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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Self-Myofascial Release Does Not Improve Back Squat Range Of Motion, Alter Muscle Activation, Or Aid In Perceived Recovery 24-Hours Following Lower Body Resistance Training., Zach M. Beier, Ian L. Earp, John A. Korak May 2019

Self-Myofascial Release Does Not Improve Back Squat Range Of Motion, Alter Muscle Activation, Or Aid In Perceived Recovery 24-Hours Following Lower Body Resistance Training., Zach M. Beier, Ian L. Earp, John A. Korak

International Journal of Exercise Science

International Journal of Exercise Science 12(3): 839-846, 2019. Self-myofascial release (SMR) is an alternative therapy believed to increase myofascial mobility by exciting muscles and increasing blood flow to the treated area. Previous literature suggest SMR produces conflicting results on performance, muscle activation, range of motion (ROM), and recovery. This study was designed to utilize SMR on a fatigued individual prior to exercise and measure its’ effects on muscle activation, ROM, and perceived recovery compared to a dynamic warm-up session. The findings could help develop an efficient warm-up protocol for resistance-trained individuals. Electromyography (EMG) measured muscle activation of the rectus ...


The Impact Of Power Training On Balance And Visual Feedback Removal, Juliana Bouton Apr 2019

The Impact Of Power Training On Balance And Visual Feedback Removal, Juliana Bouton

Senior Honors Theses

Because power training has been known to augment stability, the purpose of this study was to assess whether the removal of visual input affects lower limb muscle power production in young women who are resistance trained to the same degree it affects the untrained. This provided insight as far as the need for resistance training protocols in a largely untrained visually impaired population. To study this, fourteen college-aged female participants (18-23 years) performed a seated double-leg press on a leg sled machine, isolating power production of the lower limbs. After establishing baselines, which involved finding an average of power produced ...


The Impact Of Power Training On Balance And Visual Feedback Removal, Juliana Bouton Apr 2019

The Impact Of Power Training On Balance And Visual Feedback Removal, Juliana Bouton

Juliana Bouton

Because power training has been known to augment stability, the purpose of this study was to assess whether the removal of visual input affects lower limb muscle power production in young women who are resistance trained to the same degree it affects the untrained. This provided insight as far as the need for resistance training protocols in a largely untrained visually impaired population. To study this, fourteen college-aged female participants (18-23 years) performed a seated double-leg press on a leg sled machine, isolating power production of the lower limbs. After establishing baselines, which involved finding an average of power ...


The Effects Of Deep Oscillation Therapy For Individuals With Lower-Leg Pain, Mccall E. Christian, Riley C. Koenig, Zachary K. Winkelmann, Kenneth E. Games Mar 2019

The Effects Of Deep Oscillation Therapy For Individuals With Lower-Leg Pain, Mccall E. Christian, Riley C. Koenig, Zachary K. Winkelmann, Kenneth E. Games

Journal of Sports Medicine and Allied Health Sciences: Official Journal of the Ohio Athletic Trainers Association

Purpose: Lower extremity (LE) pain accounts for 13-20% of injuries in the active population. LE pain has been contributed to inflexibility and fascial restrictions. Deep oscillation therapy (DOT) has been proposed to improve range of motion and reduce pain following musculoskeletal injuries. Therefore, our objective was to determine the effectiveness of DOT on ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) and pain in individuals with and without lower-leg pain. Methods: We used a single blind, pre-post experimental study in a research laboratory. Thirty-two active participants completed this study. Sixteen individuals reporting lower-leg pain and sixteen non-painful individuals completed the study. Participants ...