytic bacteria; more numerous and more diversified filamentous and unicellular fungi; and characteristic differences in algal flora. Representatives of 42 genera of filamentous fungi were identified. Of these, 21 were isolated only from Cane Branch. Representatives of ...