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2019

California State University, Monterey Bay

Race discrimination

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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Chinese Immigration-Exclusion Pamphlets, Volume Iv, 1855-1908 Feb 2019

Chinese Immigration-Exclusion Pamphlets, Volume Iv, 1855-1908

Chinese Pamphlets

Nine pamphlets published between 1855 and 1908 regarding Chinese in the United States and, in particular, in California, containing arguments for and against the Chinese being in America, past relations with the Chinese, describing the Chinese as heathens and a continuation of the claims made against the Chinese in the first three volumes of Chinese Immigration-Exclusion Pamphlets.


2019 - Chinese Pamphlets On Immigration And Exclusion - Inventory - Draft Feb 2019

2019 - Chinese Pamphlets On Immigration And Exclusion - Inventory - Draft

Chinese Immigration-Exclusion Pamphlet Inventory

An inventory of a group of pamphlets published from 1855 through 1929 detailing the perceived problems associated with the Chinese in America, the efforts made to deprive Chinese rights granted others including citizenship, the depiction of Chinese as inferior humans in terms of intellect and morals standing, the inability of Chinese to assimilate into the American culture, laws enacted to limit the ability of Chinese to participate in the economy, anti-Chinese organizations, speeches before various legislative bodies in opposition to the Chinese, Chinese responses to the anti-Chinese publications, and responses by religious organizations on the subject of race and equality ...


Chinese Immigration-Exclusion Pamphlets, Volume Iii, 1857-1902 Feb 2019

Chinese Immigration-Exclusion Pamphlets, Volume Iii, 1857-1902

Chinese Pamphlets

Eleven pamphlets published between 1857 and 1902 regarding the treatment of the exempt classes of Chinese in the United States, arguments in favor of immigration with measurers recommended by the Immigration Union, the church and the Chinese, competition with Chinese and the necessity of a stringent exclusion clause, and letters written by members of the Chinese community on the Chinese question.


Chinese Immigration-Exclusion Pamphlets, Volume Ii, 1870-1906 Feb 2019

Chinese Immigration-Exclusion Pamphlets, Volume Ii, 1870-1906

Chinese Pamphlets

Eight pamphlets published between 1870 and 1906 consisting of topics such as the treatment of the exempt classes of Chinese in the United States, Chinese immigration, Chinese mining license tax, the evils of the Mongolian immigration, the “true sentiments” of the Republican Party of California on the Chinese question, the nature and effect of the competition by Chinese with American labor, the church and Chinese immigration, cholera in San Francisco and the conflict of the races.


Chinese Immigration-Exclusion Pamphlets, Volume I, 1876-1914 Feb 2019

Chinese Immigration-Exclusion Pamphlets, Volume I, 1876-1914

Chinese Pamphlets

Seventeen pamphlets published between 1876 and 1914 that set forth the pros and cons of Chinese immigration into the United States, including arguments as to why the Chinese should be excluded. Those claims were in part that the Chinese being non-assimilative, undesirable, destructive to competition and hence the need to protect American labor and White citizens. The Chinese were blamed for the spread of slavery, criminal activities, highbinders (assassins), opium smoking, leprosy and other imported evils and the overall corruption of California.


Japanese Pamphlets, Volume Iv, 1907-1925 Feb 2019

Japanese Pamphlets, Volume Iv, 1907-1925

Japanese Pamphlets

Ten politically oriented pamphlets published between 1907 to 1925 that set forth largely anti-Japanese contentions against those residing in the United States and California. The White population continued to be concerned about the mixing of races and wanted additional laws that not only excluded the Japanese who were living in the United States (including children born in the United States) from citizenship but also from leasing or owning land. The arguments found in the first three volumes of pamphlets continued on into Volume IV including a V.H. McClatchy’s 1925 pamphlet entitled: “Guarding the Immigration Gates: What Has Been ...


Japanese Pamphlets, Volume I, 1906-1914 Feb 2019

Japanese Pamphlets, Volume I, 1906-1914

Japanese Pamphlets

Nineteen politically oriented pamphlets published between 1906 to 1914 that set forth the pros and cons of Japanese continuing to reside in the United States and California. The White population was particularly concerned about the mixing of races and wanted laws that not only excluded the Japanese who were living in the United States (including children born in the United States) from citizenship but also from leasing or owning land. Those who were anti-Japanese described the Japanese as an inferior race incapable of assimilating into the White population. The pamphlets in this volume also include responses from the Japan Society ...


Japanese Pamphlets, Volume Ii, 1912-1920 Feb 2019

Japanese Pamphlets, Volume Ii, 1912-1920

Japanese Pamphlets

Twenty-nine politically oriented pamphlets published between 1912-1929 set forth the pros and cons of Japanese continuing to reside in the United States and California. The White population was particularly concerned about the mixing of races and wanted laws that not only excluded the Japanese who were living in the United States (including children born in the United States) from citizenship but also from leasing or owning land. Arguments used against the Japanese living in America included claims of surreptitious entries (e.g., being smuggled in through Mexico), Japanese use of “Picture Prides, Japanese efforts to control the soil, Japanese use ...


Japanese Pamphlets, Volume Iii, 1918-1925 Feb 2019

Japanese Pamphlets, Volume Iii, 1918-1925

Japanese Pamphlets

Twenty-two politically oriented pamphlets published between 1906 to 1914 that set forth the pros and cons of Japanese continuing to reside in the United States and California. The White population was particularly concerned about the mixing of races and wanted laws that not only excluded the Japanese who were living in the United States (including children born in the United States) from citizenship but also from leasing or owning land. Those who were anti-Japanese described the Japanese as an inferior race incapable of assimilating into the White population and includes a pamphlet entitled “Preliminary Report of the Mental Capacity of ...