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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Movement Patterns Of Brook Trout In A Restored Coastal Stream System In Southern Massachusetts, Erin L. Snook Jan 2014

Movement Patterns Of Brook Trout In A Restored Coastal Stream System In Southern Massachusetts, Erin L. Snook

Masters Theses 1911 - February 2014

Populations of anadromous brook trout can be found from northern Canada into New England. It is believed that the extent of anadromy exhibited by coastal brook trout populations decreases with latitude, but the ecology and movements of the more southern populations are less studied. A 33-month acoustic telemetry study of anadromous brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) was conducted in a restored coastal stream and adjacent marine system in southeastern Massachusetts. Movement and migration patterns of 54 brook trout were investigated for individual differences and common features. Individuals exhibited a range of movement patterns. Some were more resident and only moved short ...


Trans-Gulf Of Mexico Loop Migration Of Tree Swallows Revealed By Solar Geolocation, David W. Bradley, Robert G. Clark, Peter O. Dunn, Andrew J. Laughlin, Caz M. Taylor, Carol M. Vleck, Linda A. Whittingham, David W. Winkler, D. Ryan Norris Jan 2014

Trans-Gulf Of Mexico Loop Migration Of Tree Swallows Revealed By Solar Geolocation, David W. Bradley, Robert G. Clark, Peter O. Dunn, Andrew J. Laughlin, Caz M. Taylor, Carol M. Vleck, Linda A. Whittingham, David W. Winkler, D. Ryan Norris

Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology Publications

One of the greatest feats of avian migration is the non-stop crossing of extensive areas of inhospitable habitat such as deserts and seas. Differences in spring and autumn migration routes have been reported in species that cross such barriers, and are thought to have evolved in response to seasonal variation in prevailing wind direction. We tested the hypothesis that migration routes vary seasonally with respect to the Gulf of Mexico in the tree swallow Tachycineta bicolor using solar geolocators attached and retrieved at 4 breeding sites in central North America. We found that 100 % of birds (n = 10) made a ...