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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Dispersal Of Newly Eclosed European Corn Borer Adults (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) From Corn Into Small-Grain Aggregation Plots, Brendon James Reardon, Douglas V. Sumerford, Thomas W. Sappington Oct 2006

Dispersal Of Newly Eclosed European Corn Borer Adults (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) From Corn Into Small-Grain Aggregation Plots, Brendon James Reardon, Douglas V. Sumerford, Thomas W. Sappington

Entomology Publications

Genetically modified, insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) corn, Zea mays L., hybrids are used throughout the Corn Belt for European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), control. To slow development of Bt corn resistance, the Environmental Protection Agency requires growers to plant a refuge. Determining the appropriate distance between a refuge and Bt corn, and development of mitigation–remediation strategies such as mass releases of susceptible moths, requires an understanding of adult dispersal and mating behavior. However, much remains unknown about these behaviors. Because mating often occurs in grass near cornfields where adult O. nubilalis aggregate, we planted small-grain plots ...


Using Genetic Markers And Population Assignment Techniques To Infer Origin Of Boll Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Unexpectedly Captured Near An Eradication Zone In Mexico, Kyung Seok Kim, Pedro Cano-Rios, Thomas W. Sappington Aug 2006

Using Genetic Markers And Population Assignment Techniques To Infer Origin Of Boll Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Unexpectedly Captured Near An Eradication Zone In Mexico, Kyung Seok Kim, Pedro Cano-Rios, Thomas W. Sappington

Entomology Publications

Several boll weevils, Anthonomus grandis Boheman, were captured in pheromone traps in 2004 near Tlahualilo, Durango, Mexico, an area where none had been reported for ≈10 yr. It is possible that they were from an endemic population normally too low in numbers to be detected but that increased in response to more favorable rainfall conditions in 2004. Alternatively, they may represent an influx of migrants or the immediate descendents of migrants. To identify the most likely origin of the boll weevils captured in this area, we characterized microsatellite variation of the Tlahualilo weevils and compared it with the variation from ...


Molecular Genetic Variation Of Boll Weevil Populations In North America Estimated With Microsatellites: Implications For Patterns Of Dispersal, Kyung Seok Kim, Thomas W. Sappington May 2006

Molecular Genetic Variation Of Boll Weevil Populations In North America Estimated With Microsatellites: Implications For Patterns Of Dispersal, Kyung Seok Kim, Thomas W. Sappington

Entomology Publications

The boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis Boheman) is an insect pest of cotton that underwent a well-documented range expansion across the southeastern U.S. from Mexico beginning about 110 years ago. Eleven microsatellite loci were surveyed to infer the magnitude and pattern of genetic differentiation among boll weevil populations from 18 locations across eight U.S. states and northeast Mexico. Estimates of genetic diversity (allelic diversity and heterozygosity) were greater in Southern than Northern populations, and were greater in the west than the east among Northern populations. Boll weevil populations were genetically structured as a whole across the geographic range sampled ...


Dispersal Of Boll Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) From Cotton Modules Before Ginning, Thomas W. Sappington, Mark D. Arnold, Alan D. Brashears, Megha N. Parajulee, Stanley C. Carroll, Allen E. Knutson, John W. Norman Jr. Feb 2006

Dispersal Of Boll Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) From Cotton Modules Before Ginning, Thomas W. Sappington, Mark D. Arnold, Alan D. Brashears, Megha N. Parajulee, Stanley C. Carroll, Allen E. Knutson, John W. Norman Jr.

Entomology Publications

We characterized the level of risk of boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman, reintroduction to an eradication zone posed by dispersal from cotton modules during and after transport to the gin. Mark–release-recapture experiments in August and September in Texas indicated that most weevils disperse rapidly from the module surface, temperature permitting, unless confined under a module tarp, where most died. Nevertheless, 1–5% of released weevils were recovered alive after 24 h on the side and top surfaces of modules, representing potential dispersants. Mortality of boll weevils caged on the top surface of a module was 95–100% after ...


Linking Direct And Indirect Data On Dispersal: Isolation By Slope In A Headwater Stream Salamander, Winsor H. Lowe, Gene E. Likens, Mark A. Mcpeek, Don C. Buso Feb 2006

Linking Direct And Indirect Data On Dispersal: Isolation By Slope In A Headwater Stream Salamander, Winsor H. Lowe, Gene E. Likens, Mark A. Mcpeek, Don C. Buso

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

There is growing recognition of the need to incorporate information on movement behavior in landscape-scale studies of dispersal. One way to do this is by using indirect indices of dispersal (e.g., genetic differentiation) to test predictions derived from direct data on movement behavior. Mark–recapture studies documented upstream-biased movement in the salamander Gyrinophilus porphyriticus (Plethodontidae). Based on this information, we hypothesized that gene flow in G. porphyriticus is affected by the slope of the stream. Specifically, because the energy required for upstream dispersal is positively related to slope, we predicted gene flow to be negatively related to change in ...