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Articles 1 - 30 of 116

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Occurrence, Abundance And Associations Of Topeka Shiners (Notropis Topeka) In Restored And Unrestored Oxbows In Iowa And Minnesota, Usa, Nicholas T. Simpson, Alexander P. Bybel, Michael J. Weber, Clay L. Pierce, Kevin J. Roe Oct 2019

Occurrence, Abundance And Associations Of Topeka Shiners (Notropis Topeka) In Restored And Unrestored Oxbows In Iowa And Minnesota, Usa, Nicholas T. Simpson, Alexander P. Bybel, Michael J. Weber, Clay L. Pierce, Kevin J. Roe

Natural Resource Ecology and Management Publications

  1. In the USA, the Topeka shiner (Notropis topeka) is a federally listed endangered species that has been in decline for decades. A key reason for the decline is the alteration of naturally flowing streams and associated oxbow habitats resulting from land‐use changes. The focus of recent conservation efforts for Topeka shiners has been the restoration of oxbow habitats by removing sediment from natural oxbows until a groundwater connection is re‐established. This restoration practice has become common in portions of Iowa and south‐west Minnesota.
  2. The goals of this study were to compare the occurrence and abundance of Topeka ...


Thresholds Are In The Eye Of The Beholder: Plants And Wildlife Respond Differently To Short‐Term Cattle Corrals, Kari E. Veblen, Lauren M. Porensky Jul 2019

Thresholds Are In The Eye Of The Beholder: Plants And Wildlife Respond Differently To Short‐Term Cattle Corrals, Kari E. Veblen, Lauren M. Porensky

Wildland Resources Faculty Publications

Rangelands are governed by threshold dynamics, and factors such as drought, wildfire, and herbivory can drive change across thresholds and between ecological states. Most work on this topic has focused on shifts in a single response variable, vegetation, and little research has considered how to reconcile responses of more than one variable to determine whether a system has undergone a genuine state change. In sub‐Saharan Africa, mobile overnight livestock corrals (bomas) can be used by managers to precipitate ecological transitions from areas dominated by bare ground to productive ecosystem hotspots (glades) that are attractive to wild herbivores. We asked ...


Contact Rates With Nesting Birds Before And After Invasive Snake Removal: Estimating The Effects Of Trap-Based Control, Amy A. Yackel Adams, Melia G. Nafus, Page E. Klug, Björn Lardner, M.J. Mazurek, Julie A. Savidge, Robert N. Reed Jul 2019

Contact Rates With Nesting Birds Before And After Invasive Snake Removal: Estimating The Effects Of Trap-Based Control, Amy A. Yackel Adams, Melia G. Nafus, Page E. Klug, Björn Lardner, M.J. Mazurek, Julie A. Savidge, Robert N. Reed

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

Invasive predators are responsible for almost 60% of all vertebrate extinctions worldwide with the most vulnerable faunas occurring on islands. The brown treesnake (Boiga irregularis) is a notorious invasive predator that caused the extirpation or extinction of most native forest birds on Guam. The success of avian reintroduction efforts on Guam will depend on whether snake-control techniques sufficiently reduce contact rates between brown treesnakes and reintroduced birds. Mouse-lure traps can successfully reduce brown treesnake populations at local scales. Over a 22-week period both with and without active snake removal, we evaluated snake-trap contact rates for mouse- and bird-lure traps. Bird-lure ...


Operationalizing Ecological Resilience Concepts For Managing Species And Ecosystems At Risk, Jeanne C. Chambers, Craig R. Allen, Samuel A. Cushman Jul 2019

Operationalizing Ecological Resilience Concepts For Managing Species And Ecosystems At Risk, Jeanne C. Chambers, Craig R. Allen, Samuel A. Cushman

Nebraska Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit -- Staff Publications

This review provides an overview and integration of the use of resilience concepts to guide natural resources management actions. We emphasize ecosystems and landscapes and provide examples of the use of these concepts from empirical research in applied ecology. We begin with a discussion of definitions and concepts of ecological resilience and related terms that are applicable to management. We suggest that a resilience-based framework for management facilitates regional planning by providing the ability to locate management actions where they will have the greatest benefits and determine effective management strategies. We review the six key components of a resilience-based framework ...


Abiotic And Landscape Factors Constrain Restoration Outcomes Across Spatial Scales Of A Widespread Invasive Plant, Christine B. Rohal, Chad R. Cranney, Karin M. Kettenring Apr 2019

Abiotic And Landscape Factors Constrain Restoration Outcomes Across Spatial Scales Of A Widespread Invasive Plant, Christine B. Rohal, Chad R. Cranney, Karin M. Kettenring

Ecology Center Publications

The natural recolonization of native plant communities following invasive species management is notoriously challenging to predict, since outcomes can be contingent on a variety of factors including management decisions, abiotic factors, and landscape setting. The spatial scale at which the treatment is applied can also impact management outcomes, potentially influencing plant assembly processes and treatment success. Understanding the relative importance of each of these factors for plant community assembly can help managers prioritize patches where specific treatments are likely to be most successful. Here, using effects size analyses, we evaluate plant community responses following four invasive Phragmites australis management treatments ...


A Descriptive Study Of Wild Bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Apiformes) And Angiosperms In A Tallgrass Prairie Corridor Of Southeastern Nebraska, Katie Lamke Apr 2019

A Descriptive Study Of Wild Bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Apiformes) And Angiosperms In A Tallgrass Prairie Corridor Of Southeastern Nebraska, Katie Lamke

Dissertations and Student Research in Entomology

The presence of diverse bee communities in an ecosystem is vital for maintaining healthy plant communities, promoting habitat resilience, and supporting sustainable agricultural production and urbanization. Approximately 20,000 known species of bees exist worldwide and assist with the successful reproduction of nearly 80% of Earth’s flowering plants by providing pollination services. In the US, wild bee declines have led to increased monitoring efforts for bees but there remain critical data gaps in prairies of the Great Plains ecoregion. Specific to the Tallgrass prairie where only 1-3% remains in native vegetation, the Nebraska Wildlife Action Plan has identified the ...


Long Reach Lane At Long Marsh, Harpswell, 2018 Post-Project Monitoring Report; Year 5 Of 5, Matthew Craig Mar 2019

Long Reach Lane At Long Marsh, Harpswell, 2018 Post-Project Monitoring Report; Year 5 Of 5, Matthew Craig

Publications

No abstract provided.


Emerging Reservoir Delta‐Backwaters: Biophysical Dynamics And Riparian Biodiversity, Malia A. Volke, W. Carter Johnson, Mark D. Dixon, Michael L. Scott Feb 2019

Emerging Reservoir Delta‐Backwaters: Biophysical Dynamics And Riparian Biodiversity, Malia A. Volke, W. Carter Johnson, Mark D. Dixon, Michael L. Scott

Watershed Sciences Faculty Publications

Deltas and backwater‐affected bottomlands are forming along tributary and mainstem confluences in reservoirs worldwide. Emergence of prograding deltas, along with related upstream hydrogeomorphic changes to river bottomlands in the backwater fluctuation zones of reservoirs, signals the development of new and dynamic riparian and wetland habitats. This study was conducted along the regulated Missouri River, USA, to examine delta‐backwater formation and describe vegetation response to its development and dynamics. Our research focused specifically on the delta‐backwater forming at the confluence of the White River tributary and Lake Francis Case reservoir. Objectives of the research were to: (1) describe ...


Cape Elizabeth Culvert And Habitat Assessment Study, Steve Harding, Jake Aman, Matthew Craig, Robert Malley, Maureen O'Meara Jan 2019

Cape Elizabeth Culvert And Habitat Assessment Study, Steve Harding, Jake Aman, Matthew Craig, Robert Malley, Maureen O'Meara

Publications

Executive Summary:

In early 2017, Jake Aman, representing the Wells National Estuary Research Reserve (WNERR), met with the Cape Elizabeth Public Works Director and Town Planner to talk about culverts. Jake shared aerial photos of culverts located in the Spurwink Marsh where scouring of adjacent habitat areas was evident. He inquired if the town was considering any culvert replacements, in which case WNERR and The Nature Conservancy might be able to partner with the town to promote a habitat sensitive replacement. The outcome of the meeting was a jointly sponsored assessment of major town culverts, including those located in the ...


Riparian Research And Management: Past, Present, Future: Volume 1, Steven W. Carothers, Hisham El Waer, Helen C. Fairley, Deborah M. Finch, Suzanne C. Fouty, Jonathan M. Friedman, Jennifer K. Frey, Stanley V. Gregory, Robert H. Hamre, Annie Henry, Osvel Hinojosa-Huerta, Elaine E. Johnson, R. Roy Johnson, Kenneth J. Kingsley, Mary Anne Mcleod, Eric Mellink, Katie Merewether, Duncan T. Patten, John S. Richardson, Anne Sands, Michael L. Scott, Bo Shelby, Anna A. Sher, D. Max Smith, John T. Stanley, Frederick J. Swanson, Raymond M. Turner, Robert H. Webb, William E. Werner Nov 2018

Riparian Research And Management: Past, Present, Future: Volume 1, Steven W. Carothers, Hisham El Waer, Helen C. Fairley, Deborah M. Finch, Suzanne C. Fouty, Jonathan M. Friedman, Jennifer K. Frey, Stanley V. Gregory, Robert H. Hamre, Annie Henry, Osvel Hinojosa-Huerta, Elaine E. Johnson, R. Roy Johnson, Kenneth J. Kingsley, Mary Anne Mcleod, Eric Mellink, Katie Merewether, Duncan T. Patten, John S. Richardson, Anne Sands, Michael L. Scott, Bo Shelby, Anna A. Sher, D. Max Smith, John T. Stanley, Frederick J. Swanson, Raymond M. Turner, Robert H. Webb, William E. Werner

Watershed Sciences Faculty Publications

Fifty years ago, riparian habitats were not recognized for their extensive and critical contributions to wildlife and the ecosystem function of watersheds. This changed as riparian values were identified and documented, and the science of riparian ecology developed steadily. Papers in this volume range from the more mesic northwestern United States to the arid Southwest and Mexico. More than two dozen authors—most with decades of experience—review the origins of riparian science in the western United States, document what is currently known about riparian ecosystems, and project future needs. Topics are widespread and include: interactions with fire, climate change ...


Modeling How Land Use Legacy Affects The Provision Of Ecosystem Services In Mediterranean Southern Spain, Juan Miguel Requena-Mullor, Cristina Quintas-Soriano, Jodi Brandt, Javier Cabello, Antonio J. Castro Nov 2018

Modeling How Land Use Legacy Affects The Provision Of Ecosystem Services In Mediterranean Southern Spain, Juan Miguel Requena-Mullor, Cristina Quintas-Soriano, Jodi Brandt, Javier Cabello, Antonio J. Castro

Biology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Land use decisions induce legacies that affect the welfare of future generations. Here, we present a spatial modeling approach for quantifying how past land use decisions influence provision of multiple ecosystem services(ESs) based on different land use trajectories. We modeled the effect of past land use changes on water regulation, soil protection and habitat quality in southern Spain, one of the most transformed areas of the Mediterranean region. We demonstrate a measurable influence of antecedent land use changes on the capacity of a given land use to provide ESs, and that the effect size can vary among different services ...


Wetlands Evaluation For Philbrick's Pond Marsh Drainage Evaluation North Hampton, Nh, David M. Burdick, Chris Peter, Gregg Moore May 2018

Wetlands Evaluation For Philbrick's Pond Marsh Drainage Evaluation North Hampton, Nh, David M. Burdick, Chris Peter, Gregg Moore

Natural Resources and the Environment Scholarship

Philbrick’s Pond is a lagoon type estuary that formed landward of barrier beach spits in North Hampton, NH. Its inlet was stabilized and restricted by the road that is now Route 1A or Ocean Boulevard. Water flow from the Gulf of Maine passes through a culvert running under Route 1A and into a small waterway and is further restricted as it runs through a clay pipe under an old trolley berm. The lagoon is characterized as a 29 acre tidal marsh. The goal of the overall project is to evaluate the condition and hydrology of the two restrictions recognizing ...


Floods, Drying, Habitat Connectivity, And Fish Occupancy Dynamics In Restored And Unrestored Oxbows Of West Central Iowa, Usa, Jesse R. Fischer, Bryan D. Bakevich, Colin P. Shea, Clay L. Pierce, Michael C. Quist Apr 2018

Floods, Drying, Habitat Connectivity, And Fish Occupancy Dynamics In Restored And Unrestored Oxbows Of West Central Iowa, Usa, Jesse R. Fischer, Bryan D. Bakevich, Colin P. Shea, Clay L. Pierce, Michael C. Quist

Natural Resource Ecology and Management Publications

1. In the agricultural landscape of the Midwestern USA, waterways are highly altered. Oxbows are among the few remaining off‐channel habitats associated with streams, supporting fish assemblages that include the endangered Topeka shiners Notropis topeka in portions of their remaining range. Oxbow restorations seek to increase the number and quality of oxbows for Topeka shiners. For oxbows to provide optimal habitat, periods of isolation from streams and connection with streams during floods are necessary.

2. Water levels and patterns of drying and hydrological connectivity between 12 oxbows and their neighboring streams in West Central Iowa were continuously monitored from ...


Restoration Of Native-Dominated Plant Communities On A Centaurea Stoebe L.-Infested Site, Neil W. Macdonald, Kaitlyn M. Dykstra, Laurelin M. Martin Apr 2018

Restoration Of Native-Dominated Plant Communities On A Centaurea Stoebe L.-Infested Site, Neil W. Macdonald, Kaitlyn M. Dykstra, Laurelin M. Martin

Funded Articles

Questions: Restoring native-dominated plant communities often requires controlling invasive species, reintroducing native species, and implementing continued management practices. Can single herbicide applications to control Centaurea stoebe L. encourage establishment of seeded native species more effectively than a single mowing? Can annual hand pulling to control C. stoebe favor the persistence of seeded native species? Can mid-spring burning reduce C. stoebe and increase native forbs and grasses? After eight years, will the restored plant communities differ from those in untreated areas?

Location: Bass River Recreation Area, Ottawa County, MI, USA.

Methods: We studied the effects of site preparation (mowing, clopyralid, glyphosate ...


Outplanting Technique, Host Genotype, And Site Affect The Initial Success Of Outplanted Acropora Cervicornis, Elizabeth Goergen, David S. Gilliam Feb 2018

Outplanting Technique, Host Genotype, And Site Affect The Initial Success Of Outplanted Acropora Cervicornis, Elizabeth Goergen, David S. Gilliam

Marine & Environmental Sciences Faculty Articles

Acropora cervicornis is the most widely used coral species for reef restoration in the greater Caribbean. However, outplanting methodologies (e.g., colony density, size, host genotype, and attachment technique) vary greatly, and to date have not been evaluated for optimality across multiple sites. Two experiments were completed during this study, the first evaluated the effects of attachment technique, colony size, and genotype by outplanting 405 A. cervicornis colonies, from ten genotypes, four size classes, and three attachment techniques (epoxy, nail and cable tie, or puck) across three sites. Colony survival, health condition, tissue productivity, and growth were assessed across one ...


Making Rewilding Fit For Policy, Nathalie Pettorelli, Jos Barlow, Philip A. Stephens, Sarah M. Durant, Ben Connor, Henrike Schulte To Bühne, Christopher J. Sandom, Jonathan Wentworth, Johan T. Du Toit Jan 2018

Making Rewilding Fit For Policy, Nathalie Pettorelli, Jos Barlow, Philip A. Stephens, Sarah M. Durant, Ben Connor, Henrike Schulte To Bühne, Christopher J. Sandom, Jonathan Wentworth, Johan T. Du Toit

Wildland Resources Faculty Publications

  1. Rewilding, here defined as “the reorganisation of biota and ecosystem processes to set an identified social–ecological system on a preferred trajectory, leading to the self‐sustaining provision of ecosystem services with minimal ongoing management,” is increasingly considered as an environmental management option, with potential for enhancing both biodiversity and ecosystem services.
  2. Despite burgeoning interest in the concept, there are uncertainties and difficulties associated with the practical implementation of rewilding projects, while the evidence available for facilitating sound decision‐making for rewilding initiatives remains elusive.
  3. We identify five key research areas to inform the implementation of future rewilding initiatives: increased ...


Understanding Soil Moisture Levels On Soledad Ridge, Santa Rosa Island, California During The Summer Months, Dulce M. Lopez, Stephen Bednar, Kathryn Mceachern Jan 2018

Understanding Soil Moisture Levels On Soledad Ridge, Santa Rosa Island, California During The Summer Months, Dulce M. Lopez, Stephen Bednar, Kathryn Mceachern

STAR (STEM Teacher and Researcher) Presentations

Santa Rosa Island located off the coast of Santa Barbara County was grazed by non-native ungulates leaving the island stripped of vegetation topsoil layer. With the removal of ungulates, the National Park Service began restoring the Cloud Forest on Soledad Ridge. Soledad Ridge is said to have once been covered by large stands of island oaks (Quercus tometella) and other endemic and native plants. The unique leaf and structural morphology of such vegetation collects water from wind derived fog which serves as the main source of water for this unique ecosystem. In an effort to jump-start ecosystem vegetation recovery, a ...


Great Basin Forb Restoration: Lupine Response To Altered Precipitation Predicted By Climate Change, Andrea Jo Johnson, Kristin Hulvey, Scott Jensen, Tom Monaco Jan 2018

Great Basin Forb Restoration: Lupine Response To Altered Precipitation Predicted By Climate Change, Andrea Jo Johnson, Kristin Hulvey, Scott Jensen, Tom Monaco

Research on Capitol Hill

Abundance of native forb species is declining, leading to degraded ecosystems within the Great Basin.

Forbs provide many ecosystem functions, including wildlife habitat for species such as Sage Grouse, increased biodiversity, resistance to erosion, and protection from invasive plant species.

Climate change is predicted to affect timing, frequency, and intensity of precipitation within the Great Basin. During the fall season, precipitation is expected to increase by 30%.

Changes in precipitation will likely affect fall emergence of forbs, which is essential for overwintering and establishment.

Learning how precipitation affects forb emergence could lead to new methods that increase fall emergence and ...


2018 Update Mtg: Restoration Of Retired Cranberry Bogs, Casey Kennedy Jan 2018

2018 Update Mtg: Restoration Of Retired Cranberry Bogs, Casey Kennedy

Cranberry Station Extension meetings

No abstract provided.


Annual Report 2018, Casco Bay Estuary Partnership Jan 2018

Annual Report 2018, Casco Bay Estuary Partnership

Publications

CBEP has been collaborating for over 25 years with a multitude of partners working hard to protect Casco Bay. 2018 brought us new and exciting collaborations.

The Casco Bay Nutrient Council, convened by CBEP, met for almost two years and produced a report that laid a path forward for all partners to tackle nutrient pollution.

CBEP worked closely with the EPA to establish the Casco Bay Monitoring Network, made up of over 20 member organizations, aimed at coordinating and upgrading monitoring in the Bay. The Network is currently updating the Casco Bay Monitoring Plan.

CBEP is an active participant in ...


Abscisic Acid Seed Coating Delay Data, William Richardson Jan 2018

Abscisic Acid Seed Coating Delay Data, William Richardson

ScholarsArchive Data

This data is from a study which determined the effect different application rates of abscisic acid have on the total germinability and germination time of seeds. Germination count data, calculated germination indices, and field germination predictions are all included within the data set.


Site Factors Influence On Herbaceous Understory Diversity In East Texas Pinus Palustris Savannas, Brooke Mccalip, Brian Oswald, Kathryn R. Kidd, Yuhi Weng, Kenneth Farrish Phd Jan 2018

Site Factors Influence On Herbaceous Understory Diversity In East Texas Pinus Palustris Savannas, Brooke Mccalip, Brian Oswald, Kathryn R. Kidd, Yuhi Weng, Kenneth Farrish Phd

Faculty Publications

Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas were once dominant across the southeastern U.S., including East Texas and parts of western and central Louisiana. The diverse understory associated with these historical savannas may occasionally be seen today, but not often in longleaf pine ecosystems. This project aimed to define east Texas site characteristics that are necessary to support these ecosystems with a dense and diverse herbaceous understory with little to no midstory cover. Fifty-nine plots across three study sites were established to evaluate the influence of overstory cover, basal area, aspect, elevation, and slope on the number of plant genera present ...


Identifying Critical Recruitment Bottlenecks Limiting Seedling Establishment In A Degraded Seagrass Ecosystem, J Statton, Lr Montoya, Rj Orth, Kw Dixon, Ga Kendrick Nov 2017

Identifying Critical Recruitment Bottlenecks Limiting Seedling Establishment In A Degraded Seagrass Ecosystem, J Statton, Lr Montoya, Rj Orth, Kw Dixon, Ga Kendrick

VIMS Articles

Identifying early life-stage transitions limiting seagrass recruitment could improve our ability to target demographic processes most responsive to management. Here we determine the magnitude of life-stage transitions along gradients in physical disturbance limiting seedling establishment for the marine angiosperm, Posidonia australis. Transition matrix models and sensitivity analyses were used to identify which transitions were critical for successful seedling establishment during the first year of seed recruitment and projection models were used to predict the most appropriate environments and seeding densities. Total survival probability of seedlings was low (0.001), however, transition probabilities between life-stages differed across the environmental gradients; seedling ...


Effectiveness Of Cattail (Typha Spp.) Management Techniques Depends On Exogenous Nitrogen Inputs, Kenneth J. Elgersma, Jason P. Martina, Deborah E. Goldberg, William S. Currie May 2017

Effectiveness Of Cattail (Typha Spp.) Management Techniques Depends On Exogenous Nitrogen Inputs, Kenneth J. Elgersma, Jason P. Martina, Deborah E. Goldberg, William S. Currie

Faculty Publications

Wetlands occupy a position in the landscape that makes them vulnerable to the effects of current land use and the legacies of past land use. Many wetlands in agricultural regions like the North American Midwest are strongly affected by elevated nutrient inputs as well as high rates of invasion by the hybrid cattail Typha × glauca. These two stressors also exacerbate each other: increased nutrients increase invasion success, and invasions increase nutrient retention and nutrient loads in the wetland. This interaction could create a positive feedback that would inhibit efforts to manage and control invasions, but little is known about the ...


Cattail Management Scenario Simulations Using Mondrian, Kenneth J. Elgersma, Jason P. Martina, Deborah E. Goldberg, William S. Currie Jan 2017

Cattail Management Scenario Simulations Using Mondrian, Kenneth J. Elgersma, Jason P. Martina, Deborah E. Goldberg, William S. Currie

Data Sets

A set of computer simulations using the Mondrian model (ver 3.8) to simulate different approaches for control of invasive cattails.


Effects Of Habitat Restoration On Soil Retention On Santa Rosa Island, Michael Perez, Kathryn Mceachern, Ken Niessen Jan 2017

Effects Of Habitat Restoration On Soil Retention On Santa Rosa Island, Michael Perez, Kathryn Mceachern, Ken Niessen

STAR (STEM Teacher and Researcher) Presentations

Ranching began on Santa Rosa Island in the 1840’s, consequently introducing nonnative megafauna that put novel selective grazing pressures on endemic plant species. Their movement patterns also altered substrate integrity as the land became denuded of any stabilizing vegetation. Dense groves of island oak (Q. tomentella) are known to aid in sediment deposition and retention. The groves also function to collect water during periods of intense fog common to the island. This experiment sought to determine whether sediment is being lost or deposited on a ridge in the middle of the island containing a grove of Q. tomentella. The ...


Perspectives On The Controlled Propagation, Augmentation, And Reintroduction Of Freshwater Mussels (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionoida), Stephen E. Mcmurray, Kevin J. Roe Jan 2017

Perspectives On The Controlled Propagation, Augmentation, And Reintroduction Of Freshwater Mussels (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionoida), Stephen E. Mcmurray, Kevin J. Roe

Natural Resource Ecology and Management Publications

Controlled propagation, augmentation, and reintroduction (PAR) of rare and endangered aquatic organisms has become a priority action for recovery and delisting, and in many cases is an action of ‘‘last resort’’ to either restore or maintain existing populations. The guiding principle of PAR efforts should be to avoid harming existing populations of congeneric or nontarget species and also minimize risks to extant populations and habitats. Controlled PAR of freshwater mussels should not be a long-term management strategy conducted in perpetuity and should not be used as a substitute for recovery tasks such as habitat restoration or addressing the causes of ...


Vegetation Response To Canopy Disturbance And Season Of Burn During Oak Woodland And Savanna Restoration In Tennessee, Andrew Lee Vander Yacht, Seth A. Barrioz, Patrick D. Keyser, Craig A. Harper, David Buckley, David A. Buehler, Roger D. Applegate Nov 2016

Vegetation Response To Canopy Disturbance And Season Of Burn During Oak Woodland And Savanna Restoration In Tennessee, Andrew Lee Vander Yacht, Seth A. Barrioz, Patrick D. Keyser, Craig A. Harper, David Buckley, David A. Buehler, Roger D. Applegate

UT Extension publication

The removal of fire’s influence on plant community succession has resulted in the near disappearance of oak woodlands and savannas from the Appalachian region. Negative trends in associated plant and wildlife species could be reversed if these communities are restored, but management has been limited by inadequate canopy disturbance, resprouting of woody plants, and a lack of empirical research. To address these issues, we evaluated herbaceous and woody vegetation response on the

Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee to 5 replicated treatments involving canopy reduction and fire-season combinations and unmanaged controls. All categories of woody vegetation except large saplings density, but ...


Soil Moisture On Soledad Ridge In Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, Carrie Fong, Kathryn Mceachern, Ken Niessen Oct 2016

Soil Moisture On Soledad Ridge In Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, Carrie Fong, Kathryn Mceachern, Ken Niessen

STAR (STEM Teacher and Researcher) Presentations

Santa Rosa Island is one of the Channel Islands off the coast of southern California. Before the island was heavily grazed, Santa Rosa Island is thought to have had large stands of island oak trees, Quercus tomentella, that provided a critical source of water for the ecosystem by creating a “cloud forest”. Wind-borne fog collects on the leaves, branches, and twigs of the island oaks and other native shrubs. Once the water condenses it drips, falls, and soaks into the soil. Introducing cattle and especially sheep to the island has damaged the ecosystem and nearly decimated Santa Rosa Island of ...


Impacts Of Fog Drip On Survivorship And Growth Of Native Herb And Shrub Seedlings On Santa Rosa Island, Julianne Bradbury, Ken Niessen, Kathryn Mceachern Sep 2016

Impacts Of Fog Drip On Survivorship And Growth Of Native Herb And Shrub Seedlings On Santa Rosa Island, Julianne Bradbury, Ken Niessen, Kathryn Mceachern

STAR (STEM Teacher and Researcher) Presentations

Overgrazing on Santa Rosa Island led to loss of topsoil in ridgeline groves of endemic island oaks (Quercus tomentella). Restoration specialists attempting to mitigate the impacts of wind and water erosion must determine efficient methods of reestablishing native vegetation. Planting pillows, burlap sacks filled with planting mix and attached to the bedrock substrate, may nurture seedlings long enough for their roots to penetrate the underlying sandstone. Since the island’s ridgeline habitat is often inaccessible during the rainy season, restoration efforts are largely confined to the dry summer months, during which condensed fog is an important source of moisture for ...