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Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2019

University of Massachusetts Medical School

Cellular and Molecular Physiology

Transcription factor

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Mtf1, A Classic Metal Sensing Transcription Factor, Promotes Myogenesis In Response To Copper, Cristina Tavera-Montañez, Sarah J. Hainer, Daniella Cangussu, Shellaina J. V. Gordon, Yao Xiao, Pablo Reyes-Gutierrez, Anthony N. Imbalzano, Juan G. Navea, Thomas G. Fazzio, Teresita Padilla-Benavides Jun 2019

Mtf1, A Classic Metal Sensing Transcription Factor, Promotes Myogenesis In Response To Copper, Cristina Tavera-Montañez, Sarah J. Hainer, Daniella Cangussu, Shellaina J. V. Gordon, Yao Xiao, Pablo Reyes-Gutierrez, Anthony N. Imbalzano, Juan G. Navea, Thomas G. Fazzio, Teresita Padilla-Benavides

University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

MTF1 is a conserved metal-binding transcription factor in eukaryotes that binds to conserved DNA sequence motifs, termed metal response elements (MREs). MTF1 responds to metal excess and deprivation, protects cells from oxidative and hypoxic stresses, and is required for embryonic development in vertebrates. We used multiple strategies to identify an unappreciated role for MTF1 and copper (Cu) in cell differentiation. Upon initiation of myogenesis from primary myoblasts, MTF1 expression increased, as did nuclear localization. Mtf1 knockdown impaired differentiation, while addition of non-toxic concentrations of Cu+ enhanced MTF1 expression and promoted myogenesis. Cu+ bound stoichiometrically to a C-terminus tetra-cysteine of MTF1 ...


A Persistence Detector For Metabolic Network Rewiring In An Animal, Jote T. Bulcha, Gabrielle E. Giese, Zulfikar Ali, Yong-Uk Lee, Melissa D. Walker, Amy D. Holdorf, L. Safak Yilmaz, Robert C. Brewster, Albertha J. M. Walhout Jan 2019

A Persistence Detector For Metabolic Network Rewiring In An Animal, Jote T. Bulcha, Gabrielle E. Giese, Zulfikar Ali, Yong-Uk Lee, Melissa D. Walker, Amy D. Holdorf, L. Safak Yilmaz, Robert C. Brewster, Albertha J. M. Walhout

Open Access Articles

Biological systems must possess mechanisms that prevent inappropriate responses to spurious environmental inputs. Caenorhabditis elegans has two breakdown pathways for the short-chain fatty acid propionate: a canonical, vitamin B12-dependent pathway and a propionate shunt that is used when vitamin B12 levels are low. The shunt pathway is kept off when there is sufficient flux through the canonical pathway, likely to avoid generating shunt-specific toxic intermediates. Here, we discovered a transcriptional regulatory circuit that activates shunt gene expression upon propionate buildup. Nuclear hormone receptor 10 (NHR-10) and NHR-68 function together as a "persistence detector" in a type 1, coherent feed-forward loop ...