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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

A Socio-Ecological Approach To Wildlife Disease Risk, James A. Elliott May 2019

A Socio-Ecological Approach To Wildlife Disease Risk, James A. Elliott

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Many Eastern moose (Alces alces, Linnaeus; 1758) populations along the southern edge of their North American range are declining, including those in Minnesota, Vermont, and New Hampshire. More recently, in Maine, winter ticks (Dermacentor albipictus; Packard 1869) are suspected to also be influencing the population through periodic widespread mortality of calves. While metabolic stress from heavy winter tick parasitism has been implicated in these moose population declines, little is known about the relative effects of tick-borne diseases, which may compound metabolic stress. Tick-borne pathogens known to infect cervid species include Anaplasma species, a group of bacteria that cause a disease ...


Productivity, Costs, And Best Management Practices For Major Timber Harvesting Frameworks In Maine, Harikrishnan Soman May 2019

Productivity, Costs, And Best Management Practices For Major Timber Harvesting Frameworks In Maine, Harikrishnan Soman

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Though the timber harvesting industry in Maine ranges over two centuries, the state has more forest cover than a century ago. Currently, some of the crucial challenges faced by the forest management industry in Maine and elsewhere in the northeastern US are increasing costs of forest operations, diminishing monetary returns and falling markets.

The major goal of this study was to evaluate the production economics of timber harvesting frameworks under different silvicultural prescriptions common to the region. For which, two field studies were conducted at two different locations in Maine, US. The first field study (Study I) was conducted in ...


Improving Conservation Of Declining Young Forest Birds Through Adaptive Management, Anna Buckardt Thomas Apr 2019

Improving Conservation Of Declining Young Forest Birds Through Adaptive Management, Anna Buckardt Thomas

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Early successional forest and shrubland habitats are collectively called young forest. Changes in disturbance regimes and land use conversion resulted in declines of young forest and associated wildlife across eastern North America. Conservation of declining young forest birds relies on the maintenance and creation of young forest habitats used for breeding. American Woodcock (AMWO; Scolopax minor) and Golden-winged Warbler (GWWA; Vermivora chrysoptera) are two declining young forest species. Conservation plans for both species use an adaptive management framework, which is an iterative process of planning, management actions, and monitoring and evaluation, in the context of species conservation goals. Adaptive management ...