Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2004

PDF

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Articles 1 - 30 of 33

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Nebraska 2004 Beef Cattle Report (Complete Volume) Jan 2004

Nebraska 2004 Beef Cattle Report (Complete Volume)

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Contents

Cow-Calf
An Evaluation of Economic Efficiencies of Two Beef Systems from Calving to Harvest
A System for Wintering Spring-calving Bred Heifers Without Feeding Hay
Effect of Gestation and Supplementation on Intake of Low-quality Forage

Grazing
A Review of Corn Stalk Grazing on Animal Performance and Crop Yield
Feed Values for Annual Forages in Western Nebraska
Urea Inclusion in Forage Based Diets Containing Dried Distillers Grains
Effect of Distillers Grains or Corn Supplementation Frequency on Forage Intake and Digestibility
Dried Distillers Grains as a Grazed Forage Supplement

Finishing
Effects of Corn Bran and Degradable Protein Source on Microbial Protein Estimated ...


Phosphorus Requirement For Finishing Heifers, Bobbi Gene Geisert, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Casey N. Macken Jan 2004

Phosphorus Requirement For Finishing Heifers, Bobbi Gene Geisert, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Casey N. Macken

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Sixty head of crossbred heifers (614 lb initial BW) were individually fed one of five levels of phosphorus of 0.10, 0.17, 0.24, 0.31, 0.38 % of diet DM with supplemental P from monosodium phosphate. Heifers were fed an energy-dense diet composed primarily of corn starch and corn fiber to minimize P from corn. When compared to the other four levels, heifers fed at the 0.10 % P level had lower DMI, ADG and final BW. Heifers fed 0.10%P had lower plasma P concentration. Breakpoint analysis of ADG suggests that the P requirement for finishing ...


Sodium Chloride Levels For Finishing Feedlot Heifers, Casey B. Wilson, Galen E. Erickson, Casey N. Macken, Terry J. Klopfenstein Jan 2004

Sodium Chloride Levels For Finishing Feedlot Heifers, Casey B. Wilson, Galen E. Erickson, Casey N. Macken, Terry J. Klopfenstein

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

A trial was conducted to establish a NaCl level that maximizes intake and performance while minimizing excretion of Na to the environment. Fifty-nine individually fed yearling heifers (803 lb) were fed 113 days. NaCl was added to a corn-based feedlot diet at levels of 0, 0.125, 0.25, 0.375 and 0.5 % of diet DM. No difference in ADG, DMI or F/G were observed with different levels of NaCl. Results suggest NaCl inclusion in the diet likely is not necessary to maintain acceptable feedlot performance.


Basis Variability On The Feeder Cattle Contract Versus The Failed Stocker Contract, Dillon Feuz, Sebastian Perversi, Wendy Umberger Jan 2004

Basis Variability On The Feeder Cattle Contract Versus The Failed Stocker Contract, Dillon Feuz, Sebastian Perversi, Wendy Umberger

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Basis variability was compared in 10 markets for 550 and 750 pound steers using the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) stocker and feeder indexes as a proxy for futures prices. Basis variability for 550 pound steers was significantly greater than basis variability for 750 pound steers. As market volume decreased and as volume variability increased, basis variability also increased. The failed CME stocker contract never attracted enough volume to remain a viable contract. One possible explanation for this contract failure is the basis risk associated with it was large enough to discourage producers from using the contract to hedge calves.


Prediction Of Net Energy Adjuster For Feedlot Cattle When Using The 1996 Beef Cattle Nrc Model, Casey N. Macken, Rob J. Cooper, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Galen E. Erickson Jan 2004

Prediction Of Net Energy Adjuster For Feedlot Cattle When Using The 1996 Beef Cattle Nrc Model, Casey N. Macken, Rob J. Cooper, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Galen E. Erickson

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Data from 277 treatment means in 15 previous beef cattle studies were used to develop equations to predict net energy adjusters throughout the feeding period to better predict gain with the National Research Council’s 1996 Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle model. Early in the feeding period the net energy adjuster reduces the energy to correct for overprediction of gain and late in the feeding period the net energy adjuster increases energy to correct for under prediction of gain. The average NE adjusters were 0.88 and 1.08 for the beginning and end of the feeding period.


An Evaluation Of Economic Efficiencies Of Two Beef Systems From Calving To Harvest, Rosemary V. Anderson, Richard J. Rasby, Dick Clark, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Casey Macken Jan 2004

An Evaluation Of Economic Efficiencies Of Two Beef Systems From Calving To Harvest, Rosemary V. Anderson, Richard J. Rasby, Dick Clark, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Casey Macken

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Spring-calving, crossbred cows were used in a three-year experiment to determine the economic efficiencies of two different beef systems. Cows were either wintered on pasture (Control System) or on cornstalks (Treatment System). Control System steers were transported to a feedlot, fed a finishing diet and slaughtered. Treatment System steers were wintered on cornstalks, grazed pasture, fed a finishing diet and slaughtered. The Treatment System had lower weaning and slaughter breakeven, lower cost per weaned calf and greater profit potential when finished steers were sold on a live basis. Profitability was similar when finished steers were sold on a grid basis.


Cow Muscle Profiling: A Comparison Of Chemical And Physical Properties Of 21 Muscles From Beef And Dairy Cow Carcasses, Mike L. Buford, Chris R. Calkins, D. Dwain Johnson, Bucky L. Gwartney Jan 2004

Cow Muscle Profiling: A Comparison Of Chemical And Physical Properties Of 21 Muscles From Beef And Dairy Cow Carcasses, Mike L. Buford, Chris R. Calkins, D. Dwain Johnson, Bucky L. Gwartney

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

About 43% of the meat from cow carcasses is sold into the boxed beef trade. This research was conducted to compare muscles from beef and dairy cows in an effort to identify optimal uses for cow muscles. Twenty-one muscles from beef and dairy cow carcasses were analyzed for objective color, total heme-iron, total collagen, pH, expressible moisture and proximate composition. Wide variation was observed for all properties measured. Effects of breed type on all measured traits were minimal except in the case of percent moisture. These results indicate muscles from beef and dairy cows are similar in chemical and physical ...


Evaluation Of Initial Implants For Finishing Heifers, Travis B. Farran, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Gary Sides, Chris Reinhardt, Bill Dicke, Jim S. Drouillard Jan 2004

Evaluation Of Initial Implants For Finishing Heifers, Travis B. Farran, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Gary Sides, Chris Reinhardt, Bill Dicke, Jim S. Drouillard

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

A commercial feedyard experiment evaluated initial implant strategies for feedlot heifers. Heifers were administered either Revalor-IH or Synovex-H at initial processing, with both treatment groups receiving Revalor-200 as a common terminal implant. Implanting heifers initially with Revalor-IH improved feed efficiency and ADG compared to heifers implanted initially with Synovex-H. In addition, Revalor- IH implanted heifers had higher marbling scores while 58% more carcasses achieved the upper two-thirds Choice category. There were no differences in USDA yield grades. Selling Revalor- IH implanted heifers on a carcass merit basis returned $14.22/head more than Synovex-H implanted heifers. New reduced-dose initial implants ...


Vaccination And Direct Fed Microbials As Intervention Strategies For Reduction Of E. Coli O157:H7 In Feedlot Steers, Jeffrey D. Folmer, Casey N. Macken, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Rodney A. Moxley, David R. Smith, Susanne Hinkley, Andrew A. Potter, B. Brett Finley Jan 2004

Vaccination And Direct Fed Microbials As Intervention Strategies For Reduction Of E. Coli O157:H7 In Feedlot Steers, Jeffrey D. Folmer, Casey N. Macken, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Rodney A. Moxley, David R. Smith, Susanne Hinkley, Andrew A. Potter, B. Brett Finley

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

A clinical trial was conducted to evaluate effects of two intervention strategies on the prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 shedding by feedlot steers using 384 steers and 48 pens. Intervention strategies were a direct fed microbial or vaccination against E. coli O157:H7. No differences in performance or carcass yield were observed for direct fed microbial or vaccination treatments, compared to the control. Vaccination significantly reduced the prevalence of E. coli O157:H7. In addition, we also observed a non-significant decrease in the prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 with inclusion of the direct fed microbial.


Delayed Implanting Improves Quality Grade In Steer Calves, Richard N. Funston, Don C. Adams, Rex Davis, James R. Teichert Jan 2004

Delayed Implanting Improves Quality Grade In Steer Calves, Richard N. Funston, Don C. Adams, Rex Davis, James R. Teichert

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

One hundred steer calves were used to evaluate the effect of delaying initial implanting on feedlot and carcass characteristics. One-half the steers were implanted with Synovex S® after a 14 day acclimation period, the remainder were implanted 30 days after the 14 day acclimation period. All calves were re-implanted 112 days after the beginning of the study with Synovex Choice® and harvested 100 days later. Neither final weight (1269 lb) nor ADG (3.74 lb/day) were affected by implant regimen. Delayed implant steers had a higher percentage grading Choice (92 vs 68%). Delaying implanting resulted in a 24% increase ...


The Influence Of Corn Kernel Traits On Feedlot Cattle Performance, Stephanie L. Jaeger, Casey N. Macken, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Wayne A. Fithian, David S. Jackson Jan 2004

The Influence Of Corn Kernel Traits On Feedlot Cattle Performance, Stephanie L. Jaeger, Casey N. Macken, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Wayne A. Fithian, David S. Jackson

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Seven commercially available corn hybrids representing a range within and among kernel traits were used in a finishing trial to evaluate effects of corn kernel traits on feedlot animal performance. Average daily gain, DMI, and hot carcass weight were similar among all corn hybrids. A significant difference in feed conversion of 8.4% from lowest to highest among hybrids was observed. Kernel traits correlated with feed conversion were 1,000 grain weight, stenvert time to grind, and stenvert proportion of soft to coarse particles. Efficiency of finishing cattle gain can be significantly improved by selection of corn hybrids with more ...


Effect Of Distillers Grains Or Corn Supplementation Frequency On Forage Intake And Digestibility, Tim W. Loy, James C. Macdonald, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Galen E. Erickson Jan 2004

Effect Of Distillers Grains Or Corn Supplementation Frequency On Forage Intake And Digestibility, Tim W. Loy, James C. Macdonald, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Galen E. Erickson

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Ten ruminally cannulated heifers received no supplement, dry distillers grains (DDG) daily, DDG on alternating days, dry rolled corn daily, or corn on alternating days. Hay intake was higher for non-supplemented than for supplemented heifers. No intake differences were observed between DDG and corn-supplemented heifers. Heifers supplemented daily had higher and more consistent intakes than those in alternate-day treatments, particularly within corn-supplemented heifers. Ruminal pH and hay fiber disappearance were greater in non-supplemented heifers. Corn-supplemented heifers had slower rates of fiber disappearance than DDG-supplemented. Alternate-day energy supplementation increased intake variability compared to daily supplementation.


A System For Wintering Spring-Calving Bred Heifers Without Feeding Hay, Tim W. Loy, Don C. Adams, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Dillon Feuz, Jacqueline A. Musgrave, Burke Teichert Jan 2004

A System For Wintering Spring-Calving Bred Heifers Without Feeding Hay, Tim W. Loy, Don C. Adams, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Dillon Feuz, Jacqueline A. Musgrave, Burke Teichert

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Two systems for wintering pregnant, March-calving heifers were compared over two years on a commercial Nebraska ranch. The ranch’s standard management system (CON) included grazed forage, supplement and hay. The alternative system (TRT) relied on grazed forage and higher levels of supplement, with no hay. Treatment effects on weight and body condition changes differed between years. Calves nursing TRT heifers tended to gain more weight. Two-year-old pregnancy rates did not differ. Partial budget analysis suggests the TRT system reduced expense by $7 per heifer, while maintaining a high level of performance.


Effects Of Corn Bran And Degradable Protein Source On Microbial Protein Estimated From Spot Urine Samples In Heifers, R. Allen Mcdonald, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Galen E. Erickson, Tim W. Loy, Kimberly M. Whittet Jan 2004

Effects Of Corn Bran And Degradable Protein Source On Microbial Protein Estimated From Spot Urine Samples In Heifers, R. Allen Mcdonald, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Galen E. Erickson, Tim W. Loy, Kimberly M. Whittet

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

A metabolism trial was conducted in finishing heifers to determine if allantoin in spot urine samples could be a predictor of microbial CP (MCP) supply. When corn bran replaced high moisture corn, ruminal pH was higher and microbial efficiency and flow were greater. Estimated microbial efficiency and flow were not different for SBM compared to urea as a source of degradable protein. Daily variation in intake was reflected in MCP estimates. Within day variation for MCP estimates was consistent and small. Estimates of MCP from allantoin in spot urine samples followed NRC estimates. Results demonstrate that allantoin is an effective ...


Effects Of Corn Bran And Degradable Protein Source On Finishing Heifer Performance And Estimates Of Microbial Protein Supply In High Moisture Corn Finishing Diets, R. Allen Macdonald, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Galen E. Erickson, Casey N. Macken, Kimberly M. Whittet Jan 2004

Effects Of Corn Bran And Degradable Protein Source On Finishing Heifer Performance And Estimates Of Microbial Protein Supply In High Moisture Corn Finishing Diets, R. Allen Macdonald, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Galen E. Erickson, Casey N. Macken, Kimberly M. Whittet

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

A feeding trial was conducted to evaluate performance and estimates of microbial CP (MCP) supply in high moisture corn finishing diets with corn bran addition and different sources of degradable protein. Corn bran increased intake throughout the feeding period but decreased performance after day 42. Microbial efficiency and MCP were unaffected by corn bran addition, but MCP increased with increasing urea level. Performance was increased for the first 42 days when SBM was fed relative to urea, but microbial efficiency and MCP were unaffected. Supplemental DIP level did not affect MCP estimates. Estimates of MCP from allantoin were low and ...


Dried Distillers Grains As A Grazed Forage Supplement, James C. Macdonald, Terry J. Klopfenstein Jan 2004

Dried Distillers Grains As A Grazed Forage Supplement, James C. Macdonald, Terry J. Klopfenstein

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Thirty heifers grazing smooth bromegrass were individually supplemented with 0, 1.0, 2.1, 3.1, or 4.2 lb per head per day (DM) dried distillers grains (DDG) for 84 days to determine effects of DDG supplementation on ADG and forage intake and to determine the value of DDG in grazing enterprises. Forage intake was estimated using the 1996 NRC model. Supplementation of DDG resulted in a linear increase in ADG and decreased estimated forage intake. DDG may be an attractive forage supplement due to increased revenue from additional ADG and savings from decreased forage intake.


Consumer Acceptance And Value Of Beef From Various Countries Of Origin, Bethany M. Sitz, Chris R. Calkins, Wendy J. Umberger, Dillon M. Feuz Jan 2004

Consumer Acceptance And Value Of Beef From Various Countries Of Origin, Bethany M. Sitz, Chris R. Calkins, Wendy J. Umberger, Dillon M. Feuz

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

To determine consumer acceptance and value of beef from various countries, 12 taste panels were conducted in each of two cities. Two pairs of beef strip steaks were evaluated - domestic versus Australian grass-fed and domestic versus Canadian. Consumers gave significantly higher scores for flavor, tenderness and overall acceptability to domestic steaks compared to Australian grass-fed steaks and Canadian steaks. A significantly higher value also was placed on the domestic samples compared to Australian grass-fed steaks ($3.68/lb versus $2.48/lb) and Canadian steaks ($3.95/lb versus $3.57/lb). U.S. consumers preferred and were willing to ...


Consumer Acceptance And Value Of Wet Aged And Dry Aged Beef Steaks, Bethany M. Sitz, Chris R. Calkins, Wendy J. Umberger, Dillon M. Feuz Jan 2004

Consumer Acceptance And Value Of Wet Aged And Dry Aged Beef Steaks, Bethany M. Sitz, Chris R. Calkins, Wendy J. Umberger, Dillon M. Feuz

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Beef aged in air (dry aging) develops a different flavor profile than beef aged in vacuum bags (wet aging). This research compared wet versus dry aged beef. At similar tenderness and marbling, no differences in desirability or value were found for wet versus dry aged Choice beef. For Prime, wet aged steaks were rated more desirable in flavor, juiciness, and overall acceptability and valued more than dry aged Prime. A significant proportion (27- 30%) of consumers preferred dry aged beef and were willing to pay > $1.90/ lb more for it. Consumers can detect sensory differences in beef and are ...


Consumer Preference And Value Of Beef With Country-Of-Origin Labeling, Bethany M. Sitz, Chris R. Calkins, Wendy J. Umberger, Dillon M. Feuz Jan 2004

Consumer Preference And Value Of Beef With Country-Of-Origin Labeling, Bethany M. Sitz, Chris R. Calkins, Wendy J. Umberger, Dillon M. Feuz

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

The 2002 Farm Bill mandates country- of-origin labeling for beef and other items by 2004. A majority (69.2%) of consumers in Denver and Chicago preferred a fresh beef strip steak with a label guaranteeing the meat came from a U.S. animal over an unlabeled steak. On average, consumers were willing to pay 18.7% more ($0.81/lb) for labeled product. When 17 attributes were rated for their desirability when purchasing beef, country-of- origin labeling ranked ninth; “freshness” and “inspected for food safety” were the most popular selection criteria. Food safety concerns were the primary reason consumers preferred ...


Urea Inclusion In Forage Based Diets Containing Dried Distillers Grains, Leslie Aaron Stalker, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Don C. Adams, Galen E. Erickson Jan 2004

Urea Inclusion In Forage Based Diets Containing Dried Distillers Grains, Leslie Aaron Stalker, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Don C. Adams, Galen E. Erickson

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Two experiments evaluated supplemental degradable intake protein requirements when dried distillers grains were fed as an energy source in forage-based diets. Diets were formulated to be greater than 100 g/day deficient in degradable intake protein but with excess metabolizable protein. In both experiments, no response in performance was observed when urea was added to the diet. Sufficient urea was probably recycled to correct the degradable intake protein deficiency. These studies indicate adding urea to meet the degradable intake protein requirement is not necessary when dried distillers grains are fed as an energy source in forage-based diets.


Effect Of Wet And Dry Distillers Grains Plus Solubles And Supplemental Fat Level On Performance Of Yearling Finishing Cattle, Kyle J. Vander Pol, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Casey N. Macken Jan 2004

Effect Of Wet And Dry Distillers Grains Plus Solubles And Supplemental Fat Level On Performance Of Yearling Finishing Cattle, Kyle J. Vander Pol, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Casey N. Macken

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Two finishing trials were conducted to compare the addition of fat from either wet or dry distillers byproducts (WDGS; DDGS) to that provided from one of two commercially available fat sources (corn oil, Trial 1; tallow, Trial 2). In Trial 1, feed conversion and ADG decreased linearly as level of corn oil increased, while feed conversion and ADG were improved numerically as the level of WDGS increased in the diet. In Trial 2, no differences in performance were observed comparing cattle fed dry distillers grains plus solubles to cattle fed diets containing tallow. WDGS provided 12 and 17% more net ...


Feed Values For Annual Forages In Western Nebraska, Burton A. Weichenthal, David D. Baltensperger, Kenneth P. Vogel Jan 2004

Feed Values For Annual Forages In Western Nebraska, Burton A. Weichenthal, David D. Baltensperger, Kenneth P. Vogel

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Forage quality testing was completed on annual forages grown during 1998 and/or 1999. Included were spring cereals, legumes and summer annuals like sorghum and millets. Using a single cut harvest system when the majority of summer annuals had produced seed heads, crude protein (CP) was generally more than 8% and total digestible nutrients (TDN) more than 63% of dry matter. Annual legumes had 12 to 18% CP and more than 63% TDN. Pearl and irrigated foxtail millets had higher crude protein levels than sorghum forages, but nitrate levels were also higher. Some mineral contents varied by location and associated ...


Effect Of Age, Pregnancy, And Diet On Urinary Creatinine Excretion In Heifers And Cows, Kimberly M. Whittet, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Galen E. Erickson, Tim W. Loy, R. Allen Mcdonald Jan 2004

Effect Of Age, Pregnancy, And Diet On Urinary Creatinine Excretion In Heifers And Cows, Kimberly M. Whittet, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Galen E. Erickson, Tim W. Loy, R. Allen Mcdonald

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

A series of total urine collections was conducted to evaluate effect of age, pregnancy and diet on creatinine excretion in heifers and cows. To test effect of age on creatinine excretion, 31 animals ranging from 5 to 104 months of age were fed a hay diet supplemented with dried distillers grains (DDG). There was no difference in creatinine excretion across age. Cows fed the same diet were sampled to determine effect of pregnancy on creatinine excretion. Pregnancy did not affect daily creatinine excretion. Two collection periods were conducted to determine if diet alters creatinine excretion. In period 1, heifers were ...


Impact Of Cleaning Frequency On Nitrogen Balance In Open Feedlot Pens, Casey B. Wilson, Galen E. Erickson, Casey N. Macken, Terry J. Klopfenstein Jan 2004

Impact Of Cleaning Frequency On Nitrogen Balance In Open Feedlot Pens, Casey B. Wilson, Galen E. Erickson, Casey N. Macken, Terry J. Klopfenstein

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Pen cleaning frequency of feedlot pens was evaluated during the summer of 2001 and 2002. Dry matter, organic matter and nitrogen recoveries were evaluated on a per head basis. Cleaning pens monthly compared to cleaning at the end of the feeding period resulted in significantly more DM, OM and N recovered. Cleaning pens every month increased N removal by 7.0 lb per steer (49.9% increase) above manure N removed at the end of the feeding period.


A Review Of Corn Stalk Grazing On Animal Performance And Crop Yield, Casey B. Wilson, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Richard J. Rasby, Don C. Adams, Ivan G. Rush Jan 2004

A Review Of Corn Stalk Grazing On Animal Performance And Crop Yield, Casey B. Wilson, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Richard J. Rasby, Don C. Adams, Ivan G. Rush

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

The highest cost to beef cow-calf and backgrounding operations is the feeding of stored feeds in winter months. Nebraska has an abundance of corn fields available for grazing following harvest. Utilization of corn crop residue is quite effective in reducing feed costs. There are a number of important considerations associated with residue utilization. Stocking rates, diet quality, genetically modified corn, subsequent crop yields and supplementation are discussed.


Carcass Traits And Palatability Attributes Of Herdmates Finished As Calves Or Yearling Steers, Perry S. Brewer, Chris R. Calkins, Richard J. Rasby, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Rosemary V. Anderson Jan 2004

Carcass Traits And Palatability Attributes Of Herdmates Finished As Calves Or Yearling Steers, Perry S. Brewer, Chris R. Calkins, Richard J. Rasby, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Rosemary V. Anderson

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

A two-year study compared steers from the same herd finished as calves or yearlings at a fat thickness endpoint of 0.5 in. Yearlings yielded heavier carcasses with larger ribeye areas, lower marbling scores and lower quality grades. Calves produced more tender steaks measured by shear force and a consumer taste panel. The probability of a tough steak (based on shear force) from calf-fed steers was 1.9 and 0.02% for 7 and 21 days of aging, respectively, while the risk for yearlings was 29.2 and 4.0%, respectively. Calf-fed steers produced more tender steaks and, after 21 ...


Wet Corn Gluten Feed And Alfalfa Hay Levels In Dry-Rolled Corn Finishing Diets, Travis B. Farran, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Casey N. Macken, Ronald U. Lindquist Jan 2004

Wet Corn Gluten Feed And Alfalfa Hay Levels In Dry-Rolled Corn Finishing Diets, Travis B. Farran, Galen E. Erickson, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Casey N. Macken, Ronald U. Lindquist

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

One hundred ninety-two yearling steers were fed 132 days (June to October) to determine if roughage levels could be reduced in dry-rolled corn finishing diets containing wet corn gluten feed (WCGF) and to evaluate the effects on N volatilization. Finishing diets contained either 0 or 35% WCGF and 0, 3.75, or 7.5% alfalfa hay. Intake, ADG, and carcass weight increased as level of alfalfa hay increased, or when WCGF was fed. Feed conversions of cattle fed 35% WCGF were improved 4.4% compared to conversions of cattle fed no WCGF at 0% alfalfa hay. Within 35% WCGF diets ...


Crop Performance And Soil Properties Of Sites Previously Used For Production Of Beef Cattle Manure Compost, Daniel Ginting, Bahman Eghball, Daniel T. Walters, Charles Francis, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Casey Wilson, Galen E. Erickson Jan 2004

Crop Performance And Soil Properties Of Sites Previously Used For Production Of Beef Cattle Manure Compost, Daniel Ginting, Bahman Eghball, Daniel T. Walters, Charles Francis, Terry J. Klopfenstein, Casey Wilson, Galen E. Erickson

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

This study was established on sites that had three or seven years of compost production history. Corn, wheat, barley, sorghum and alfalfa were planted in 2001. In the first year, wheat, barley and sorghum performed better than corn in the windrow areas while alfalfa did not even establish because of excessive salt in the soil. Soil electrical conductivity, K and Na in the 0-6 inch depth under windrows were high and caused soil crusting and poor germination and crop yields. Growing salt tolerant crops, such as barley, can rehabilitate sites used for composting and the process can be accelerated by ...


Conjugated Linoleic Acid Metabolism And Body Fat Loss In Mice, Kim Hargrave, Brett Meyer, Jess L. Miner Jan 2004

Conjugated Linoleic Acid Metabolism And Body Fat Loss In Mice, Kim Hargrave, Brett Meyer, Jess L. Miner

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Mice were fed conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) with or without fish oil or aspirin, which deplete tissue arachidonic acid and block arachidonic acid metabolism, respectively. Mice fed fish oil did not lose body fat when supplemented with CLA but mice fed soy oil did. Aspirin did not alter CLA-induced body fat loss. CLA may be metabolized to an isomer of arachidonic acid to induce a loss of body fat. However, this body fat loss is apparently not mediated via alteration of prostaglandin synthesis. Understanding the regulation of body fat by CLA may offer insight into the mechanisms of body fat ...


Effect Of Conjugated Linoleic Acid On Cell Death In Adipose Tissue, Kim M. Hargrave, Brett J. Meyer, Jess L. Miner Jan 2004

Effect Of Conjugated Linoleic Acid On Cell Death In Adipose Tissue, Kim M. Hargrave, Brett J. Meyer, Jess L. Miner

Nebraska Beef Cattle Reports

Mice fed conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) lose body fat. This loss of body fat is accompanied by an increases in DNA fragmentation, indicative of apoptosis or programmed cell death. Adipose apoptosis was observed in mice fed the trans-10, cis-12 isomer or a mixture of isomers but not the cis-9,trans-11 isomer. The trans-10,cis-12 isomer also induced DNA fragmentation in preadipocytes in vitro, but not mature adipocytes. The cis-9,trans-11 CLA isomer, the predominant isomer in ruminant-derived products, was reported to induce apoptosis of cancer cells. Determining the mechanism of action of CLA will improve our understanding of body fat ...