Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Plant Mitochondrial Genome Evolution And Structure Has Been Shaped By Double-Strand Break Repair And Recombination, Emily Wynn Apr 2019

Plant Mitochondrial Genome Evolution And Structure Has Been Shaped By Double-Strand Break Repair And Recombination, Emily Wynn

Dissertations and Theses in Biological Sciences

Plant mitochondrial genomes are large but contain a small number of genes. These genes have very low mutation rates, but genomes rearrange and expand at significant rates. We propose that much of the apparent complexity of plant mitochondrial genomes can be explained by the interactions of double-strand break repair, recombination, and selection. One possible explanation for the disparity between the low mutation rates of genes and the high divergence of non-genes is that synonymous mutations in genes are not truly neutral. In some species, rps14 has been duplicated in the nucleus, allowing the mitochondrial copy to become a pseudogene. By ...


Regulation Of Vaccinia Virus Replication: A Story Of Viral Mimicry And A Novel Antagonistic Relationship Between Vaccinia Kinase And Pseudokinase, Annabel T. Olson Apr 2019

Regulation Of Vaccinia Virus Replication: A Story Of Viral Mimicry And A Novel Antagonistic Relationship Between Vaccinia Kinase And Pseudokinase, Annabel T. Olson

Dissertations and Theses in Biological Sciences

Poxviruses employ sophisticated signaling pathways that thwart cellular defense mechanisms and simultaneously ensure viral factors are modulated properly. Yet, our understanding of these complex signaling networks are incomplete. For example, the vaccinia B1 kinase plays a vital role in inactivating the cellular antiviral factor BAF, and is suggested to orchestrate other pathways. B1 is highly conserved among poxviruses and exhibits a remarkable degree of similarity to VRKs, a family of cellular kinases, suggesting that the viral enzyme has evolved to mimic VRK activity. Indeed, B1 and VRKs have been demonstrated to target a shared substrate, the DNA binding protein BAF ...