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Knowing The Risk Of Soybean Rust By Comparison With Brazil, X. B. Yang, Emerson M. Del Ponte, Ana Paula Dias Dec 2004

Knowing The Risk Of Soybean Rust By Comparison With Brazil, X. B. Yang, Emerson M. Del Ponte, Ana Paula Dias

Integrated Crop Management News

One of the common questions we receive is whether to move away from soybean because of the risk of soybean rust (SBR). Although studies indicate that the U.S. soybean production region is suitable to this disease, many experts believe outbreaks of the disease are likely to be sporadic.


Isu Introduces The Corn And Soybean Initiative, Brian Gene Meyer Dec 2004

Isu Introduces The Corn And Soybean Initiative, Brian Gene Meyer

Integrated Crop Management News

The Corn and Soybean Initiative is a new effort at Iowa State University to better serve the needs of Iowa's number-one-in-the-nation corn and soybean growers. "Iowa has the best crop producers in the country and they just keep getting better," said Greg Tylka, coordinator of the initiative and a professor of plant pathology. "Iowa State's Corn and Soybean Initiative will work to make sure that trend continues by providing a central access point for research-based production information and education.


Workshop In Using Living Mulch Systems For Grain Crop Production, Palle Pedersen, Jodee Roland Dec 2004

Workshop In Using Living Mulch Systems For Grain Crop Production, Palle Pedersen, Jodee Roland

Integrated Crop Management News

Incorporation of perennial legumes and cover crops into our row cropping systems and reduction of tillage will reduce soil erosion and concurrent loss of phosphorous and nitrogen to the surface water. Kura clover (Trifolium ambiguum) is a relatively new forage legume in North America that can be used in a living mulch system. It has an excellent forage yield and is persistent under a wide range of soil and climatic environments. Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, and Integrated Farm/Livestock Management Demonstration Program, with the assistance of Iowa State University Extension, are currently funding a large on-farm demonstration ...


Commercial Pesticide Applicator Training Sessions For Spring 2005, James A. Fawcett, Virgil L. Schmitt Dec 2004

Commercial Pesticide Applicator Training Sessions For Spring 2005, James A. Fawcett, Virgil L. Schmitt

Integrated Crop Management News

With the arrival of Asian soybean rust in this country, many commercial applicators are adding agricultural diseases (category 1C) to their certification so that they can apply fungicides. Most agricultural commercial applicators are certified in Ag Weeds (category 1A), and many are certified in Ag Insects (category 1B), but not very many are certified in Ag Diseases (category 1C).


Two-Year Summary Of Corn Rootworm Insecticides And Yieldgard® Rootworm, Marlin E. Rice, James Oleson Nov 2004

Two-Year Summary Of Corn Rootworm Insecticides And Yieldgard® Rootworm, Marlin E. Rice, James Oleson

Integrated Crop Management News

Two integrated pest management strategies are commonly used to protect corn roots from corn rootworm injury: crop rotation and insecticides. If corn is not rotated, or if extended diapause northern corn rootworms occur in a field, a soil insecticide might be necessary to protect the roots in 2005. The reason we say it might be necessary is because many fields do not have a rootworm population of a sufficient size to cause economic damage. There are thousands of continuous cornfields across Iowa in which a rootworm insecticide is not used and is not necessary.


Icm Conference December 1-2, 2004, Brent A. Pringnitz Nov 2004

Icm Conference December 1-2, 2004, Brent A. Pringnitz

Integrated Crop Management News

The 16th Annual Integrated Crop Management Conference (ICM) will be held December 1 and 2 at the Iowa State Center on the Iowa State University campus in Ames. Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. on December 1 in Stephens Auditorium, and the conference concludes at 4:00 p.m. on December 2. During the conference participants will hear of Iowa's expanding ethanol industry and the impact that will have on grain marketing and agronomics.


Scn-Resistant Soybean Varieties Listed In Updated Publication, Gregory L. Tylka Nov 2004

Scn-Resistant Soybean Varieties Listed In Updated Publication, Gregory L. Tylka

Integrated Crop Management News

Soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is a serious and widespread pest of soybean throughout Iowa and the Midwest. Fortunately, SCN-resistant soybean varieties have been developed and are an effective management tool. To assist growers in choosing SCN-resistant varieties, Iowa State University Extension annually compiles and publishes a list of public and private SCN-resistant soybean varieties in maturity groups I, II, and III.


Soybean Rust First Detector Training Session Announced, Gregory L. Tylka, Brent A. Pringnitz Nov 2004

Soybean Rust First Detector Training Session Announced, Gregory L. Tylka, Brent A. Pringnitz

Integrated Crop Management News

Asian soybean rust is a topic of great interest among Iowa soybean growers and agribusiness. The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, the Iowa Soybean Association and Promotion Board, and Iowa State University have formed the Iowa Soybean Rust Team and have developed a system in Iowa whereby soybean samples that are suspected of possibly being infected with soybean rust can be examined and passed through a sequence of trained personnel to offer Iowa soybean growers rapid and accurate identification of the disease.


Asian Soybean Rust Confirmed In The Continental United States, Alison E. Robertson Nov 2004

Asian Soybean Rust Confirmed In The Continental United States, Alison E. Robertson

Integrated Crop Management News

On November 10, 2004, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship announced that Asian soybean rust has been confirmed near Baton Rouge, LA. The fields where the rust was found are located on research farms belonging to Louisiana State University. No information was given on the stage of plant growth in the fields. Most of the commercial fields in Louisiana have been harvested. X.B. Yang, Iowa State University plant pathologist, is one of the leading experts in the world and has flown down to Louisiana as a member of the ...


Fourth Iowa Organic Conference A Success, Kathleen Delate Nov 2004

Fourth Iowa Organic Conference A Success, Kathleen Delate

Integrated Crop Management News

Stanley Johnson, vice-provost for Extension at Iowa State University, welcomed the crowd of 295 registrants at the Fourth Annual Iowa Organic Conference in the Scheman Building on Monday, November 1, 2004, to the home of the "best organic research and extension program in the United States," according to Rodale Press.


Corn Ear Molds And Mycotoxins In Fall 2003, Gary P. Munkvold Oct 2004

Corn Ear Molds And Mycotoxins In Fall 2003, Gary P. Munkvold

Integrated Crop Management News

There has been elevated concern again this year about mycotoxins in grain, especially aflatoxins. Aflatoxins are not a common problem in Iowa, but the dry weather that occurred in some parts of the state caused stress on the plants, which lead to aflatoxin problems. Corn plants that experience drought stress are more susceptible than usual to the fungus that produces aflatoxins, Aspergillus flavus.


2004 Ag Chemical Dealer Updates, Brent A. Pringnitz Oct 2004

2004 Ag Chemical Dealer Updates, Brent A. Pringnitz

Integrated Crop Management News

Crop production changes at a rapid pace. New products, label revisions, regulatory requirements, soil nutrient recommendations--just some of the items you need to stay up to date on to better serve your customers. The Ag Chemical Dealer Updates are designed to do just that. The Ag Chemical Dealer Updates are intended to deliver the latest crop production recommendations, news, and information directly from Iowa State University Extension.


Check Seed Quality At Harvest, X. B. Yang Oct 2004

Check Seed Quality At Harvest, X. B. Yang

Integrated Crop Management News

This growing season, diseases caused by Cercospora fungi were widespread in Iowa. There were twoCercospora species, one causing frogeye leaf spot and another causing Cercospora leaf blight. Frogeye leaf spot occurred locally in southern Iowa and Cercospora leaf blight was widely spread throughout Iowa. In some cases, Cercospora leaf blight has been called "sunburn." Because fungi of both diseases can infect seeds at harvest, it is likely that soybean from some fields show seed discoloration, which happened two years ago in northern Iowa. This article addresses the seed quality issue of this fall.


High Prices And Tight Supply Make Fertilization Decisions Tough, John E. Sawyer Oct 2004

High Prices And Tight Supply Make Fertilization Decisions Tough, John E. Sawyer

Integrated Crop Management News

Nitrogen (N) fertilizer prices have been high the past few years, and continue to be this fall. Additionally, other fertilizer products have increased in price, with supply shortages of potassium (K) fertilizer possible. Why is this occurring? Several factors are interacting to influence both supply and price. These include high natural gas price (main feedstock for manufacture of N fertilizer), closure of about one-quarter of the U.S.


Stinkhorns Spotted In Fields, Paula Flynn Oct 2004

Stinkhorns Spotted In Fields, Paula Flynn

Integrated Crop Management News

John Holmes, extension field crop specialist, reported that farmers are finding lots of stinkhorn mushrooms in soybean fields as they harvest. These fungi do not cause disease to plants or animals, but instead live a harmless existence on dead organic matter such as crop debris. They also are commonly found on decaying mulch. A stinkhorn begins life as an egg-like structure.


Midwest Rural And Agricultural Safety And Health Forum, Eileen Fisher Oct 2004

Midwest Rural And Agricultural Safety And Health Forum, Eileen Fisher

Integrated Crop Management News

Iowa's Center for Agricultural Safety and Health, the Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health, and The Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, The University of Iowa, are joining together to co-sponsor the Midwest Rural and Agricultural Safety and Health Forum on November 18-19, 2004, at the Holiday Inn in Coralville, Iowa.


Fall Is Prime Time To Sample Fields For Scn, Gregory L. Tylka Oct 2004

Fall Is Prime Time To Sample Fields For Scn, Gregory L. Tylka

Integrated Crop Management News

The soybean cyst nematode (SCN) is an extremely damaging and widespread pest of soybean in Iowa. The nematode infests approximately 70 percent of the fields statewide. However, SCN usually causes no obvious aboveground symptoms for many years after being introduced into a field. Consequently, many SCN-infested fields in Iowa have not been diagnosed. The lack of symptoms and subsequent missed diagnosis are unfortunate because the key to effective management of SCN is early detection, before large nematode population densities develop.


Corn Ear Rots, Alison E. Robertson Oct 2004

Corn Ear Rots, Alison E. Robertson

Integrated Crop Management News

This year does not appear to be a particularly bad year for ear rots. The season has been cooler than normal, and the weather has been fairly dry since silking. However, some field crop specialists have noticed ear rot problems, in particular, Diplodia ear rot. The incidence of corn ear rot should be determined before harvest for a number of reasons. First, ear rot diseases can reduce yield and quality of the corn harvest. Second, some of the fungi that infect corn ears may produce mycotoxins, which are harmful, and can be fatal, to livestock. Finally, ear rots can continue ...


Check Seed Quality At Harvest, X. B. Yang Oct 2004

Check Seed Quality At Harvest, X. B. Yang

Integrated Crop Management News

This growing season, diseases caused by Cercospora fungi were widespread in Iowa. There were twoCercospora species, one causing frogeye leaf spot and another causing Cercospora leaf blight. Frogeye leaf spot occurred locally in southern Iowa and Cercospora leaf blight was widely spread throughout Iowa. In some cases, Cercospora leaf blight has been called "sunburn." Because fungi of both diseases can infect seeds at harvest, it is likely that soybean from some fields show seed discoloration, which happened two years ago in northern Iowa. This article addresses the seed quality issue of this fall.


Residue Management After Harvest, Mahdi Al-Kaisi, H. Mark Hanna, Michael Tidman Oct 2004

Residue Management After Harvest, Mahdi Al-Kaisi, H. Mark Hanna, Michael Tidman

Integrated Crop Management News

As we are in the harvest season, producers are searching for the best way to manage their residue cover, particularly with corn. Some farmers manage their residue by chopping, bailing, or grazing in livestock operations. But before planning to use any of these options or others, and reducing corn residue cover after this year's harvest, one of the first things to plan for is the remaining crop residue coverage. With that in mind, producers need to ask themselves a series of questions.


Remember To Scout For Corn Stalk Rots, Alison E. Robertson Sep 2004

Remember To Scout For Corn Stalk Rots, Alison E. Robertson

Integrated Crop Management News

Stalk rot occurs to some extent in every cornfield in Iowa each year because as corn stalks mature, they naturally decay. However, stalk rot can occur prior to physiological maturity and is considered a disease problem, which reduces yields in two ways. First, affected plants die prematurely (Fig. 1) and therefore produce lightweight ears with poorly filled kernels. Second, and this is more common, plants with stalk rot easily lodge (Fig. 2), which makes harvesting difficult, and many ears are left in the field.


Note For Fall Soybean Diseases, X. B. Yang, Shrishail S. Navi Sep 2004

Note For Fall Soybean Diseases, X. B. Yang, Shrishail S. Navi

Integrated Crop Management News

It is well established that outbreaks of plant diseases are associated with extreme weather. This year's extreme weather created favorable conditions for several soybean diseases. Sudden death syndrome(SDS) was severe in southern Iowa, and severe outbreaks of white mold occurred in eastern Iowa. The two diseases also occurred in other parts of Iowa, and an article will address the management of the two diseases later this year. Besides these two diseases, several other diseases are prevalent in fall causing early defoliation, such as brown spot, Cercospora leaf blight, and brown stem rot. In this article, we will discuss ...


Continuing Instructional Courses, Fall 2004, Elizabeth Minner Sep 2004

Continuing Instructional Courses, Fall 2004, Elizabeth Minner

Integrated Crop Management News

Pesticide use in Iowa is regulated under the Pesticide Act of Iowa. Iowa State University Extension provides raining and certification programs for commercial pesticide applicators in Iowa. Several fall courses are scheduled.


Soil Samping For Future Manure Management Plans, Angela M. Rieck-Hinz Sep 2004

Soil Samping For Future Manure Management Plans, Angela M. Rieck-Hinz

Integrated Crop Management News

By the time this newsletter hits your mailbox, harvest season will have begun in Iowa and soil sampling will follow shortly behind the combines. Soil sampling is just one part of the soil testing process that eventually leads to fertilizer recommendations, and now soil sampling will be a requirement for those fields receiving manure as part of a state-required manure management plan using the new P-index plans as regulated by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (IDNR).


Hitch And Go Safely This Harvest Season, Jean Mcguire Sep 2004

Hitch And Go Safely This Harvest Season, Jean Mcguire

Integrated Crop Management News

Each harvest season some loaded wagons go into the ditch due to an inability of the towing vehicle and braking system to control the load. There are a number of reasons that these loads go out of control, according to Mark Hanna and Chuck Schwab, Iowa State University Extension agricultural engineers. "First, some drivers who offer to help reduce the harvest rush are not experienced with towing loads," said Hanna.


Note For Fall Soybean Diseases, X. B. Yang, Shrishail S. Navi Sep 2004

Note For Fall Soybean Diseases, X. B. Yang, Shrishail S. Navi

Integrated Crop Management News

It is well established that outbreaks of plant diseases are associated with extreme weather. This year's extreme weather created favorable conditions for several soybean diseases. Sudden death syndrome(SDS) was severe in southern Iowa, and severe outbreaks of white mold occurred in eastern Iowa. The two diseases also occurred in other parts of Iowa, and an article will address the management of the two diseases later this year.


The Role Of Pasture In Conservation Management, Mahdi Al-Kaisi, H. Mark Hanna, Michael Tidman Aug 2004

The Role Of Pasture In Conservation Management, Mahdi Al-Kaisi, H. Mark Hanna, Michael Tidman

Integrated Crop Management News

Pasture is a longtime and significant part of Iowa agriculture and is a critical component of the state's agricultural landscape. The main function of pasture is as a primary support system for livestock. It can affect conservation and the environmental planning in several ways, including soil carbon storage, soil quality, and water quality. The effect of livestock on such parameters is highly significant depending on the way livestock and pasture are managed. Therefore, pasture management does play an important role in a farming operation's overall conservation management plan.


Diseases Show Up Earlier In 2004, X. B. Yang Aug 2004

Diseases Show Up Earlier In 2004, X. B. Yang

Integrated Crop Management News

Since the third week of July, a few diseases (white mold, sudden death syndrome, and downy mildew) started to show up in Iowa soybean fields. These diseases normally aren't seen until early August. This season's cool weather has promoted their unusually early occurrence.


Keven Arrowsmith Begins As Icm Editor, Keven Arrowsmith Aug 2004

Keven Arrowsmith Begins As Icm Editor, Keven Arrowsmith

Integrated Crop Management News

Hello. My name is Keven Arrowsmith. I am the new managing editor of the Integrated Crop Management newsletter. I grew up in Orient, located 12 miles north of Creston, in southwest Iowa. Orient is the birthplace of Henry A. Wallace, who developed the first commercially viable strain of hybrid corn, and served as secretary of agriculture, vice president, and secretary of commerce during Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration.


Long-Legged Flies In Crops, Marlin E. Rice Aug 2004

Long-Legged Flies In Crops, Marlin E. Rice

Integrated Crop Management News

It is not unusual to find something in corn or soybeans that normally does not occur there. This year, a species of long-legged fly is abundant, especially in soybeans, but it is not a pest of either this crop or corn. The adult fly is a metallic green and copper with clear or patterned wings, and of course, long legs. Adults are common in damp woods and fields, and along streams, where they can be found running in circles on leaves.