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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Factors Influencing Interactions Between Ticks And Wild Birds, Amy A. Diaz May 2009

Factors Influencing Interactions Between Ticks And Wild Birds, Amy A. Diaz

Senior Honors Projects

Lyme disease, a tick-borne bacterial illness, is the most common vector-borne infection in north temperate areas worldwide. Ticks, while minute in size, can be competent vectors of both human and animal diseases. Upon hatching, larvae must take a blood meal in order to transform into the next life stage. When taking this first blood meal, the larval tick may ingest blood containing pathogens. If this occurs, the newly emerged nymphal tick is capable of transmitting infection to the next host, which can become infected and, if reservoir competent, infective. When the pathogen carrying vector is attached long enough, a host ...


Wild Bird’S-Eye View Of Influenza Virus A(H1n1), Larry Clark Jan 2009

Wild Bird’S-Eye View Of Influenza Virus A(H1n1), Larry Clark

Larry Clark

Wild bird fecal samples collected and characterized by the USDA as part of a national surveillance effort were sequenced to study the genetic relatedness of avian, swine, and human H1 and N1 subtypes. Our results find that the 2009 H1N1 human outbreak is closely related to swine virus, but falls into different clades in the H1 and N1 trees. Further, there is evidence of multiple viral genetic exchanges between birds and swine. Ongoing research across host species contributes to an understanding of the circulation of influenza viruses.


Mass Stranding Of Marine Birds Caused By A Surfactant-Producing Red Tide., David A. Jessup, Melissa A. Miller, John P. Ryan, Hannah M Nevins, Heather A. Kerkering, Abdou Mekebri, David B. Crane, Tyler A. Johnson, Raphael M. Kudela Jan 2009

Mass Stranding Of Marine Birds Caused By A Surfactant-Producing Red Tide., David A. Jessup, Melissa A. Miller, John P. Ryan, Hannah M Nevins, Heather A. Kerkering, Abdou Mekebri, David B. Crane, Tyler A. Johnson, Raphael M. Kudela

Natural Sciences and Mathematics | Faculty Scholarship

In November-December 2007 a widespread seabird mortality event occurred in Monterey Bay, California, USA, coincident with a massive red tide caused by the dinoflagellate Akashiwo sanguinea. Affected birds had a slimy yellow-green material on their feathers, which were saturated with water, and they were severely hypothermic. We determined that foam containing surfactant-like proteins, derived from organic matter of the red tide, coated their feathers and neutralized natural water repellency and insulation. No evidence of exposure to petroleum or other oils or biotoxins were found. This is the first documented case of its kind, but previous similar events may have gone ...


Plasma Cholinesterase Characteristics In Native Australian Birds: Significance For Monitoring Avian Species For Pesticide Exposure, Karen J. Fildes, Judit K. Szabo, Lee Astheimer, Michael Hooper, William A. Buttemer Jan 2009

Plasma Cholinesterase Characteristics In Native Australian Birds: Significance For Monitoring Avian Species For Pesticide Exposure, Karen J. Fildes, Judit K. Szabo, Lee Astheimer, Michael Hooper, William A. Buttemer

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides are applied throughout Australia to control agricultural pests. Blood plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity is a sensitive indicator of exposure to organophosphorus insecticides in vertebrates. To aid biomonitoring and provide reference data for wildlife pesticide-risk assessment, plasma acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activities were characterised in nine species of native bird: King Quails (Excalfactoria chinensis), Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), White-plumed Honeyeaters (Lichenostomas penicillatus), Yellow-throated Miners (Manorina flavigula), Willie Wagtails (Rhipidura leucophrys), Australian Reed-Warblers (Acrocephalus australis), Brown Songlarks (Cincloramphus cruralis), Double-barred Finches (Taeniopygia bichenovii) and Australasian Pipits (Anthus novaeseelandiae). Plasma ChE activities in all species were within the range of most ...


The Influence Of Spatial Scale On Landcover And Avian Community Relationships Within The Upper Green River Watershed, Ky, Cabrina L. Hamilton Jan 2009

The Influence Of Spatial Scale On Landcover And Avian Community Relationships Within The Upper Green River Watershed, Ky, Cabrina L. Hamilton

Honors College Capstone Experience/Thesis Projects

Landscape ecology studies are needed to aid land managers and conservationists in developing management plans that will effectively improve avian population trends. This study uses riparian avian point count survey data and landcover data to examine the possible relationships between riparian avian communities and landcover within the Upper Green River watershed. How avian-landcover relationships change with increasing spatial scale is also examined. Results showed unexpected avian-landcover relationships for specific species. A landcover gradient from open and successional habitat to closed, forest habitat was most prevalent in the study area and explained most of the variation within the avian datasets. Riparian ...


An Examination Of Songbird Avian Diversity, Abundance Trends, And Community Composition In Two Endangered Temperate Ecosystems: Riparian Willow Habitat Of The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem And A Restored Tallgrass Prairie Ecosystem, Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge, Brian Frederick Olechnowski Jan 2009

An Examination Of Songbird Avian Diversity, Abundance Trends, And Community Composition In Two Endangered Temperate Ecosystems: Riparian Willow Habitat Of The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem And A Restored Tallgrass Prairie Ecosystem, Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge, Brian Frederick Olechnowski

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

One of the central issues in avian community ecology is an understanding of diversity patterns. The diversity of birds is especially important in endangered ecosystems because birds are good indicator species, and their presence could give conservation biologists and wildlife managers clues about the overall health of these systems. I studied the richness, abundance, and community composition of songbirds in two endangered ecosystems in temperate North America, riparian willow habitat of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE), and in a restored tallgrass prairie in central Iowa, Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (Neal Smith NWR). I was especially interested in the habitat ...


An Updated Catalogue Of The Birds From The Carpinteria Asphalt, Pleistocene Of California, Daniel A. Guthrie Jan 2009

An Updated Catalogue Of The Birds From The Carpinteria Asphalt, Pleistocene Of California, Daniel A. Guthrie

Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences

Published accounts of the Carpinteria avifauna, collected from an upper Pleistocene asphalt deposit near Carpinteria, California, were based on only a small portion of the collection. The present paper is a complete review of the avifauna, including information on previously unpublished and unidentified material. The avifauna contains 79 species, twenty-seven of which have been added to the published avifauna from the deposits. Included among these are the first fossil records of Rallus limicola, Tringa melanoleuca, Tyrannus verticalis, and Piranga ludoviciana. Specimens from the deposit previously assigned to Corvus caurinus are referred to C. brachyrhynchos.