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Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2019

University of Massachusetts Medical School

Cellular and Molecular Physiology

Obesity

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Coronary Disease Is Not Associated With Robust Alterations In Inflammatory Gene Expression In Human Epicardial Fat, Timothy P. Fitzgibbons, Nancy Lee, Khanh-Van T. Tran, Sarah M. Nicoloro, Mark Kelly, Stanley Kc Tam, Michael P. Czech Oct 2019

Coronary Disease Is Not Associated With Robust Alterations In Inflammatory Gene Expression In Human Epicardial Fat, Timothy P. Fitzgibbons, Nancy Lee, Khanh-Van T. Tran, Sarah M. Nicoloro, Mark Kelly, Stanley Kc Tam, Michael P. Czech

Open Access Articles

Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is the visceral fat depot of the heart. Inflammation of EAT is thought to contribute to coronary artery disease (CAD). Therefore, we hypothesized that the EAT of patients with CAD would have increased inflammatory gene expression compared with controls without CAD. Cardiac surgery patients with (n = 13) or without CAD (n = 13) were consented, and samples of EAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) were obtained. Transcriptomic analysis was performed using Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST arrays. Differential expression was defined as a 1.5-fold change (ANOVA P < 0.05). Six hundred ninety-three genes were differentially expressed between SAT and EAT in controls and 805 in cases. Expression of 326 genes was different between EAT of cases and controls; expression of 14 genes was increased in cases, while 312 were increased in controls. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR confirmed that there was no difference in expression of CCL2, CCR2, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-8, and PAI1 between groups. Immunohistochemistry showed more macrophages in EAT than SAT, but there was no difference in their number or activation state between groups. In contrast to prior studies, we did not find increased inflammatory gene expression in the EAT of patients with CAD. We conclude that the specific adipose tissue depot, rather than CAD status, is responsible for the majority of differential gene expression.


High-Fat Diet In A Mouse Insulin-Resistant Model Induces Widespread Rewiring Of The Phosphotyrosine Signaling Network, Antje Dittmann, Norman J. Kennedy, Nina L. Soltero, Nader Morshed, Miyeko D. Mana, Omer H. Yilmaz, Roger J. Davis, Forest M. White Aug 2019

High-Fat Diet In A Mouse Insulin-Resistant Model Induces Widespread Rewiring Of The Phosphotyrosine Signaling Network, Antje Dittmann, Norman J. Kennedy, Nina L. Soltero, Nader Morshed, Miyeko D. Mana, Omer H. Yilmaz, Roger J. Davis, Forest M. White

Open Access Articles

Obesity-associated type 2 diabetes and accompanying diseases have developed into a leading human health risk across industrialized and developing countries. The complex molecular underpinnings of how lipid overload and lipid metabolites lead to the deregulation of metabolic processes are incompletely understood. We assessed hepatic post-translational alterations in response to treatment of cells with saturated and unsaturated free fatty acids and the consumption of a high-fat diet by mice. These data revealed widespread tyrosine phosphorylation changes affecting a large number of enzymes involved in metabolic processes as well as canonical receptor-mediated signal transduction networks. Targeting two of the most prominently affected ...


A Receptor Of The Immunoglobulin Superfamily Regulates Adaptive Thermogenesis, Carmen Hurtado Del Pozo, Randall H. Friedline, Hye Lim Noh, Jason K. Kim, Ann Marie. Schmidt Jul 2019

A Receptor Of The Immunoglobulin Superfamily Regulates Adaptive Thermogenesis, Carmen Hurtado Del Pozo, Randall H. Friedline, Hye Lim Noh, Jason K. Kim, Ann Marie. Schmidt

Open Access Articles

Exquisite regulation of energy homeostasis protects from nutrient deprivation but causes metabolic dysfunction upon nutrient excess. In human and murine adipose tissue, the accumulation of ligands of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) accompanies obesity, implicating this receptor in energy metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that mice bearing global- or adipocyte-specific deletion of Ager, the gene encoding RAGE, display superior metabolic recovery after fasting, a cold challenge, or high-fat feeding. The RAGE-dependent mechanisms were traced to suppression of protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of its key targets, hormone-sensitive lipase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, upon beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation-processes ...