Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2006

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Articles 1 - 30 of 44

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Managing Phosphorus In Beef Feedlot Operations, William F. Kissinger, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Richard K. Koelsch Jan 2006

Managing Phosphorus In Beef Feedlot Operations, William F. Kissinger, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Richard K. Koelsch

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

A commercial feedlot study determined manure nutrient flow in six feedlots using a corn and by-product based diet with an average P content of 0.39% (DM basis), and a range of 0.34 to 0.48%. Mass balances for N and P were conducted on each pen. The average feed nutrient intake was 0.52 lb N/head/day (64.0 + 7.6 lb/animal fed) and 0.09 lb P/head/day (10.9 + 2.2 lb/animal fed). Based upon averages from the 6,366 head of cattle, 11.5% of the feed nitrogen and 16.9 ...


The Influence Of Cooking Rate And Holding Time On Beef Flavor, Jennie M. James, Chris R. Calkins Jan 2006

The Influence Of Cooking Rate And Holding Time On Beef Flavor, Jennie M. James, Chris R. Calkins

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Seven muscles from 10 beef carcasses were cooked quickly or slowly and held 0 or 1 hour to explore the influence of cooking rate and holding time on beef flavor. Off-flavor intensity was lowest when beef was cooked slowly (on a 300°F grill instead of a 480°F grill) and when it was held for 1 hour prior to sensory evaluation. The infraspinatus (flat iron) had the least intense off-flavor and the vastus intermedius (knuckle bottom) had the most intense off-flavor. Slow cooking or holding for 1 hour prior to consumption reduced the intensity of off-flavor in value cuts.


Vaccination For Escherichia Coli O157:H7 In Market Ready Feedlot Cattle, Robert Peterson, David R. Smith, Rodney A. Moxley, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Galen E. Erickson, Susan Hinkley Jan 2006

Vaccination For Escherichia Coli O157:H7 In Market Ready Feedlot Cattle, Robert Peterson, David R. Smith, Rodney A. Moxley, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Galen E. Erickson, Susan Hinkley

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

A clinical trial was conducted during the summer of 2004 to evaluate the effects of vaccinating cattle against Escherichia coli on the probability of detecting E. coli O157:H7 in feces and colonization at the terminal rectum. The probability for vaccinated or nonvaccinated cattle to shed E. coli O157:H7 in feces was not significantly different. However, the probability for steers to be colonized by E. coli O157:H7 in the terminal rectum was greatly reduced for vaccinated (0.3%) compared with nonvaccinated (20.0%) steers. We concluded that the vaccine was effective at reducing colonization of E. coli O157 ...


Livestock Risk Protection Insurance Vs. Futures Hedging: Basis Risk Implications, Rik R. Smith, Darrell R. Mark, Allen L. Prosch Jan 2006

Livestock Risk Protection Insurance Vs. Futures Hedging: Basis Risk Implications, Rik R. Smith, Darrell R. Mark, Allen L. Prosch

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

This study analyzes the benefit of Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) insurance to cattle producers in reducing basis risk. Nebraska producers insuring fed cattle with LRP realize a basis risk reduction of one-third to one-half compared to futures or options hedging. Nebraska feeder cattle producers using LRP experience only a slight reduction in basis risk. Reduced basis risk results in smaller errors when forecasting basis levels for future time periods. With more accurate basis forecasts, producers can better estimate net hedged selling prices and, consequently, future cash flows.


Bull Exposure, When Combined With A Seven-Day Mga Synchronization, Does Not Enhance Conception Rates In Cows, Michelle M. Baltes, Rebecca C. Bott, Ryann Mcfee, Joseph S. Schulz, Candice F. Toombs, Jeffrey W. Bergman, Karl V. Moline, Andrea S. Cupp Jan 2006

Bull Exposure, When Combined With A Seven-Day Mga Synchronization, Does Not Enhance Conception Rates In Cows, Michelle M. Baltes, Rebecca C. Bott, Ryann Mcfee, Joseph S. Schulz, Candice F. Toombs, Jeffrey W. Bergman, Karl V. Moline, Andrea S. Cupp

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

The purpose of the current experiments was to determine if cows exposed to sterile bulls (epididyectomized) in combination with a 7-day MGA treatment would have an advantage in conception rates to cows not exposed to bulls. Bull exposure increased percentage of cows cycling prior to synchronization and reduced the time from calving to initiation of cycling. Overall there was not an increase in conception rates to timed TAI or in total pregnancy rates in bull exposed MGA treated cows when compared to cows not exposed to bulls.


Influence Of Dried Distillers Grains Supplementation Frequency On Forage Digestibility And Growth Performance, Leslie Aaron Stalker, Don C. Adams, Terry J. Klopfenstein Jan 2006

Influence Of Dried Distillers Grains Supplementation Frequency On Forage Digestibility And Growth Performance, Leslie Aaron Stalker, Don C. Adams, Terry J. Klopfenstein

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Two experiments evaluated the influence of dried distillers grains supplementation frequency on forage digestibility and growth of yearling steers. In Exp. 1, treatments were dried distillers grains fed at 16.7% of the diet either daily, every other day or every third day. Diet DM, OM and NDF digestibility decreased linearly as dried distillers grains supplementation occurred less frequently. In Exp. 2, 48 crossbred steers were used in a two-year study to compare corn/soybean meal with dried distillers grains as winter supplements. Steers performed similarly when supplements were fed 6 days/week but performance was decreased when dried distillers ...


Economic Optimum Use Of Wet Distillers Grains In Feedlots, Kyle J. Vander Pol, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Darrell R. Mark Jan 2006

Economic Optimum Use Of Wet Distillers Grains In Feedlots, Kyle J. Vander Pol, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Darrell R. Mark

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

An economic analysis was conducted using feedlot performance, current feed ingredient prices, trucking, and cost of feeding inputs to determine economics of feeding wet distillers grains plus solubles (WDGS) at five dietary inclusions. The analysis also incorporated positive corn basis into the model. Cattle returns are greatest when incorporated WDGS is fed at 30 to 40% of DM at feedlots located between 0 and 60 miles from the plant. As distance of the feedlot increases from 60 to 100 miles from the plant, optimum inclusion is between 20 and 30% of dietary DM. Either a 5 or 10 cent positive ...


Frontmatter And Contents Jan 2006

Frontmatter And Contents

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Appreciation is expressed to the following firms, associations, or agencies who provided grant support for research in the beef cattle program.

Abengoa Bionergy Corp., York, Nebraska
Beef Board, Centennial, Colorado
Bioniche Lifes Services, Belleville, Ontario, Canada
Cargill Corn Milling, Blair, Nebraska
Elanco Animal Health, Indianapolis, Indiana
Intervet, Millsboro, Delaware
J.C. Robinson Seed Co., Waterloo, Nebraska
Montana State University, Boseman, Montana
Nebraska Cattlemen, Inc., Lincoln, Nebraska
Nebraska Corn Board, Lincoln, Nebraska
Nutrition Physiology Corp., Amarillo, Texas
Pfizer Inc., New York, New York
Soypass Royalty Funds, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska

Appreciation is also expressed to the following firms who ...


Effects Of Supplementing Beef Cows With Lipid From Whole Corn Germ, Jeremy Martin, Richard J. Rasby, Dennis R. Brink, Ron Lindquist, Duane Keisler, Stephen D. Kachman, Mark Dragastin Jan 2006

Effects Of Supplementing Beef Cows With Lipid From Whole Corn Germ, Jeremy Martin, Richard J. Rasby, Dennis R. Brink, Ron Lindquist, Duane Keisler, Stephen D. Kachman, Mark Dragastin

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

A two-year study was conducted with crossbred beef cows to determine whether supplementation with fat from whole corn germ either pre- or postpartum influenced ovarian activity before the breeding season, pregnancy rates, calving interval, calf performance, or serum leptin concentration. Supplements were fed for approximately 45 days before or 45 days after calving. Cows supplemented prepartum with fat from whole corn germ had shorter calving intervals. Ovarian activity before the breeding season, pregnancy rate, calf growth, and serum leptin were not different between groups.


Effects Of Supplementing Lactating, June-Calving Cows On Second-Calf Pregnancy Rates, Aaron Stalker, Kelly Creighton, Jacqueline A. Musgrave, Don C. Adams, Terry J. Klopfenstein Jan 2006

Effects Of Supplementing Lactating, June-Calving Cows On Second-Calf Pregnancy Rates, Aaron Stalker, Kelly Creighton, Jacqueline A. Musgrave, Don C. Adams, Terry J. Klopfenstein

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

A two year experiment evaluated the influence of supplementation pre-breeding on second-calf pregnancy rates in June-calving heifers. For 60 days before start of the breeding season, heifers were assigned to one of two treatments: supplementation of dried distillers grains (1.5 lb/day) to meet energy and metabolizable protein requirements or unsupplemented control. Supplementation improved body condition score during the supplementation period and resulted in increased body condition score at weaning. In year 1, feeding supplement to the dam did not change calf weight gain but feeding supplement increased calf weight in year 2. Pregnancy rates were 90% and not ...


Effects Of Pre- And Postpartum Nutrition On Reproduction In Spring Calving Cows And Calf Feedlot Performance, Leslie Aaron Stalker, Don C. Adams, Richard N. Funston, Terry J. Klopfenstein Jan 2006

Effects Of Pre- And Postpartum Nutrition On Reproduction In Spring Calving Cows And Calf Feedlot Performance, Leslie Aaron Stalker, Don C. Adams, Richard N. Funston, Terry J. Klopfenstein

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Crossbred, spring calving cows were used in a three-year experiment to evaluate the influence of supplemental protein prepartum and grazing sub-irrigated meadow postpartum on pregnancy rates and calf feedlot performance. Feeding supplement prepartum improved body condition score pre-calving and pre-breeding and increased the percentage of live calves at weaning but did not affect pregnancy rate or steer calf feedlot performance. Grazing sub-irrigated meadow did not change pregnancy rates or feedlot performance.


Effects Of Dam Nutrition On Growth And Reproductive Performance Of Heifer Calves, Jeremy Martin, Kim Vonnahme, Greg Lardy, Don C. Adams, Richard N. Funston Jan 2006

Effects Of Dam Nutrition On Growth And Reproductive Performance Of Heifer Calves, Jeremy Martin, Kim Vonnahme, Greg Lardy, Don C. Adams, Richard N. Funston

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

A 3-year experiment evaluated the effects of maternal nutrition on growth and reproductive performance of heifer calves. Supplementing cows with protein during late gestation resulted in heifers that were heavier at weaning and breeding, had higher pregnancy rates, and calved earlier. Allowing cows to graze meadows after calving improved calf weaning weight but not heifer reproductive performance. Heifers from cows that were fed hay after calving had reduced DMI and improved residual feed intake if their dams were supplemented with protein during gestation, but ADG and G:F were not affected by dam supplementation or spring feeding strategies.


Feeding Melengestrol Acetate To Bulls Prior To And At Puberty Alters Body Weight, And Hormone Concentration, April Tefler, Ryann Mcfee, Rebecca C. Bott, Joseph Schulz, Debra T. Clopton, Jeffrey W. Bergman, Karl V. Moline, Kathy Hanford, Andrea S. Cupp Jan 2006

Feeding Melengestrol Acetate To Bulls Prior To And At Puberty Alters Body Weight, And Hormone Concentration, April Tefler, Ryann Mcfee, Rebecca C. Bott, Joseph Schulz, Debra T. Clopton, Jeffrey W. Bergman, Karl V. Moline, Kathy Hanford, Andrea S. Cupp

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Melengestrol acetate (MGA), which is commonly used in the beef industry to manipulate ovarian activity of females, was fed to bulls at two times during development, prepubertal (5.5 to 7.5 months) and peri-pubertal (6.5 to 9.5 months), to determine effects on testes size, scrotal circumference, body weight, and/or hormone production. We can conclude that feeding bulls MGA during the prepubertal and peri-pubertal time can alter body weight and testosterone production.


Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Mrna Isoforms 120 And 164 Are Differentially Regulated Prior To Ovulation, Robin A. Ten Broeck, Debra T. Clopton, Jeremy L. Martin, Rebecca C. Bott, Karl V. Moline, Jeffrey W. Bergman, Andrea S. Cupp Jan 2006

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Mrna Isoforms 120 And 164 Are Differentially Regulated Prior To Ovulation, Robin A. Ten Broeck, Debra T. Clopton, Jeremy L. Martin, Rebecca C. Bott, Karl V. Moline, Jeffrey W. Bergman, Andrea S. Cupp

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is produced by cells surrounding the egg in the follicle prior to ovulation. If VEGF is inhibited, ovulation does not occur. The VEGF gene can be spliced to produce different protein isoforms which have specific functions. Our objective was to determine if VEGF 120 and 164 mRNA isoforms are differentially regulated in the preovulatory follicle. From our studies, VEGF isoforms are differentially regulated during both CL regression and after a simulated LH surge. Differences observed in VEGF isoform regulation may allow for manipulation of ovulation in the beef cow.


Digestibility Of Undegradable Intake Protein Of Feedstuffs, Joshua R. Benton, James C. Macdonald, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Don C. Adams Jan 2006

Digestibility Of Undegradable Intake Protein Of Feedstuffs, Joshua R. Benton, James C. Macdonald, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Don C. Adams

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Digestibility of undegradable intake protein of subirrigated meadows, upland native range, smooth bromegrass, and other feedstuffs used in several growing trials was measured using the mobile nylon bag technique. In general, as the grazing season progressed, undegradable intake protein (UIP) digestibility of grazed forages decreased. Also, UIP digestibility was highly variable among feedstuffs. Compared to the constant 80% digestibility of UIP used by the 1996 Beef NRC, grazed and harvested forages tend to have much lower UIP digestibility values while the supplemental protein sources evaluated tend to have higher UIP digestibility values.


Effect Of Fat And Undegradable Intake Protein In Dried Distillers Grains On Performance Of Cattle Grazing Smooth Bromegrass Pastures, James C. Macdonald, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein Jan 2006

Effect Of Fat And Undegradable Intake Protein In Dried Distillers Grains On Performance Of Cattle Grazing Smooth Bromegrass Pastures, James C. Macdonald, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Growing heifers grazing smooth bromegrass pastures were supplemented daily with dry distillers grains, corn bran + corn oil, or corn bran + corn gluten meal to determine the relative contributions of fat and undegradable intake protein in dried distillers grains to animal performance. For cattle supplemented from 0 to 0.75% body weight with dried distillers grains, ADG was improved by 0.14 lb for every 0.10% BW increase in dried distillers grains supplementation. Cattle supplemented with corn bran + corn gluten meal gained 38% as much as cattle supplemented with dry distillers grains while cattle supplemented with corn bran + corn oil ...


Effects Of Supplementing Dried Distillers Grains To Steers Grazing Summer Sandhill Range, Sarah Morris, James C. Macdonald, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Don C. Adams, Rex Davis, James R. Teichert Jan 2006

Effects Of Supplementing Dried Distillers Grains To Steers Grazing Summer Sandhill Range, Sarah Morris, James C. Macdonald, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Don C. Adams, Rex Davis, James R. Teichert

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Yearling steers continuously grazed summer native Sandhill range, with supplementation of varying levels of dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS): 0.26, 0.51, 0.77, and 1.03% BW. Forage intakes were predicted using an equation based on TDN. Forage intakes linearly decreased as level of DDGS increased. Average daily gain linearly increased as level of DDGS increased. Steers were finished and slaughtered. No significant differences were found in feedlot performance or carcass data. Economical analyses were conducted and suggest supplementing DDGS is profitable. Increased gain from supplementing yearling steers DDGS while grazing summer range did not affect feedlot ...


Dried Distillers Grains Supplementation Of Calves Grazing Corn Residue, Kristin H. Gustad, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Galen E. Erickson, Kyle J. Vander Pol, James C. Macdonald, Matthew A. Greenquist Jan 2006

Dried Distillers Grains Supplementation Of Calves Grazing Corn Residue, Kristin H. Gustad, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Galen E. Erickson, Kyle J. Vander Pol, James C. Macdonald, Matthew A. Greenquist

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Dried distillers grains (DDGS) were fed to weanling steer calves grazing nonirrigated corn residue to determine daily gain response and residue intake response to increasing levels of DDGS (from 1.5 to 6.5 lb/day in 1 lb increments). The DDGS was fed individually using Calan electronic gates. Daily gain increased from 0.9 (1.5 lb DDGS) to 1.8 (6.5 lb DDGS) lb/day . Forage intake decreased from 11.3 (1.5 lb DDGS) to 8.3 (6.5 lb DDGS) lb/day . Results provide information for selecting a DDGS supplementation level to achieve a target ...


Effect Of Corn Hybrid And Processing Method On Site And Extent Of Nutrient Digestibility Using The Mobile Bag Technique, Matt K. Luebbe, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Wayne Fithian Jan 2006

Effect Of Corn Hybrid And Processing Method On Site And Extent Of Nutrient Digestibility Using The Mobile Bag Technique, Matt K. Luebbe, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Wayne Fithian

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

The influence of corn hybrid and processing method onsite and extent of DM, starch, and protein digestibility was determined using the mobile bag technique. Samples consisted of three hybrids with known digestibility and feeding value processed as either dryrolled corn (DRC) or high-moisture corn (HMC). Ruminal and total tract nutrient digestibilities were greater for HMC compared to DRC. Differences among hybrids existed for all variables measured except ruminal starch digestibility and degradable intake protein. Undegradable intake protein (UIP) digestibility was greater for HMC compared to DRC (77.8 and 73.7%, respectively). However, UIP was lower for HMC than DRC ...


Influence Of Corn Hybrid And Processing Method On Digestibility And Ruminal Fermentation, Matt K. Luebbe, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Wayne Fithian Jan 2006

Influence Of Corn Hybrid And Processing Method On Digestibility And Ruminal Fermentation, Matt K. Luebbe, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Wayne Fithian

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Three hybrids with different kernel traits and feeding value were selected from a previous study to determine effects of corn hybrid and processing method (high-moisture corn (HMC), or dry-rolled corn DRC)) on nutrient digestibility and ruminal fermentation. DMI, intake rate, and total time spent eating were greater for HMC than DRC. Changes in ruminal pH and pH variance were also greater for HMC compared to DRC. Total-tract nutrient digestibility was influenced by processing method and hybrid. Nutrient digestibilities were greatest for hybrid 1, and greater for HMC compared to DRC. There was a hybrid by processing method interaction for molar ...


Influence Of Corn Hybrid On Kernel Traits, Flint W. Harrelson, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Lenis Alton Nelson, David S. Jackson Jan 2006

Influence Of Corn Hybrid On Kernel Traits, Flint W. Harrelson, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Lenis Alton Nelson, David S. Jackson

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Sixty commercially available corn hybrids were used to identify kernel traits that may be used as an indicator of feeding value to cattle. Three separate tests were conducted and 12 traits were evaluated for each hybrid. Most production traits were negatively correlated or not correlated to physical traits making them less indicative of cattle performance compared to some lab techniques. Based on the dry matter disappearance in the rumen, a harder kernel will be more efficiently digested. An approximately 10% change in dry matter disappearance is shown between the most and least digestible hybrid. Physical kernel traits can be helpful ...


Effect Of Corn Processing In Finishing Diets Containing Wet Distillers Grains On Feedlot Performance And Carcass Characteristics Of Finishing Steers, Kyle J. Vander Pol, Galen E. Erickson, Matthew A. Greenquist, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Thomas Robb Jan 2006

Effect Of Corn Processing In Finishing Diets Containing Wet Distillers Grains On Feedlot Performance And Carcass Characteristics Of Finishing Steers, Kyle J. Vander Pol, Galen E. Erickson, Matthew A. Greenquist, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Thomas Robb

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

An experiment evaluated the effects of six corn processing methods in feedlot diets containing 30% (DM basis) wet distillers grains plus solubles (WDGS). Treatments consisted of whole corn, dry-rolled corn, a dry-rolled/ high-moisture corn mix, high-moisture corn, steam flaked corn, and fine ground corn. The ADG was highest for steers receiving dry-rolled corn, high-moisture corn, or a 50:50 blend of dry-rolled and high-moisture corn. Feed conversion was best for steers receiving high-moisture corn. Interestingly, cattle fed finely ground corn or steam-flaked corn did not gain or convert as well as expected. Results indicate that there is a performance advantage ...


Effect Of Min-Ad Ruminal Buffer And Roughage Level On Ruminal Metabolism And Extent Of Digestion In Steers, Grant I. Crawford, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Galen E. Erickson, Clint Krehbiel, Greg Nunnery Jan 2006

Effect Of Min-Ad Ruminal Buffer And Roughage Level On Ruminal Metabolism And Extent Of Digestion In Steers, Grant I. Crawford, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Galen E. Erickson, Clint Krehbiel, Greg Nunnery

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Six ruminally and duodenally cannulated steers were used in a metabolism experiment to determine effects of adding a ruminal buffer to diets containing increasing levels of roughage. Steers were fed high-concentrate diets containing 4.5, 9.0, or 13.5% alfalfa hay with or without 1.0% MIN-AD ruminal buffer. There were no differences observed in feed intake, ruminal metabolism, or total tract digestibility due to MIN-AD inclusion in the diet. Average pH increased and time below pH 5.6 and pH 5.3 decreased with increasing alfalfa level. Total tract digestibility decreased with increasing alfalfa level. Addition of MIN-AD ...


Sodium Chloride And Soybeans In Feedlot Diets, Sheryl L. Colgan, Terry L. Mader Jan 2006

Sodium Chloride And Soybeans In Feedlot Diets, Sheryl L. Colgan, Terry L. Mader

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Two trials were conducted to evaluate feeding sodium chloride salt (NaCl) and soybeans to feedlot cattle in summer and winter seasons. The treatments were 1) control; 2) 1% added salt; 3) 5% added whole soybeans; and 4) the combination of 1% added salt and 5% added whole soybeans. Added salt had a tendency to decrease dry matter intake and increase water intake. Additional salt and soybeans elevated tympanic temperatures. Treatment did not have an effect on performance, carcass quality grade, or dressing percentage.


Effects Of Field Pea Level And Processing In Finishing Diets, Erin M. Fendrick, Ivan G. Rush, David D. Baltensperger, Dennis R. Brink, Galen E. Erickson Jan 2006

Effects Of Field Pea Level And Processing In Finishing Diets, Erin M. Fendrick, Ivan G. Rush, David D. Baltensperger, Dennis R. Brink, Galen E. Erickson

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Cattle were fed coarse rolled or whole field peas in a finishing diet to determine impact on finishing performance. The peas were included in the diet DM at 0%, 15%, and 30%. There were no significant differences in ADG, F:G, or carcass characteristics among processing methods or field pea level. DMI was significantly different due to level and not processing of peas. The DMI increased as the field peas inclusion increased to 30% the diet DM Field peas can be fed whole and replace corn in the diet up to 30%.


Large-Scale Clinical Trial To Evaluate An Experimental Escherichia Coli Vaccine, Robert E. Peterson, David R. Smith, Rodney A. Moxley, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Susan Hinkley, Galen E. Erickson Jan 2006

Large-Scale Clinical Trial To Evaluate An Experimental Escherichia Coli Vaccine, Robert E. Peterson, David R. Smith, Rodney A. Moxley, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Susan Hinkley, Galen E. Erickson

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

A clinical trial was conducted within 19 Nebraska feedlots to evaluate effects of an E. coli vaccine on the probability to detect E. coli O157:H7 on ROPES or for cattle to be colonized by E. coli O157:H7 at the terminal rectum. Vaccinated pens of cattle were less likely to test ROPE-positive than nonvaccinated pens of cattle and a lower probability for E. coli O157:H7 colonization among vaccinated cattle compared with nonvaccinated cattle was observed. The vaccine was effective at reducing E. coli O157:H7 in the feedlot pen environment and colonization at the terminal rectum of cattle.


Effect Of Optaflexx Dosage And Duration Of Feeding Prior To Slaughter On Feed Conversion And Carcass Characteristics, Grant I. Crawford, Galen E. Erickson, Kyle J. Vander Pol, Matthew A. Greenquist, Jeffrey Folmer, Mike Van Koevering Jan 2006

Effect Of Optaflexx Dosage And Duration Of Feeding Prior To Slaughter On Feed Conversion And Carcass Characteristics, Grant I. Crawford, Galen E. Erickson, Kyle J. Vander Pol, Matthew A. Greenquist, Jeffrey Folmer, Mike Van Koevering

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Finishing steer calves were fed 0, 100, or 200 mg/head/day of Optaflexx for the final 28, 35, or 42 days of the finishing period. Steers were started on Optaflexx treatment at one-week intervals and marketed as a single group. Feeding Optaflexx to feedlot steers increased ADG, improved F:G, and increased carcass weight. Feeding 200 mg/head/day of Optaflexx improved feed conversion by 8.1% without impacting carcass characteristics. Feeding Optaflexx at 200 mg/head/d for 28 to 42 days appears beneficial when compared with feeding diets without Optaflexx.


Effects Of Optaflexx Fed In Combination With Mga On Feedlot Heifer Performance, William A. Grififn, Galen E. Erickson, Bill Dicke, Robert J. Cooper, D. J. Jordon, William Moseley, Gary Sides, Jim S. Drouillard, Terry J. Klopfenstein Jan 2006

Effects Of Optaflexx Fed In Combination With Mga On Feedlot Heifer Performance, William A. Grififn, Galen E. Erickson, Bill Dicke, Robert J. Cooper, D. J. Jordon, William Moseley, Gary Sides, Jim S. Drouillard, Terry J. Klopfenstein

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

A commercial feedlot experiment was conducted using 1,807 heifers to evaluate the effects of Optaflexx fed in combination with MGA on finishing heifer performance. In heifers receiving MGA throughout the entire 126-143 day feeding period, feeding Optaflexx for the last 31-38 days increased ADG and hot carcass weight compared to heifers fed MGA but not Optaflexx. Heifers fed MGA and Optaflexx had increased DMI, improved feed efficiency and increased final live weight. Carcass quality measurements were not influenced by treatment.


Growth Promoting Agents And Season Effects On Blood Metabolite And Body Temperature Measures, Terry L. Mader, Wanda Kreikemeier Jan 2006

Growth Promoting Agents And Season Effects On Blood Metabolite And Body Temperature Measures, Terry L. Mader, Wanda Kreikemeier

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

To assess growth promoting agents efficacy among seasons, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, blood metabolites, and tympanic temperature were measured in summer and winter studies. Within each season, pens of heifers were assigned to one of six growth promotant treatments. Season by growth promotant treatment interactions (P < 0.05) indicated that the combination of estrogen and trenbolone acetate increased triiodothyronine in the winter, whereas trenbolone acetate alone decreased both triiodothyronine and thyroxine in the winter. Maximum tympanic temperature was greater (P < 0.01) in the summer than in the winter, while minimum tympanic temperature was lowered (P < 0.01) in the summer. Changes in blood metabolite levels resulting from the use of growth promotants do not appear to substantially influence seasonal changes in body temperature.


Inhibition Of Methanogenesis In Rumen Fluid Cultures, Eric Behlke, Razvan Dumitru, Stephen Ragsdale, James M. Takacs, Jess L. Miner Jan 2006

Inhibition Of Methanogenesis In Rumen Fluid Cultures, Eric Behlke, Razvan Dumitru, Stephen Ragsdale, James M. Takacs, Jess L. Miner

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

We identified 32 compounds that inhibit 13 to 100% of the methane produced by in vitro cultures of rumen fluid and have the potential to inhibit enteric methanogenesis in ruminant animals. The compounds are analogous to a substrate in the methane biosynthesis pathway, and may inhibit methane production yet not affect other organisms in the rumen.