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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Saccharomyces Cerevisiae-Based Molecular Tool Kit For Manipulation Of Genes From Gram-Negative Bacteria, Robert M. Q. Shanks, Nicky C. Caiazza, Shannon M. Hinsa, Christine M. Toutain, George A. O'Toole Jul 2006

Saccharomyces Cerevisiae-Based Molecular Tool Kit For Manipulation Of Genes From Gram-Negative Bacteria, Robert M. Q. Shanks, Nicky C. Caiazza, Shannon M. Hinsa, Christine M. Toutain, George A. O'Toole

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

A tool kit of vectors was designed to manipulate and express genes from a wide range of gram-negative species by using in vivo recombination. Saccharomyces cerevisiae can use its native recombination proteins to combine several amplicons in a single transformation step with high efficiency. We show that this technology is particularly useful for vector design. Shuttle, suicide, and expression vectors useful in a diverse group of bacteria are described and utilized. This report describes the use of these vectors to mutate clpX and clpP of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and to explore their roles in biofilm formation and surface ...


Bacillus Anthracis Virulent Plasmid Px02 Genes Found In Large Plasmids Of Two Other Bacillus Species, Vicki A. Luna, Debra S. King, K. Kealy Peak, Frank Reeves, Lea Heberlein-Larson, William Veguilla, L. Heller, Kathleen E. Duncan, Andrew C. Cannons, Philip Amuso, Jacqueline Cattani Jul 2006

Bacillus Anthracis Virulent Plasmid Px02 Genes Found In Large Plasmids Of Two Other Bacillus Species, Vicki A. Luna, Debra S. King, K. Kealy Peak, Frank Reeves, Lea Heberlein-Larson, William Veguilla, L. Heller, Kathleen E. Duncan, Andrew C. Cannons, Philip Amuso, Jacqueline Cattani

Bioelectrics Publications

In order to cause the disease anthrax, Bacillus anthracis requires two plasmids, pX01 and pX02, which carry toxin and capsule genes, respectively, that are used as genetic targets in the laboratory detection of the bacterium. Clinical, forensic, and environmental samples that test positive by PCR protocols established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for B. anthracis are considered to be potentially B. anthracis until confirmed by culture and a secondary battery of tests. We report the presence of 10 genes (acpA, capA, capB, capC, capR, capD, IS1627, ORF 48, ORF 61, and repA) and the sequence for the ...