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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

The Changing Role Of Rodenticides And Their Alternatives In The Management Of Commensal Rodents, Gary Witmer Oct 2019

The Changing Role Of Rodenticides And Their Alternatives In The Management Of Commensal Rodents, Gary Witmer

USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications

Rodents cause substantial damage and losses of foodstuffs around the world. They also transmit many diseases to humans and livestock. While various methods are used to reduce damage caused by rodents, rodenticides remain an important tool in the toolbox. However, like all tools, rodenticides have advantages and disadvantages. Several considerations are shaping the future of rodenticide use, including manufacturing and registration costs, concern about toxicity levels and nontarget animal hazards, potential hazards to children, reduced effectiveness of some formulations, and humaneness to the targeted rodents. Many of these disadvantages apply to anticoagulant rodenticides, and their use is being more restricted ...


Mississippi Sandhill Crane Conservation Update 2014-2016, Scott G. Hereford, Angela J. Dedrickson Jan 2018

Mississippi Sandhill Crane Conservation Update 2014-2016, Scott G. Hereford, Angela J. Dedrickson

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

To manage crane habitat during 2014-2016, 5,826 ha were treated with prescribed burns, 298 ha of woody vegetation were removed, 94 ha of invasive plants were chemically treated, and 8 ha of crops were planted. There were 247 predators removed. We acclimated and released 29 captive-reared juveniles. We began testing drones (unmanned aerial systems [UAS]), to locate nests. We detected an average of 34 nests per year with 6 fledglings each year. The December 2016 population was 129 cranes, up 9% from the previous 3 years.


Quality Over Quantity: Buffer Strips Can Be Improved With Select Native Plant Species, Kelly Ann Gill, R. Cox, Matthew E. O'Neal Apr 2014

Quality Over Quantity: Buffer Strips Can Be Improved With Select Native Plant Species, Kelly Ann Gill, R. Cox, Matthew E. O'Neal

Entomology Publications

Native plants attractive to beneficial insects may improve the value of buffer strips by increasing biodiversity and enhancing the delivery of insect-derived ecosystem services. In a 2-yr field experiment, we measured the response of insect communities across nine buffers that varied in plant diversity. We constructed buffers with plants commonly found in buffers of USDA-certified organic farms in Iowa (typically a single species), recommended for prairie reconstruction, or recommended for attracting beneficial insects. We hypothesized that the diversity and abundance of beneficial insects will be 1) greatest in buffers composed of diverse plant communities with continuous availability of floral resources ...


Patch Burn‐Grazing: An Annotated Bibliography, Rajeeva Voleti, Stephen L. Winter, Sherry Leis Jan 2014

Patch Burn‐Grazing: An Annotated Bibliography, Rajeeva Voleti, Stephen L. Winter, Sherry Leis

Papers in Natural Resources

Patch burn‐grazing is a rangeland management strategy that exploits the attraction of grazing animals to recently burned areas in order to achieve management objectives. When fiire is applied to a landscape in a patchy manner, leaving some patches unburned, the resulting grazing animal activity, forage utilization, and animal impact are patchily distributed within that landscape as well. Areas that have been recently burned tend to be characterized by the highest levels of grazing animal activity while areas that have gone the longest without burning tend to be characterized by the lowest levels of grazing animal activity. This can be ...


Inconsistent Outcomes Of Heterogeneity-Based Management Underscore Importance Of Matching Evaluation To Conservation Objectives, Devan Allen Mcgranahan, David M. Engle, Samuel D. Fuhlendorf, Stephen L. Winter, James R. Miller, Diane M. Debinski Aug 2013

Inconsistent Outcomes Of Heterogeneity-Based Management Underscore Importance Of Matching Evaluation To Conservation Objectives, Devan Allen Mcgranahan, David M. Engle, Samuel D. Fuhlendorf, Stephen L. Winter, James R. Miller, Diane M. Debinski

Papers in Natural Resources

Conservation policy often incentivizes managers of human-impacted areas to create landscape heterogeneity to maximize biodiversity. In rangeland, patchy disturbance regimes create landscape heterogeneity (patch contrast), but outcomes of heterogeneity-based management are rarely tested for a universal response. We analyzed four habitat variables—vegetation structure, plant functional group composition, litter cover, and bare ground—from five experimental rangelands in Oklahoma and Iowa, USA. We tested for response consistency to heterogeneity-based management across and within locations. We calculated effect sizes for each variable to compare patch contrast on pastures managed for heterogeneity (patch burn-grazing) and pastures managed for homogeneity (grazing with homogeneous ...


Wetland Management Guidelines For Nebraska's Wildlife Management Areas, Ted Lagrange, Randy Stutheit Apr 2011

Wetland Management Guidelines For Nebraska's Wildlife Management Areas, Ted Lagrange, Randy Stutheit

Nebraska Game and Parks Commission -- White Papers, Conference Presentations, & Manuscripts

Prior to Euro-American settlement, wetlands covered about 6% of the Nebraska landscape. Since settlement, the state’s wetlands have suffered serious decline. For example, approximately 90% of Rainwater Basin playa wetlands and 90% of the eastern saline wetlands have been destroyed or are highly degraded. Remaining wetlands are threatened by conversion to other uses (e.g. agriculture), invasive and aggressive vegetation, siltation, and lack of proper management. Only through sound management can the wetlands on our Wildlife Management Areas (WMA) be preserved for the citizens of Nebraska, as well as the native plants and wildlife dependent on them.

This section ...


Management Of Lands Along The Platte River Fromelmcreek To Lexington, Nebraska, As Crane Habitat, James J. Jenniges, Mark M. Peyton Jan 2008

Management Of Lands Along The Platte River Fromelmcreek To Lexington, Nebraska, As Crane Habitat, James J. Jenniges, Mark M. Peyton

Proceedings of the North American Crane Workshop

To meet Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) license requirements for the operation of 5 hydroelectric power plants on the North Platte and Platte Rivers in Nebraska, the Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD) and The Central Nebraska Public Power and Irrigation District (Central) together have become the second largest owners and managers of lands for the conservation of endangered species and migratory waterbirds along the central reach of the Platte River. We describe here the management activities on the properties, success of the management in achieving objectives, and the response of sandhill (Grus canadensis) and whooping cranes (G. americana) to that ...


The Endangered Species: The Urban Water Utility Perspective, Chips Barry Jun 1996

The Endangered Species: The Urban Water Utility Perspective, Chips Barry

Biodiversity Protection: Implementation and Reform of the Endangered Species Act (Summer Conference, June 9-12)

24 pages.