Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2004

PDF

University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Papers in Entomology

Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

The Revised Classification For Scarabaeoidea: What The Hell Is Going On?, Brett C. Ratcliffe, Mary Liz Jameson Nov 2004

The Revised Classification For Scarabaeoidea: What The Hell Is Going On?, Brett C. Ratcliffe, Mary Liz Jameson

Papers in Entomology

Considering the turmoil and vast changes in the classification of the superfamily Scarabaeoidea during the last 20 years, particularly in North America, we were asked to provide an update for the readers of Scarabs wherein we offer our perspectives. Much of what follows is extracted from our scarabaeoid introduction in American Beetles (Jameson and Ratcliffe 2002). By the time this overview is printed, there may have been more changes in the classification because of the rapidly accumulating evidence supporting new hypotheses.

These rapid changes are a result of intensified study of the family groups using both traditional morphological evidence combined ...


Larvae Of Ceratocanthidae And Hybosoridae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea): Study Of Morphology, Phylogenetic Analysis And Evidence Of Paraphyly Of Hybosoridae, Vasily V. Grebennikov, Alberto Ballerio, Federico C. Ocampo, Clarke E. Scholtz Oct 2004

Larvae Of Ceratocanthidae And Hybosoridae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea): Study Of Morphology, Phylogenetic Analysis And Evidence Of Paraphyly Of Hybosoridae, Vasily V. Grebennikov, Alberto Ballerio, Federico C. Ocampo, Clarke E. Scholtz

Papers in Entomology

Larvae of the scarabaeoid genera Germarostes Paulian, Cyphopisthes Gestro, Paulianostes Ballerio, Ceratocanthus White, Pterorthochaetes Gestro, Madrasostes Paulian, Astaenomoechus Martínez & Pereira (Ceratocanthidae) and Hybosorus Macleay, Phaeochrous Castelnau, and Anaides Westwood (Hybosoridae) are described, keyed and illustrated with fifty-seven drawings. A phylogenetic analysis of these two families based on larval morphology is presented. Fifty-four larval morphological and three biological characters from twenty-seven taxa revealed nineteen equally parsimonious cladograms. The monophyly of (Ceratocanthidae + Hybosoridae) is supported by four unambiguous unique synapomorphies: dorsal medial endocarina on cranium extended anteriorly into frontal sclerite; presence of large membranous spot on apical antennomere; labium dorsally with four pores in center (secondarily reduced to two pores in some groups); and presence of stridulatory organ on fore- and middle legs (secondarily reduced in some groups). Our analysis suggests that the family Hybosoridae is paraphyletic with respect to Ceratocanthidae. The clade comprising the hybosorid genera Hybosorus and Phaeochrous is the sister group of the remaining Hybosoridae plus Ceratocanthidae. It is supported by two unambiguous synapomorphies: two apical antennomeres completely ...


Clarification On The Nomenclatural Status Of Six Genus-Group Names In The Tribe Trichiini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae), Andrew Smith Jul 2004

Clarification On The Nomenclatural Status Of Six Genus-Group Names In The Tribe Trichiini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae), Andrew Smith

Papers in Entomology

Six genus-group names in the tribe Trichiini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae) are discussed with regards to their availability and validity under the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature. Aleurostictus Kirby, Archimedius Kirby, Euclidius Kirby, Gymnodus Kirby, Tetrophthalmus Kirby, and Trichinus Kirby all have priority over most other generic names in the tribe but none of the names are in prevailing usage. Clarifications are needed due to the reemergence of Aleurostictus Kirby in current literature and confusion over the nomenclatural status of the other names. Type species are designated for Aleurostictus Kirby, Tetrophthalmus Kirby, and Stegopterus Burmeister and Schaum. The gender of the ...


Food Relocation Behavior And Synopsis Of The Southern South American Genus Glyphoderus Westwood (Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae: Eucraniini), Federico C. Ocampo Jun 2004

Food Relocation Behavior And Synopsis Of The Southern South American Genus Glyphoderus Westwood (Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae: Eucraniini), Federico C. Ocampo

Papers in Entomology

The Argentinean endemic Eucraniini genus Glyphoderus Westwood is redescribed, a key to species and a synopsis of the three known species, . centralis Burmeister, G. monticola Burmeister, and G. sterquilinus (Westwood) is presented. The biology and food relocation behavior of the three species are described. A key to genera of the tribe Eucranini is also presented.


Comments On The Proposed Precedence Of Bolboceras Kirby, 1819 (July) (Insecta, Coleoptera) Over Odonteus Samouelle, 1819 (June), Andrew Smith Jun 2004

Comments On The Proposed Precedence Of Bolboceras Kirby, 1819 (July) (Insecta, Coleoptera) Over Odonteus Samouelle, 1819 (June), Andrew Smith

Papers in Entomology

I support the application to give Bolboceras Kirby, 1819 (July) precedence over Odonteus Samouelle, 1819 (June). This action is necessary to preserve the prevailing usage of the former generic name for the North American species Bolboceras alabamensis (Wallis, 1929), B. cornigerus Melsheimer, 1846, B. darlingtoni (Walhs, 1928), B. falli (Wallis, 1928), B. filicornis (Say, 1823), B. floridensis (Walhs, 1928), B. liebecki (Wallis, 1928), B. obesus (LeConte, 1859), B. simi (Walhs, 1928), and B. thoracicornis (Wallis, 1928). These species have been universally placed in the genus Bolboceras for over 50 years. B. armiger (Scopoli, 1772), the one remaining species in the ...


Book Review: Revision Of The Genera Odontotrypes And Phelotrupes (Kra L, D., V. Maly, And J. Schneider, 2001), Federico C. Ocampo Apr 2004

Book Review: Revision Of The Genera Odontotrypes And Phelotrupes (Kra L, D., V. Maly, And J. Schneider, 2001), Federico C. Ocampo

Papers in Entomology

This publication contains a detailed revision of two genera of Geotrupidae (Scarabaeoidea): Odontotrypes and Phelotrupes. The text is in English and includes a short introduction and taxonomic history of the two genera. Descriptions, label data, distribution, and illustrations are provided for all species in these genera. Although no generic descriptions are provided, a key to the eastern Asian genera of Geotrupinae provides the diagnostic characters need for identification.


Book Review: Scarab Beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Of South Carolina (Harpootlian, Phillip J. 2001), M. J. Paulsen Apr 2004

Book Review: Scarab Beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Of South Carolina (Harpootlian, Phillip J. 2001), M. J. Paulsen

Papers in Entomology

In Scarab Beetles of South Carolina, Harpootlian has clearly channeled a love of collecting and nomenclature into a valuable publication that fills a void in the identification of the North American scarab fauna. This effectively illustrated work covers 289 taxa and provides keys to adults for all genera and species of scarabs from South Carolina. Each species treatment includes synonymies, brief descriptions, months of adult activity, South Carolina county records, and broad geographical distribution. Whenever possible, the author has included additional remarks highlighting life history information or label data that all researchers and collectors crave. Generic synonymies and descriptions are ...


A New Sampling Protocol For The Endangered American Burying Beetle, Nicrophorus Americanus Olivier (Coleoptera: Silphidae), Jon C. Bedick, Brett C. Ratcliffe, Leon G. Higley Mar 2004

A New Sampling Protocol For The Endangered American Burying Beetle, Nicrophorus Americanus Olivier (Coleoptera: Silphidae), Jon C. Bedick, Brett C. Ratcliffe, Leon G. Higley

Papers in Entomology

The endangered American burying beetle, Nicrophorus americanus Olivier, presently occurs in small and widely scattered areas on the periphery of its former range. As part of the recovery plan for this insect implemented by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), we conducted surveys in Nebraska to ascertain its presence. Additionally, we examined various trapping methods and procedures in the course of our survey work. We compared the effectiveness of different trap designs, trap placement, timing of trapping, types and amounts of bait, and monitoring traps. We also developed methods to reduce beetle mortality in traps. Our work offers ...


Comments On The Proposed Precedence Of Bolboceras Kirby, 1819 (July) (Insecta, Coleoptera) Over Odonteus Samouelle, 1819 (June), Brett C. Ratcliffe Mar 2004

Comments On The Proposed Precedence Of Bolboceras Kirby, 1819 (July) (Insecta, Coleoptera) Over Odonteus Samouelle, 1819 (June), Brett C. Ratcliffe

Papers in Entomology

(Case 3097; see BZN 59: 246-248, 280-281; 60: 303-311)

I support the application to use Bolboceras Kirby, 1819 (July) instead of Odonteus Samouelle 1819 (June) because of prevailing usage of the name Bolboceras. The name Odonteus has not been used since it was first proposed except by Krell in 1990, who suggested that Odonteus should be used since it had priority. To do so, however, would not only destabilize the nomenclature for the often cited genus name Bolboceras, but it would also decrease the flow of information that is normally associated with the name Bolboceras. Moreover, Bolboceras is also the ...


A New Subspecies Of Cicindela Nevadica Leconte (Coleoptera: Carbidae: Cicindelinae) From The Badlands Of South Dakota, Stephen M. Spomer Jan 2004

A New Subspecies Of Cicindela Nevadica Leconte (Coleoptera: Carbidae: Cicindelinae) From The Badlands Of South Dakota, Stephen M. Spomer

Papers in Entomology

A new subspecies of Cicindela nevadica LeConte, Cicindela nevadica makosika Spomer, is described from the South Dakota Badlands. Geographically, the population occurs at the periphery of the range of C. nevadica knausii Leng. However, this new population is geographically isolated from the nearest C. n. knausii populations, which occur ca. 100 air miles north and over 100 air miles south. Phenotypically, C. n. makosika appears most similar to C. n. tubensis Cazier from northeast Arizona. A possible threat to this population is habitat destruction by cattle.