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Endangered Species Bulletin, December 2004 - Vol. Xxix No. 2 Dec 2004

Endangered Species Bulletin, December 2004 - Vol. Xxix No. 2

Endangered Species Bulletins and Technical Reports (USFWS)

In this issue:
4 The Prairie Wetlands Learning Center
6 Reaching Out to “Save our Snakes”
8 Eider Journey
10 Slowing the Flow
12 Creative Partners, Creative Solutions
14 Teaching the Children: A Hawaiian Tradition
16 All it Takes is a Little Mussel
18 Bird Watchers Flock to Michigan
20 The Year of the Fish
23 The Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan for Kids
24 The Sewee Earth Stewards
26 This Bird is No Chicken
28 In Our Dreams….
30 Raising Awareness of Sea Turtle Habitat
32 Sea Turtle Trails
33 “Habitat Trunks” Delight Teachers
34 Welcome to Wildlife University
35 ...


Historical Biogeography Of The Woodchuck (Marmota Monax Bunkeri) In Nebraska And Northern Kansas, Zachary P. Roehrs, Hugh H. Genoways Aug 2004

Historical Biogeography Of The Woodchuck (Marmota Monax Bunkeri) In Nebraska And Northern Kansas, Zachary P. Roehrs, Hugh H. Genoways

Mammalogy Papers: University of Nebraska State Museum

Discusses the historical biogeography of the Woodchuck (Marmota monax bunkeri) in Nebraska and northern Kansas.

First paragraph:

Jones et al. described the western limit of Marmota monax in the United States as the eastern edge of the northern Great Plains in Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, and the Dakotas. Mengel introduced the idea of the Great Plains grasslands as a barrier to contact between birds of eastern and western North American forests. In his studies of bird biogeography on the Platte River, Knopf reported that this barrier has eroded with development of riparian forests along river courses of the Great Plains. This ...


Endangered And Threatened Wildlife And Plants; Final Designation Of Critical Habitat For The Topeka Shiner; Final Rule Jul 2004

Endangered And Threatened Wildlife And Plants; Final Designation Of Critical Habitat For The Topeka Shiner; Final Rule

Endangered Species Bulletins and Technical Reports (USFWS)

We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), designate critical habitat for the Topeka shiner (Notropis Topeka) pursuant to the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). We are designating as critical habitat a total of 83 stream segments, representing 1,356 kilometers (km) (836 miles (mi)) of stream in the States of Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska. We exclude from designation all previously proposed critical habitat in the State of Missouri under authority of sections 3(5)(A) and 4(b)(2) of the Act, and in the States of Kansas and South Dakota under authority of section ...


Higgins Eye Pearlymussel (Lampsilis Higginsii) Recovery Plan: First Revision May 2004

Higgins Eye Pearlymussel (Lampsilis Higginsii) Recovery Plan: First Revision

Endangered Species Bulletins and Technical Reports (USFWS)

TABLE OF CONTENTS:
DISCLAIMER

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

I. INTRODUCTION

Description of Lampsilis higginsii
Taxonomy and Systematics
Morphological Description
Historical and Present Distributions
Recent Reintroductions
Essential Habitat Areas
Critical Habitat
Biology, Ecology and Life History
Reproduction
Feeding
Habitat
Substrate
Stream Flow/Current/Hydrologic Variability
Water Quality
Water Quality Data Gaps
Community Associations
Non-human Predators
Genetics
Reasons for listing
Present Threats
Zebra Mussels and other Invasive Species
Habitat Alteration
Water Quality
Commercial Harvest
Conservation Measures
Ten-Year Field Studies in Essential Habitat Areas
Development of Relocation (Translocation) Techniques
Development of Artificial Propagation Techniques
Development of Uniform Regulations Concerning Clam Harvesting Methods
Summary of Current ...


Ten Suggestions To Strengthen The Science Of Ecology, Gary E. Belovsky, Daniel B. Botkin, Todd A. Crowl, Kenneth W. Cummins, Jerry F. Franklin, Malcolm L. Hunter, Anthony Joern, David B. Lindenmayer, James A. Macmahon, Chris R. Margules, J. Michael Scott Apr 2004

Ten Suggestions To Strengthen The Science Of Ecology, Gary E. Belovsky, Daniel B. Botkin, Todd A. Crowl, Kenneth W. Cummins, Jerry F. Franklin, Malcolm L. Hunter, Anthony Joern, David B. Lindenmayer, James A. Macmahon, Chris R. Margules, J. Michael Scott

Papers in Ecology

There are few well-documented, general ecological principles that can be applied to pressing environmental issues. When they discuss them at all, ecologists often disagree about the relative importance of different aspects of the science’s original and still important issues. It may be that the sum of ecological science is not open to universal statements because of the wide range of organizational, spatial, and temporal phenomena, as well as the sheer number of possible interactions.We believe, however, that the search for general principles has been inadequate to establish the extent to which generalities are possible.We suggest that ecologists ...


Endangered And Threatened Wildlife And Plants; Designation Of Critical Habitat For Topeka Shiner Mar 2004

Endangered And Threatened Wildlife And Plants; Designation Of Critical Habitat For Topeka Shiner

Endangered Species Bulletins and Technical Reports (USFWS)

We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce the reopening of a 30-day public comment period for the proposed rule to designate critical habitat for the Topeka shiner (Notropis Topeka) pursuant to the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act). The proposed rule to designate critical habitat in the States of Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, and South Dakota was published on August 21, 2002 (67 FR 54261). We herein propose critical habitat segments for Missouri and one additional segment for South Dakota, and discuss potential exclusions from critical habitat designation under the authority of section 4(b)(2 ...


Endangered Species Bulletin January/February 2004 - Vol. Xxix No. 1 Jan 2004

Endangered Species Bulletin January/February 2004 - Vol. Xxix No. 1

Endangered Species Bulletins and Technical Reports (USFWS)

In this issue:
4 Partnerships for Plant Conservation in Texas
6 The Upper San Pedro Partnership
10 Joining Forces for an Island of Biodiversity
12 Giving Nature a Second Chance
14 One Step Closer to Key Deer Recovery
16 Agencies Streamline Permit Process
18 Working Together
20 Partners Restore Coastal Sage Scrub Habitat
22 How the Swift Fox Escaped the List
24 A Partnership to Grow Plovers on the Plains
26 Why all the Fuss Over a Frog?
28 Recovery Planning in the 21st Century
31 Restoring the Columbian White-tailed Deer


A New Subspecies Of Cicindela Nevadica Leconte (Coleoptera: Carbidae: Cicindelinae) From The Badlands Of South Dakota, Stephen M. Spomer Jan 2004

A New Subspecies Of Cicindela Nevadica Leconte (Coleoptera: Carbidae: Cicindelinae) From The Badlands Of South Dakota, Stephen M. Spomer

Papers in Entomology

A new subspecies of Cicindela nevadica LeConte, Cicindela nevadica makosika Spomer, is described from the South Dakota Badlands. Geographically, the population occurs at the periphery of the range of C. nevadica knausii Leng. However, this new population is geographically isolated from the nearest C. n. knausii populations, which occur ca. 100 air miles north and over 100 air miles south. Phenotypically, C. n. makosika appears most similar to C. n. tubensis Cazier from northeast Arizona. A possible threat to this population is habitat destruction by cattle.


Record High Wolf, Canis Lupus, Pack Density, L. David Mech, Shawn Tracy Jan 2004

Record High Wolf, Canis Lupus, Pack Density, L. David Mech, Shawn Tracy

USGS Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

This report documents a year-around Wolf (Canis lupus) density of 18.2/100 km2 and a summer density of 30.8/100 km2, in a northeastern Minnesota Wolf pack. The previous record was a summer density of 14.1/100 km2, for a Wolf pack on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.


Unusual Behavior By Bison, Bison Bison, Toward Elk, Cervus Elaphus, And Wolves, Canis Lupus, L. David Mech, Rick T. Mcintyre, Douglas W. Smith Jan 2004

Unusual Behavior By Bison, Bison Bison, Toward Elk, Cervus Elaphus, And Wolves, Canis Lupus, L. David Mech, Rick T. Mcintyre, Douglas W. Smith

USGS Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

Incidents are described of Bison (Bison bison) in Yellowstone National Park mauling and possibly killing a young Elk (Cervus elaphus) calf, chasing wolves (Canis lupus) off Elk they had just killed or were killing, and keeping the wolves away for extended periods. During one of the latter cases, the Bison knocked a wolf-wounded Elk down. Bison were also seen approaching wolves that were resting and sleeping, rousting them, following them to new resting places and repeating this behavior. These behaviors might represent some type of generalized hyper-defensiveness that functions as an anti-predator strategy.