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Abomasal Parasites In Wild Sympatric Cervids, Red Deer, Cervus Elaphus, And Fallow Deer, Dama Dama, From Three Localities Across Central And Western Spain: Relationship To Host Density And Park Management, Mónica Santín-Durán, José M. Alunda, Eric P. Hoberg, Concepción De La Fuente Dec 2004

Abomasal Parasites In Wild Sympatric Cervids, Red Deer, Cervus Elaphus, And Fallow Deer, Dama Dama, From Three Localities Across Central And Western Spain: Relationship To Host Density And Park Management, Mónica Santín-Durán, José M. Alunda, Eric P. Hoberg, Concepción De La Fuente

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

A survey of abomasal parasites in cervids from Central Spain was conducted at three sites, Quintos de Mora (Toledo), Maluéñez de Arriba (Cáceres), and La Herguijuela (Cáceres). Commonly occurring helminths belonged to three polymorphic species of the Ostertagiinae: Spiculopteragia asymmetrica/S. quadrispiculata, Ostertagia leptospicularis/O. kolchida, and O. drozdzi/O. ryjikovi. Trichostrongylus axei was found in very few cases. Ostertagia drozdzi/O. ryjikovi and the minor male morphotype, S. quadrispiculata, are reported for the first time in red deer from Spain. The three ostertagiine species are also reported for the first time in fallow deer from Spain. These three species ...


American Society Of Parasitologists Newsletter, V. 26, No. 3, Fall 2004, Scott Lyell Gardner Oct 2004

American Society Of Parasitologists Newsletter, V. 26, No. 3, Fall 2004, Scott Lyell Gardner

Newsletter of the American Society of Parasitologists

An issue of the American Society of Parasitologists' quarterly newsletter, also called the Journal of Parasitology Newsletter.


Phylogeny For Species Of Haemonchus (Nematoda: Trichostrongyloidea): Considerations Of Their Evolutionary History And Global Biogeography Among Camelidae And Pecora (Artiodactyla), Eric P. Hoberg, J. Ralph Lichtenfels, Lynda M. Gibbons Oct 2004

Phylogeny For Species Of Haemonchus (Nematoda: Trichostrongyloidea): Considerations Of Their Evolutionary History And Global Biogeography Among Camelidae And Pecora (Artiodactyla), Eric P. Hoberg, J. Ralph Lichtenfels, Lynda M. Gibbons

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Phylogenetic analysis of 25 morphological characters among the 12 species of Haemonchus resulted in one most parsimonious tree (60 steps; consistency index 5 0.67, retention index 5 0.80). Monophyly for Haemonchus was diagnosed by three unequivocal synapomorphies, including the asymmetric origin of the dorsal ray, relative size of the ventral rays, and the presence of a barb on each spicule tip. Species of Haemonchus have complex histories with respect to host and geographic associations: (1) origins in Africa with basal diversification in antelopes (H. krugeri, H. lawrencei, H. dinniki, H. horaki), (2) independent events of colonization for those ...


Two Species Of Synhimantus (Dispharynx) Railliet, Henry And Sisoff, 1912 (Nematoda: Acuarioidea: Acuariidae), In Passerine Birds From The Área De Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica, Luping Zhang, Daniel R. Brooks, Douglas Causey Oct 2004

Two Species Of Synhimantus (Dispharynx) Railliet, Henry And Sisoff, 1912 (Nematoda: Acuarioidea: Acuariidae), In Passerine Birds From The Área De Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica, Luping Zhang, Daniel R. Brooks, Douglas Causey

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Members of 2 species of Synhimantus (Dispharynx) live under the lining of the gizzard in passerine birds from the Área de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Synhimantus (Dispharynx) nasuta (Rudolphi, 1819) occurs in Thraupis episcopus, Turdus grayi, Caryothraustes poliogaster, Platyrinchus cancrominus, Ramphocaenus melanurus, Vermivora peregrina, and Geothlypis poliocephala. A single male, in Turdus grayi, apparently representing a new species, distinguishable from all other species of Synhimantus (Dispharynx) by having similar shaped left and right spicules, is described but not named.


New Species Of Cinclotaenia Macy, 1973 (Cyclophyllidea: Dilepididae) From Cinclus Leucocephalus Tschudi (Passeriformes: Cinclidae) In Bolivia, Boyko B. Georgiev, Scott Lyell Gardner Oct 2004

New Species Of Cinclotaenia Macy, 1973 (Cyclophyllidea: Dilepididae) From Cinclus Leucocephalus Tschudi (Passeriformes: Cinclidae) In Bolivia, Boyko B. Georgiev, Scott Lyell Gardner

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Two new species of Cinclotaenia (Cyclophyllidea: Dilepididae) are described from the small intestine of Cinclus leucocephalus (Aves: Passeriformes: Cinclidae) collected in the Yungas region of Bolivia. Cinclotaenia minuta n. sp. is characterized by possessing a minute strobila with a maximum body length of 1.58 mm, consisting of 5–10 proglottids, 19–22 rostellar hooks with lengths from 16 to 17 mm, 12–17 testes per proglottid, and eggs forming packets without filaments. Cinclotaenia boliviensis n. sp. has bandlike strobila with a length up to 26 mm with 67–74 proglittids, 22 rostellar hooks with length 39–42 mm, 43 ...


Observations On Myiasis By The Calliphorids, Bufolucilia Silvarum And Bufolucilia Elongata, In Wood Frogs, Rana Sylvatica, From Southeastern Wisconsin, Matthew G. Bolek, John J. Janovy Jr. Oct 2004

Observations On Myiasis By The Calliphorids, Bufolucilia Silvarum And Bufolucilia Elongata, In Wood Frogs, Rana Sylvatica, From Southeastern Wisconsin, Matthew G. Bolek, John J. Janovy Jr.

John Janovy Publications

Larvae of certain species of blowflies (Calliphoridae) can cause myiasis in frogs and toads, but there are few reports from North American amphibians. Of these, most are from toads (bufonids). In this study, we observe primary myiasis in a population of juvenile wood frogs, Rana sylvatica, collected on August 22-23, 2003, from southeastern Wisconsin and compare our observations with previous studies on myiasis from toads. Two (5%) of 39 frogs were infected by the blow fly Bufolucilia silvarum, with an intensity of 28 and 31, whereas 1 (2.5%) of 39 frogs was infected by the blow fly Bufolucilia elongata ...


A New Species Of Pelecitus (Filarioidea: Onchocercidae) From The Endnagered Tehuantepec Jackrabbit Lepus Flavigularis, F. Agustin Jimenez-Ruiz, Scott Lyell Gardner, Fernando A. Cervantes, Consuelo Lorenzo Aug 2004

A New Species Of Pelecitus (Filarioidea: Onchocercidae) From The Endnagered Tehuantepec Jackrabbit Lepus Flavigularis, F. Agustin Jimenez-Ruiz, Scott Lyell Gardner, Fernando A. Cervantes, Consuelo Lorenzo

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Pelecitus meridionaleporinus n. sp. from the Tehuantepec jackrabbit is described. The new species differs from Pelecitus helicinus (Molin, 1860) in having delicate transverse striations, a salient vulva, and a readily apparent preesophageal ring; P. helicinus has teardrop cells around the vulva, which are lacking in the species presently described. The new species is different from Pelecitus scapiceps (Leidy, 1886) in having the vulva anterior to the esophageal–intestinal junction and wider lateral alae. Pelecitus scapiceps is found in the tarsal bursa of the hind feet of lagomorphs, whereas P. helicinus is found around tendons of legs and feet of birds ...


Review Of Parasites And Diseases Of Wild Birds In Florida By D. J. Forrester And M. G. Spalding; University Press Of Florida, 2003, John J. Janovy Jr. Aug 2004

Review Of Parasites And Diseases Of Wild Birds In Florida By D. J. Forrester And M. G. Spalding; University Press Of Florida, 2003, John J. Janovy Jr.

John Janovy Publications

Review of Parasites and Diseases of Wild Birds in Florida by D. J. Forrester and M. G. Spalding, publsihed by the University Press of Florida, 2003; ISBN: 0-8130-2560-5.


American Society Of Parasitologists Newsletter, V. 26, No. 2, Summer 2004, Scott Lyell Gardner Jul 2004

American Society Of Parasitologists Newsletter, V. 26, No. 2, Summer 2004, Scott Lyell Gardner

Newsletter of the American Society of Parasitologists

An issue of the American Society of Parasitologists' quarterly newsletter, also called the Journal of Parasitology Newsletter.


Torquatoides Trogoni N. Sp. And Excisa Ramphastina N. Sp. (Nematoda: Habronematoidea: Habronematidae) In Birds From The Área De Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica, Luping Zhang, Daniel R. Brooks Jun 2004

Torquatoides Trogoni N. Sp. And Excisa Ramphastina N. Sp. (Nematoda: Habronematoidea: Habronematidae) In Birds From The Área De Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica, Luping Zhang, Daniel R. Brooks

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Two new species of habronematid nematodes are described in birds from the Area de Conservacion Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Torquatoides trogoni n. sp., in Trogon massena, can be distinguished from T. torquata, T. bengalensis, and T. crotophaga in lacking lateral alae. Among species lacking lateral alae, the new species differs from T. balanocephala in having 14 versus 8-10 cephalic cuticular plaques, 21-22 versus 13-17 pairs of preanal papillae, and a beak-shaped versus U-shaped gubernaculum. The new species differs from T. singhi in body length, in having 21-22 versus 10 pairs of precloacal papillae, longer spicules, and larger eggs. The new species ...


Comments On The Gonotyl Of Proctocaecum Macroclemidis (Tkach And Snyder, 2003) N. Comb. (Digenea: Acanthostomidae: Acanthostominae), With A Key To The Genera Of Acanthostominae And New Phylogenetic Tree For Proctocaecum Baugh, 1957, Daniel R. Brooks Jun 2004

Comments On The Gonotyl Of Proctocaecum Macroclemidis (Tkach And Snyder, 2003) N. Comb. (Digenea: Acanthostomidae: Acanthostominae), With A Key To The Genera Of Acanthostominae And New Phylogenetic Tree For Proctocaecum Baugh, 1957, Daniel R. Brooks

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

The species recently described as Acanthostomum macroclemidis possesses the gonotyl in the form of a solid muscular pad uniquely diagnostic for species of Proctocaecum and is accordingly transferred to that genus. An artificial key to the 5 acanthostomine genera, as well as an updated phylogenetic hypothesis for the 10 known species of Proctocaecum, based on 11 characters and including 2 species described since the last phylogenetic analysis, are presented. The single most parsimonious phylogenetic tree with a consistency index of 87.5% suggests that Proctocaecum originated in Africa and spread to North America and South America before the breakup of ...


Prevalence Of Parasites In Amphipods Diporeia Spp. From Lakes Michigan And Huron, Usa, Gretchen A. Messick, Robin M. Overstreet, Thomas F. Nalepa, Sue Tyler May 2004

Prevalence Of Parasites In Amphipods Diporeia Spp. From Lakes Michigan And Huron, Usa, Gretchen A. Messick, Robin M. Overstreet, Thomas F. Nalepa, Sue Tyler

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Amphipods of Diporeia spp. have declined considerably during the last decade in the Great Lakes. We examined the possibility that disease may be affecting these populations. A histological survey assessed the parasites in species of Diporeia within Lakes Huron and Michigan, USA, and the host response to some of them and to unknown factors. Amphipods were found to have an intranuclear inclusion body, and were hosts to a rickettsia-like organism, fungi, a haplosporidian, a microsporidian, epibiotic ciliates, a gregarine, a cestode, acanthocephalans and nodule formations. Epibiotic ciliates were most common (37% prevalence of infection), but a microsporidian (3.8%), a ...


American Society Of Parasitologists Newsletter, V. 26, No. 1, Spring 2004, Scott Lyell Gardner Apr 2004

American Society Of Parasitologists Newsletter, V. 26, No. 1, Spring 2004, Scott Lyell Gardner

Newsletter of the American Society of Parasitologists

An issue of the American Society of Parasitologists' quarterly newsletter, also called the Journal of Parasitology Newsletter.


“Emerging” Parasitic Infections In Arctic Ungulates, Susan J. Kutz, Eric P. Hoberg, John Nagy, Lydden Polley, Brett Elkin Apr 2004

“Emerging” Parasitic Infections In Arctic Ungulates, Susan J. Kutz, Eric P. Hoberg, John Nagy, Lydden Polley, Brett Elkin

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Important drivers for emergence of infectious disease in wildlife include changes in the environment, shrinking habitats or concentration of wildlife, and movement of people, animals, pathogens, or vectors. In this paper we present three case-studies of emerging parasitic infections and diseases in ungulates in the Canadian north. First we discuss climate warming as an important driver for the emergence of disease associated with Umingmakstrongylus pallikuukensis, a nematode lungworm of muskoxen. Then we examine how Protostrongylus stilesi, the sheep lungworm, emerged (or re-emerged) in muskoxen after re-introduction of this host into its historical range made it sympatric with Dall’s sheep ...


Procyrnea Chabaud, 1958 (Nematoda: Habronematoidea: Habronematidae) In Birds From The Area De Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica, Including Descriptions Of 3 New Species, Luping Zhang, Daniel R. Brooks, Douglas Causey Apr 2004

Procyrnea Chabaud, 1958 (Nematoda: Habronematoidea: Habronematidae) In Birds From The Area De Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica, Including Descriptions Of 3 New Species, Luping Zhang, Daniel R. Brooks, Douglas Causey

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Four species of Procyrnea were collected in birds from the Área de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica. ,i>Procyrnea brevicaudata,/i> n. sp. in Crypturellus cinnamomeus resembles P. ficheuri, P. murrayi, P. ameerae, P. dollfusi, and P. aptera in lacking lateral alae but differs from all these species in having two longitudinal ridges on the left side of the body, in having a sinistral rather than ventral vulvar opening, and in having dorsally bent rather than straight female tails. Procyrnea mawsonae n. sp., in Buteo magnirostris, is similar to P. strialata in body size and in having two transverse striated lateral ...


Parallopharynx Spp. (Trematoda: Digenea: Plagiorchioidea) In Iguanian Lizards From The Área De Conservación Guanacaste, Guanacaste, Costa Rica, Including Parallopharynx Matternae N. Sp. In Basiliscus Basiliscus (Squamata: Iguania: Corytophanidae), David Zamparo, Daniel R. Brooks, Vasyl Tkach, Beatriz Rodriguez Apr 2004

Parallopharynx Spp. (Trematoda: Digenea: Plagiorchioidea) In Iguanian Lizards From The Área De Conservación Guanacaste, Guanacaste, Costa Rica, Including Parallopharynx Matternae N. Sp. In Basiliscus Basiliscus (Squamata: Iguania: Corytophanidae), David Zamparo, Daniel R. Brooks, Vasyl Tkach, Beatriz Rodriguez

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

We report three species of the digenean genus Parallopharynx, one previously undescribed, from the Área de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG) in northwestern Costa Rica. Parallopharynx gonzalezi, which was originally described in Basiliscus sp. and Ctenosaura similis from central Costa Rica, inhabits C. quinquecarinata; P. jonesi, originally described in Anolis lionotus (syn. Norops oxylophus) from Nicaragua, inhabits N. oxylophus, N. biporcatus, and Basiliscus basiliscus; and the new species, which inhabits B. basiliscus. Parallopharynx matternae n. sp. differs from all other members of the genus by having a metraterm extending posteriad from the genital pore to the posterior margin of the ventral sucker ...


Life Cycle And Paratenesis Of American Gordiids (Nematomorpha: Gordiida), Ben Hanelt, John J. Janovy Jr. Apr 2004

Life Cycle And Paratenesis Of American Gordiids (Nematomorpha: Gordiida), Ben Hanelt, John J. Janovy Jr.

John Janovy Publications

To complete their life cycle, gordiids must make a transition from aquatic to terrestrial environments. However, epibenthic aquatic larvae and their terrestrial definitive hosts do not overlap in habitat. This has led many investigators to suggest that infections are acquired through the ingestion of insects, which become infected as aquatic larvae with gordiid cysts and subsequently carry gordiids to land. This proposed life cycle was experimentally tested using three common American species of gordiids: Gordius robustus, Paragordius varius, and Chordodes morgani. Cysts of all three species survived the metamorphosis of Tanytarsus sp., a midge. Subsequent infection trials of definitive hosts ...


Erroneous Reports Of The Neotropical Echinococcus Oligarthrus As A Cause Of Echinococcosis In India [Critical Comment], Antonio D'Alessandro, Robert L. Rausch Feb 2004

Erroneous Reports Of The Neotropical Echinococcus Oligarthrus As A Cause Of Echinococcosis In India [Critical Comment], Antonio D'Alessandro, Robert L. Rausch

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Two cases of submandibular echinococcosis have been reported in adult residents of India (Kini et al., 1997; Sahni et al., 2000). It was stated in both publications that the cestode was E. oligarthrus, "a rare variety of E. granulosus", based on morphogical characteristics. It was also mentioned that three cases of E. granulosus with similar submandibular metacestode had been previously diagnosed in India. The metacestode is readily distinguishable from that of E. oligarthrus. The final hosts of E. oligarthrus are several neotropical species of wild cats and metacestode occurs in hystricognath, all of them absent in India. The larval stage ...


Parapharyngodon Duniae N. Sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) In Phrynohyas Venulosa (Anura: Hylidae) From The Área De Conservación Guanacaste, Guanacaste, Costa Rica, Charles R. Bursey, Daniel R. Brooks Feb 2004

Parapharyngodon Duniae N. Sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) In Phrynohyas Venulosa (Anura: Hylidae) From The Área De Conservación Guanacaste, Guanacaste, Costa Rica, Charles R. Bursey, Daniel R. Brooks

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Parapharyngodon duniae n. sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) in the large intestine of the veined tree frog, Phrynohyas venulosa, from the Área de Conservación Guanacaste in northwestern Costa Rica is described and illustrated. Parapharyngodon duniae n. sp. represents the 34th species assigned to the genus, the 10th species from the Neotropical Realm, and only the third species to parasitize anurans. It is distinguished from the other Neotropical species by having postbulbar ovaries and a prebulbar excretory pore.


Mapping The Presence Of Wolbachia Pipientis On The Phylogeny Of Filarial Nematodes: Evidence For Symbiont Loss During Evolution, Maurizio Casiraghi, Odile Bain, Ricardo Guerrero, Coralie Martin, Vanessa Pocacqua, Scott Lyell Gardner, Alberto Francheschi, Claudio Bandi Feb 2004

Mapping The Presence Of Wolbachia Pipientis On The Phylogeny Of Filarial Nematodes: Evidence For Symbiont Loss During Evolution, Maurizio Casiraghi, Odile Bain, Ricardo Guerrero, Coralie Martin, Vanessa Pocacqua, Scott Lyell Gardner, Alberto Francheschi, Claudio Bandi

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Wolbachia pipientis is a bacterial endosymbiont associated with arthropods and filarial nematodes. In filarial nematodes, W. pipientis has been shown to play an important role in the biology of the host and in the immuno-pathology of filariasis. Several species of filariae, including the most important parasites of humans and animals (e.g. Onchocerca volvulus, Wuchereria bancrofti and Dirofilaria immitis) have been shown to harbor these bacteria. Other filarial species, including an important rodent species (Acanthocheilonema viteae), which has been used as a model for the study of filariasis, do not appear to harbor these symbionts. There are still several open ...


American Society Of Parasitologists Newsletter, V. 26, No. 4, Summer 2004, Scott Lyell Gardner Jan 2004

American Society Of Parasitologists Newsletter, V. 26, No. 4, Summer 2004, Scott Lyell Gardner

Newsletter of the American Society of Parasitologists

An issue of the American Society of Parasitologists' quarterly newsletter, also called the Journal of Parasitology Newsletter.


Paneak's Plants And Animals [In A Hungry Country: Appendix 1], Robert L. Rausch Jan 2004

Paneak's Plants And Animals [In A Hungry Country: Appendix 1], Robert L. Rausch

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

A list of plants and animals recognized by Simon Paneak (1900-1975), a Nunamiut Eskimo. Names are given in English and Iñupiaq, and their scientific names are provided.


The Southwestern Association Of Parasitologists: The First 35 Years: 1967–2002, Donald W. Duszynski Jan 2004

The Southwestern Association Of Parasitologists: The First 35 Years: 1967–2002, Donald W. Duszynski

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

First two paragraphs:

It is likely that the idea to organize southwestern parasitologists into a regional group originated over cocktails one night in the late 1950s during a regional or national meeting. What is clear is that two men—Drs. Robert E. Kuntz and Donald V. Moore— were instrumental in turning the idea into what has become, in reality, the Southwestern Association of Parasitologists (SWAP). Dr. J. Teague Self (personal communication, 1981) stated, “The beginning of SWAP was an idea of Robert Kuntz who felt that something could be gained if several of us here in the southwest could get ...


The Southwestern Association Of Parasitologists: The First 35 Years: 1967–2002, Donald W. Duszynski Jan 2004

The Southwestern Association Of Parasitologists: The First 35 Years: 1967–2002, Donald W. Duszynski

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

First two paragraphs:

It is likely that the idea to organize southwestern parasitologists into a regional group originated over cocktails one night in the late 1950s during a regional or national meeting. What is clear is that two men—Drs. Robert E. Kuntz and Donald V. Moore— were instrumental in turning the idea into what has become, in reality, the Southwestern Association of Parasitologists (SWAP).

Dr. J. Teague Self (personal communication, 1981) stated, “The beginning of SWAP was an idea of Robert Kuntz who felt that something could be gained if several of us here in the southwest could get ...


Cardicola Forsteri (Digenea: Sanguinicolidae) From The Heart Of A Northern Bluefin Tuna, Thunnus Thynnus (Scombridae), In The Northwest Atlantic Ocean, Stephen A. Bullard, Robert J. Goldstein, Robert H. Goodwin Iii, Robin M. Overstreet Jan 2004

Cardicola Forsteri (Digenea: Sanguinicolidae) From The Heart Of A Northern Bluefin Tuna, Thunnus Thynnus (Scombridae), In The Northwest Atlantic Ocean, Stephen A. Bullard, Robert J. Goldstein, Robert H. Goodwin Iii, Robin M. Overstreet

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

We report a specimen of Cardicola forsteri Cribb, Daintith, and Munday, 2000 (Digenea: Sanguinicolidae) from the lumen of the heart of a northern bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Scombridae), that was 218 cm in total length (TL) and caught in the northwest Atlantic Ocean 12 km south of Cape Lookout, North Carolina. The hearts of 12 similarly sized northern bluefin tuna (127–262 cm TL) from George’s Bank, northwest Atlantic Ocean, were not infected. This is the first report of C. forsteri from a wild host and of a sanguinicolid from any scombrid in the northwest Atlantic Ocean ...


Defeating Diplostomoid Dangers In Usa Catfish Aquaculture, Robin M. Overstreet, Stephen S. Curran Jan 2004

Defeating Diplostomoid Dangers In Usa Catfish Aquaculture, Robin M. Overstreet, Stephen S. Curran

Faculty Publications from the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology

Diplostomoid digenean metacercariae have caused widescale mortalities of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (Rafinesque), at aquaculture farms in Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas, USA. Originally, based on a tentative diagnosis, the industry considered the primary harmful agent to be an introduced species from Europe, Bolbophorus confusus (Krause, 1914), frequently reported from the American white pelican, Pelecanus erythrorhynchos Gmelin. Our group has now shown, using ITS 1-2 plus three more-conservative gene fragments, that two sympatric species of Bolbophorus exist in the American white pelican. One, B. damnificus Overstreet et Curran, 2002, infects the musculature of catfish, and the other, probably not B. confusus ...