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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

A Brief History Of Oyster Aquaculture In Rhode Island, Michael Rice Nov 2006

A Brief History Of Oyster Aquaculture In Rhode Island, Michael Rice

Michael A Rice

The history of the development of oyster aquaculture is reviewed, beginning with pre-colonial shellfishing by the Native American Narragansetts and Wampanoags of Narragansett Bay. Leasing of estuarine waters for aquaculture of oysters began with legislation by the Rhode Island General Assembly before the turn of the 19th Century. Legal developments during the 19th Century led to the expansion of oyster aquaculture to the point that about 21,000 acres of Rhode Island's estuarine and coastal waters were leased for oyster farming by 1910. Industrialization, sewage pollution, siltation, the Hurricane of 1938 and socio-political changes in the 1920s and 1930s ...


Size Selectivity Of Purse Seines In The Southern Philippines Multispecies Tuna Fisheries, Michael A. Rice, Joseph T. Dealteris, Samuel E. Resma Dec 2005

Size Selectivity Of Purse Seines In The Southern Philippines Multispecies Tuna Fisheries, Michael A. Rice, Joseph T. Dealteris, Samuel E. Resma

Michael A Rice

The multi-species Philippine tuna purse seine fishery targets three tuna species: skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) and bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus). These are highly migratory pelagic fishes that grow to different maximum lengths and weights. At present there is no mesh size regulation specific to the fishery in the Philippines although tuna purse seines generally use 8.9cm (3.5 in) mesh size in the bunt of the net. An empirical analysis was conducted to compare the catches of purse seine nets with two different mesh sizes in the top portion of the bunt: 8.9cm and 12 ...


Aquaculture In Tanzania, Michael A. Rice, Aviti J. Mmochi, Lugazo Zubieri, Rebecca M. Savoie Dec 2005

Aquaculture In Tanzania, Michael A. Rice, Aviti J. Mmochi, Lugazo Zubieri, Rebecca M. Savoie

Michael A Rice

Aquaculture in Tanzania is represented primarily by the culture if seaweeds, Kappaphycus alvarezi and Eucheuma denticulatum as source of carageenan for food additives. During the 1950s, there was considerable effort to establish freshwater pond culture of tilapia in the country, but the projects proved to be unfeasible due to robust capture fisheries in lakes and rivers and a lack of transportation and infrastructure to access distant markets. There has been some culture of penaeid shrmp in brackish ponds, and renewed interest in pond culture of tilapia. A number of species are being cultured experimentally, including milkfish, giant clams (Tridacna gigas ...