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Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2019

Climate change

School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science Publications

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Adaptation Strategies And Approaches For Forested Watersheds, P. Danielle Shannon, Christopher Swanston, Maria Janowiak, Stephen D. Handler, Kristen M. Schmitt, Leslie A. Brandt, Patricia Butler-Leopold Feb 2019

Adaptation Strategies And Approaches For Forested Watersheds, P. Danielle Shannon, Christopher Swanston, Maria Janowiak, Stephen D. Handler, Kristen M. Schmitt, Leslie A. Brandt, Patricia Butler-Leopold

School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science Publications

Intentional climate adaptation planning for ecosystems has become a necessary part of the job for natural resource managers and natural resource professionals in this era of non-stationarity. One of the major challenges in adapting ecosystems to climate change is in the translation of broad adaptation concepts to specific, tangible actions. Addressing management goals and values while considering the long-term risks associated with local climate change can make forested watershed management plans more robust to uncertainty and changing conditions. We provide a menu of tiered adaptation strategies, which we developed with a focus on forests of the Midwest and Northeastern U ...


Iron (Oxyhydr)Oxides Serve As Phosphate Traps In Tundra And Boreal Peat Soils, Elizabeth M. Herndon, Lauren Kinsman-Costello, Kiersten A. Duroe, Jonathan Mills, Evan Kane, Stephen D. Sebestyen, Aaron A. Thompson, Stan D. Wullschleger Jan 2019

Iron (Oxyhydr)Oxides Serve As Phosphate Traps In Tundra And Boreal Peat Soils, Elizabeth M. Herndon, Lauren Kinsman-Costello, Kiersten A. Duroe, Jonathan Mills, Evan Kane, Stephen D. Sebestyen, Aaron A. Thompson, Stan D. Wullschleger

School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science Publications

Arctic and boreal ecosystems are experiencing pronounced warming that is accelerating decomposition of soil organic matter and releasing greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. Future carbon storage in these ecosystems depends on the balance between microbial decomposition and primary production, both of which can be regulated by nutrients such as phosphorus. Phosphorus cycling in tundra and boreal regions is often assumed to occur through biological pathways with little interaction with soil minerals; that is, phosphate released from organic molecules is rapidly assimilated by plants or microorganisms. In contrast to this prevailing conceptual model, we use sequential extractions and spectroscopic techniques to ...