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Selected Works

2015

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

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Articles 1 - 30 of 138

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Using Gis Mapping Of The Extent Of Nearshore Rocky Reefs To Estimate The Abundance And Reproductive Output Of Important Fishery Species, Jeremy Claisse, Daniel Pondella, Jonathan Williams, James Sadd Dec 2015

Using Gis Mapping Of The Extent Of Nearshore Rocky Reefs To Estimate The Abundance And Reproductive Output Of Important Fishery Species, Jeremy Claisse, Daniel Pondella, Jonathan Williams, James Sadd

James Sadd

Kelp Bass (Paralabrax clathratus) and California Sheephead (Semicossyphus pulcher) are economically and ecologically valuable rocky reef fishes in southern California, making them likely indicator species for evaluating resource management actions. Multiple spatial datasets, aerial and satellite photography, underwater observations and expert judgment were used to produce a comprehensive map of nearshore natural rocky reef habitat for the Santa Monica Bay region (California, USA). It was then used to examine the relative contribution of individual reefs to a regional estimate of abundance and reproductive potential of the focal species. For the reefs surveyed for fishes (i.e. 18 out of the ...


Elevated Co2 Induced Changes In The Chemistry Of Quaking Aspen (Populus Tremuloides Michaux) Leaf Litter: Subsequent Mass Loss And Microbial Response In A Stream Ecosystem, Steven Rier, Nancy Tuchman, Robert Wetzel, James Teeri Dec 2015

Elevated Co2 Induced Changes In The Chemistry Of Quaking Aspen (Populus Tremuloides Michaux) Leaf Litter: Subsequent Mass Loss And Microbial Response In A Stream Ecosystem, Steven Rier, Nancy Tuchman, Robert Wetzel, James Teeri

Nancy Tuchman

No abstract provided.


An Annotated Bibliography Of References To Historical Distributions Of Pronghorn In Southern And Baja California, David Brown, Jorge Cancino, Kevin Clark, Myrna Smith, Jim Yoakum Dec 2015

An Annotated Bibliography Of References To Historical Distributions Of Pronghorn In Southern And Baja California, David Brown, Jorge Cancino, Kevin Clark, Myrna Smith, Jim Yoakum

David C. Brown

Recent pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) translocations to southern California and the establishment of captive populations of endangered desert pronghorn have revived interest in the historical occurrence of pronghorn in the Californias. Adding to this interest is the recent widespread replacement of coastal sage scrub vegetation in southern California by annual grasslands more favorable to pronghorn. We have searched the scientific and popular literature, as well as museum collections, to locate pronghorn antelope occurrences from below San Francisco Bay southward through the Baja California peninsula. Our results show that pronghorn were widely distributed, and often abundant, on nearly all of the plains ...


Advancing Synthetic Ecology: Database System To Facilitate Complex Ecological Meta-Analyses, V. Bala Chaudhary Dec 2015

Advancing Synthetic Ecology: Database System To Facilitate Complex Ecological Meta-Analyses, V. Bala Chaudhary

V. Bala Chaudhary

No abstract provided.


Untangling The Biological Contributions To Soil Stability In Semiarid Shrublands, V. Bala Chaudhary, Matthew Bowker, Thomas O'Dell, James Grace, Andrea Redman, Mathias Rillig, Nancy Johnson Dec 2015

Untangling The Biological Contributions To Soil Stability In Semiarid Shrublands, V. Bala Chaudhary, Matthew Bowker, Thomas O'Dell, James Grace, Andrea Redman, Mathias Rillig, Nancy Johnson

V. Bala Chaudhary

Communities of plants, biological soil crusts (BSCs), and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are known to influence soil stability individually, but their relative contributions, interactions, and combined effects are not well understood, particularly in arid and semiarid ecosystems. In a landscape-scale field study we quantified plant, BSC, and AM fungal communities at 216 locations along a gradient of soil stability levels in southern Utah, USA. We used multivariate modeling to examine the relative influences of plants, BSCs, and AM fungi on surface and subsurface stability in a semiarid shrubland landscape. Models were found to be congruent with the data and explained ...


Mysterious Mycorrhizae? A Field Trip And Classroom Experiment To Demystify The Symbioses Formed Between Plants And Fungi, Nancy Johnson, V. Bala Chaudhary, Jason Hoeksema, John Moore, Anne Pringle Dec 2015

Mysterious Mycorrhizae? A Field Trip And Classroom Experiment To Demystify The Symbioses Formed Between Plants And Fungi, Nancy Johnson, V. Bala Chaudhary, Jason Hoeksema, John Moore, Anne Pringle

V. Bala Chaudhary

No abstract provided.


Nonnative Phragmites Australis Invasion Into Utah Wetlands, Andrew Kulmatiski, Karen H. Beard, Laura A. Meyerson, Jacob R. Gibson, Karen E. Mock Dec 2015

Nonnative Phragmites Australis Invasion Into Utah Wetlands, Andrew Kulmatiski, Karen H. Beard, Laura A. Meyerson, Jacob R. Gibson, Karen E. Mock

Laura A. Meyerson

Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. (common reed), already one of the world’s most widespread plant species, has realized rapid range expansion in coastal wetlands of North America in the past century, but little is known about P. australis range expansion in inland wetland systems. We used genetic analyses, aerial photographs, field surveys, and a greenhouse experiment to study the extent and mechanism of nonnative P. australis invasion of Utah wetlands. We collected and genetically analyzed 39 herbarium samples across the state and 225 present-day samples from northern Utah’s major wetland complexes. All samples collected before 1993 and ...


Nonnative Phragmites Australis Invasion Into Utah Wetlands, Andrew Kulmatiski, Karen H. Beard, Laura A. Meyerson, Jacob R. Gibson, Karen E. Mock Dec 2015

Nonnative Phragmites Australis Invasion Into Utah Wetlands, Andrew Kulmatiski, Karen H. Beard, Laura A. Meyerson, Jacob R. Gibson, Karen E. Mock

Laura A. Meyerson

Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. (common reed), already one of the world’s most widespread plant species, has realized rapid range expansion in coastal wetlands of North America in the past century, but little is known about P. australis range expansion in inland wetland systems. We used genetic analyses, aerial photographs, field surveys, and a greenhouse experiment to study the extent and mechanism of nonnative P. australis invasion of Utah wetlands. We collected and genetically analyzed 39 herbarium samples across the state and 225 present-day samples from northern Utah’s major wetland complexes. All samples collected before 1993 and ...


Why Are You A Biologist?: Role Of Societies (Tri-Beta) In Professional Development, Emily F. Schmitt Lavin Nov 2015

Why Are You A Biologist?: Role Of Societies (Tri-Beta) In Professional Development, Emily F. Schmitt Lavin

Emily F Schmitt Lavin

No abstract provided.


Environmental Temperatures, Artificial Nests, And Incubation Of Cassin's Auklet, Emma C. Kelsey, Russell W. Bradley, Pete Warzybok, Jamie Jahncke, Scott A. Shaffer Nov 2015

Environmental Temperatures, Artificial Nests, And Incubation Of Cassin's Auklet, Emma C. Kelsey, Russell W. Bradley, Pete Warzybok, Jamie Jahncke, Scott A. Shaffer

Scott A. Shaffer

Hatching success in birds is influenced by the temperature and turning rate of the egg, but our understanding of the environmental factors that effect incubation temperatures and egg turning rates in birds is limited. Especially little is known of these effects for species that nest in burrows or crevices, such as the Cassin's auklet (Ptychoramphus aleuticus). On Southeast Farallon Island, California, USA, a subset of the Cassin's auklet (hereafter auklet) population nest in artificial nest boxes. The nest boxes are above ground and made out of a single layer of plywood. Temperatures in unshaded nest boxes can increase ...


Wildlife In U.S. Cities: Managing Unwanted Animals, John Hadidian Nov 2015

Wildlife In U.S. Cities: Managing Unwanted Animals, John Hadidian

John Hadidian, PhD

Conflicts between people and wild animals in cities are undoubtedly as old as urban living itself. In the United States it is only of late, however, that many of the species now found in cities have come to live there. The increasing kind and number of human-wildlife conflicts in urbanizing environments makes it a priority that effective and humane means of conflict resolution be found. The urban public wants conflicts with wildlife resolved humanely, but needs to know what the alternative management approaches are, and what ethical standards should guide their use. This paper examines contemporary urban wildlife control in ...


Body Size Affects Individual Winter Foraging Strategies Of Thick-Billed Murres In The Bering Sea, Rachael A. Orben, Rosana Paredes, Daniel D. Roby, David B. Irons, Scott A. Shaffer Oct 2015

Body Size Affects Individual Winter Foraging Strategies Of Thick-Billed Murres In The Bering Sea, Rachael A. Orben, Rosana Paredes, Daniel D. Roby, David B. Irons, Scott A. Shaffer

Scott A. Shaffer

  1. Foraging and migration often require different energetic and movement strategies. Though not readily apparent, constraints during one phase might influence the foraging strategies observed in another. For marine birds that fly and dive, body size constraints likely present a trade-off between foraging ability and migration as smaller bodies reduce flight costs, whereas larger bodies are advantageous for diving deeper.
  2. This study examines individual wintering strategies of deep diving thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) breeding at three colonies in the south-eastern Bering Sea: St Paul, St George and Bogoslof. These colonies, arranged north to south, are located such that breeding birds forage ...


Ecosystems Of The Chester, Ridley, And Crum Watersheds – Life Sustaining Life, Walter Cressler Oct 2015

Ecosystems Of The Chester, Ridley, And Crum Watersheds – Life Sustaining Life, Walter Cressler

Walt Cressler

No abstract provided.


Isotopic Discrimination In The Double-Crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax Auritus), Elizabeth C. Craig, Brian S. Dorr, Katie C. Hanson-Dorr, Jed P. Sparks, Paul D. Curtis Oct 2015

Isotopic Discrimination In The Double-Crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax Auritus), Elizabeth C. Craig, Brian S. Dorr, Katie C. Hanson-Dorr, Jed P. Sparks, Paul D. Curtis

Brian S Dorr

The diet-tissue discrimination factor is the amount by which a consumer’s tissue varies isotopically from its diet, and is therefore a key element in models that use stable isotopes to estimate diet composition. In this study we measured discrimination factors in blood (whole blood, red blood cells and plasma), liver, muscle and feathers of Double- crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) for stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur. Cormorants exhibited discrimination factors that differed significantly among tissue types (for carbon and nitrogen), and differed substantially (in the context of the isotopic variation among relevant prey species) from those observed ...


Is Your Learning Style Paranoid?, Kirby Farrell Sep 2015

Is Your Learning Style Paranoid?, Kirby Farrell

kirby farrell

We learn—and grow—by engaging with anomalies: new things that don't fit our familiar categories. It's a gut process, not just a philosophical choice. Anxiety can make us paranoid about what's new and strange. Knowing that can spur fascination and help us to adapt.


Century-Scale Patterns And Trends Of Global Pyrogenic Carbon Emissions And Fire Influences On Terrestrial Carbon Balance, Jia Yang, Hanqin Tian, Bo Tao, Wei Ren, Chaoqun (Crystal) Lu, Shufen Pan, Yuhang Wang, Yongqiang Liu Sep 2015

Century-Scale Patterns And Trends Of Global Pyrogenic Carbon Emissions And Fire Influences On Terrestrial Carbon Balance, Jia Yang, Hanqin Tian, Bo Tao, Wei Ren, Chaoqun (Crystal) Lu, Shufen Pan, Yuhang Wang, Yongqiang Liu

Chaoqun (Crystal) Lu

Fires have consumed a large amount of terrestrial organic carbon and significantly influenced terrestrial ecosystems and the physical climate system over the past century. Although biomass burning has been widely investigated at a global level in recent decades via satellite observations, less work has been conducted to examine the century-scale changes in global fire regimes and fire influences on the terrestrial carbon balance. In this study, we investigated global pyrogenic carbon emissions and fire influences on the terrestrial carbon fluxes from 1901 to 2010 by using a process-based land ecosystem model. Our results show a significant declining trend in global ...


Disentangling Climatic And Anthropogenic Controls On Global Terrestrial Evapotranspiration Trends, Jiafu Mao, Wenting Fu, Xiaoying Shi, Daniel M. Ricciuto, Joshua B. Fisher, Robert E. Dickinson, Yaxing Wei, Willis Shem, Shilong Piao, Kaicun Wang, Christopher R. Schwalm, Hanqin Tian, Mingquan Mu, Altaf Arain, Philippe Ciais, Robert Cook, Yongdiu Dai, Daniel Hayes, Forrest M. Hoffman, Maoyi Huang, Suo Huang, Deborah N. Huntzinger, Akihiko Ito, Atul Jain, Anthony W. King, Huimin Lei, Chaoqun (Crystal) Lu, Huimin Lei, Anna M. Michalak, Changhui Peng, Shushi Peng, Benjamin Poulter, Kevin Schaefer, Elshin Jafarov, Peter E. Thornton, Weile Wang, Ning Zeng, Zhenzhong Zeng, Fang Zhao, Qiuan Zhu, Zaichun Zhu Sep 2015

Disentangling Climatic And Anthropogenic Controls On Global Terrestrial Evapotranspiration Trends, Jiafu Mao, Wenting Fu, Xiaoying Shi, Daniel M. Ricciuto, Joshua B. Fisher, Robert E. Dickinson, Yaxing Wei, Willis Shem, Shilong Piao, Kaicun Wang, Christopher R. Schwalm, Hanqin Tian, Mingquan Mu, Altaf Arain, Philippe Ciais, Robert Cook, Yongdiu Dai, Daniel Hayes, Forrest M. Hoffman, Maoyi Huang, Suo Huang, Deborah N. Huntzinger, Akihiko Ito, Atul Jain, Anthony W. King, Huimin Lei, Chaoqun (Crystal) Lu, Huimin Lei, Anna M. Michalak, Changhui Peng, Shushi Peng, Benjamin Poulter, Kevin Schaefer, Elshin Jafarov, Peter E. Thornton, Weile Wang, Ning Zeng, Zhenzhong Zeng, Fang Zhao, Qiuan Zhu, Zaichun Zhu

Chaoqun (Crystal) Lu

We examined natural and anthropogenic controls on terrestrial evapotranspiration (ET) changes from 1982 to 2010 using multiple estimates from remote sensing-based datasets and process-oriented land surface models.A significant increasing trend of ET in each hemisphere was consistently revealed by observationally-constrained data and multi-model ensembles that considered historic natural and anthropogenic drivers. The climate impacts were simulated to determine the spatiotemporal variations in ET. Globally, risingCO2 ranked second in these models after the predominant climatic influences, and yielded decreasing trends in canopy transpiration and ET, especially for tropical forests and high-latitude shrub land. Increasing nitrogen deposition slightly amplified global ET ...


Climate Extremes Dominating Seasonal And Interannual Variations In Carbon Export From The Mississippi River Basin, Hanqin Tian, Wei Ren, Jia Yang, Bo Tao, Wei-Jun Cai, Steve E. Lohrenz, Charles S. Hopkinson, Mingliang Liu, Qichun Yang, Chaoqun (Crystal) Lu, Bowen Zhang, Kamaljit Banger, Shufen Pan, Ruoying He, Zuo Xue Sep 2015

Climate Extremes Dominating Seasonal And Interannual Variations In Carbon Export From The Mississippi River Basin, Hanqin Tian, Wei Ren, Jia Yang, Bo Tao, Wei-Jun Cai, Steve E. Lohrenz, Charles S. Hopkinson, Mingliang Liu, Qichun Yang, Chaoqun (Crystal) Lu, Bowen Zhang, Kamaljit Banger, Shufen Pan, Ruoying He, Zuo Xue

Chaoqun (Crystal) Lu

Knowledge about the annual and seasonal patterns of organic and inorganic carbon (C) exports from the major rivers of the world to the coastal ocean is essential for our understanding and potential management of the global C budget so as to limit anthropogenic modification of global climate. Unfortunately our predictive understanding of what controls the timing, magnitude, and quality of C export is still rudimentary. Here we use a process-based coupled hydrologic/ecosystem biogeochemistry model (the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model) to examine how climate variability and extreme events, changing land use, and atmospheric chemistry have affected the annual and seasonal ...


A Re-Assessment Of Priority Amphibian Species Of Peru, Edgar Lehr, Laurence Jarvis, Ariadne Angulo, Alessandro Catenazzi, Rudolf Von May, Jason Brown, James Lewis Aug 2015

A Re-Assessment Of Priority Amphibian Species Of Peru, Edgar Lehr, Laurence Jarvis, Ariadne Angulo, Alessandro Catenazzi, Rudolf Von May, Jason Brown, James Lewis

Edgar Lehr

Peru supports approximately 588 amphibian species, of which 492 have been assessed on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Of these, 111 are classified as Threatened, with 69 species classified as Critically Endangered or Endangered. In addition, 140 amphibian species remain Data Deficient. We re-assessed the conservation status of 38 amphibian species originally identified as potentially Threatened by von May et al. (2008), using the IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria. Fourteen species assessments changed as a result of re-assessment, of which eight changed from Data Deficient to Threatened; two changed from Data Deficient to Near Threatened and Least ...


The Shellfish Corner: Filter Feeding Bivalves As Processors Of Coastal Waters, Michael Rice Aug 2015

The Shellfish Corner: Filter Feeding Bivalves As Processors Of Coastal Waters, Michael Rice

Michael A Rice

Bivalves have a profound role in controlling the boom and bust cycles of seasonal phytoplankton blooms, and the increased rates of sediment deposition to the bottom by bivalves are an important "coupler" between the water column and the bottom that stimulates the rate of decomposition and other processes in the sediments.


Changes In Thermotolerance And Hsp70 Expression With Domestication In Drosophila Melanogaster, Robert A. Krebs, S. P. Roberts, B. R. Bettencourt, M. E. Feder Aug 2015

Changes In Thermotolerance And Hsp70 Expression With Domestication In Drosophila Melanogaster, Robert A. Krebs, S. P. Roberts, B. R. Bettencourt, M. E. Feder

Robert A. Krebs

To examine how the duration of laboratory domestication may affect Drosophila stocks used in studies of thermotolerance, we measured expression of the inducible heat-shock protein Hsp70 and survival after heat shock in D. melanogaster strains recently collected from nature and maintained in laboratory culture for up to 50 or more generations. After an initial increase in both Hsp70 expression and thermotolerance immediately after transfer to laboratory medium, both traits remained fairly constant over time and variation among strains persisted through laboratory domestication. Furthermore, variation in heat tolerance and Hsp70 expression did not correlate with the length of time populations evolved ...


Community Involvement To Address A Long-Standing Invasive Species Problem: Aspects Of Civic Ecology In Practice, Rebecca W. Dolan, Kelly Harris, Mark Adler Aug 2015

Community Involvement To Address A Long-Standing Invasive Species Problem: Aspects Of Civic Ecology In Practice, Rebecca W. Dolan, Kelly Harris, Mark Adler

Rebecca W. Dolan

Invasive non-native species (INS) are found in every city around the globe, but their impacts in urban settings as biological agents of visual pollution that block views of natural landscapes and disconnect citizens from nature are not as often addressed as comprehensively as their impacts in natural areas or agricultural settings. The multiple impacts of INS in cities make them ideal candidates for aspects of Civic Ecology Practice, where local environmental stewardship action is taken to enhance green infrastructure and community well-being in urban and other human-dominated systems. We present details of a community driven program focused on removal of ...


Pain In Aquatic Animals, Lynne U. Sneddon Aug 2015

Pain In Aquatic Animals, Lynne U. Sneddon

Lynne Sneddon, PhD

Recent developments in the study of pain in animals have demonstrated the potential for pain perception in a variety of wholly aquatic species such as molluscs, crustaceans and fish. This allows us to gain insight into how the ecological pressures and differential life history of living in a watery medium can yield novel data that inform the comparative physiology and evolution of pain. Nociception is the simple detection of potentially painful stimuli usually accompanied by a reflex withdrawal response, and nociceptors have been found in aquatic invertebrates such as the sea slug Aplysia. It would seem adaptive to have a ...


What Do Zebrafish Want? Impact Of Social Grouping, Dominance And Gender On Preference For Enrichment, Paul Schroeder, Soffia Jones, Iain S. Young, Lynne U. Sneddon Aug 2015

What Do Zebrafish Want? Impact Of Social Grouping, Dominance And Gender On Preference For Enrichment, Paul Schroeder, Soffia Jones, Iain S. Young, Lynne U. Sneddon

Lynne Sneddon, PhD

Although environmental enrichment is known to improve laboratory rodent wellbeing and enhance scientific data collection, relatively little is known with regards to the type of enrichment that might be useful for zebrafish (Danio rerio). Therefore, this study explored if zebrafish displayed preferences for a range of enrichments, including substrates, artificial plants, combinations thereof and airstones. Tanks divided into two compartments containing different enrichment cues were used to determine the preferences of zebrafish housed in pairs and groups of eight. When comparing time spent in enriched versus barren compartments, dominant individuals in a pair displayed a preference for substrate and behaviourally ...


Wildlife Of The Gold Coast Wetlands, Shelley Burgin, Daryl Mcphee Aug 2015

Wildlife Of The Gold Coast Wetlands, Shelley Burgin, Daryl Mcphee

Daryl McPhee

Extract: Water in the landscape of the Gold Coast is dominated by marine and marine-influenced systems. The most obvious are the in-shore waters abutting the Gold Coast's world-famous beaches and estuaries. Little more than a glance at a map of the city also reveals the extensive canal estates built to take advantage of the marine waters, and indeed expand them. The waters of the rivers mix with the ocean's waters in the estuaries. These ecosystems are valuable nursery areas for marine wildlife, particularly, but not restricted to, fishes of commercial and recreational value.


Marine Environments Of The Gold Coast: Out With The Old, In With The New, Daryl Mcphee Aug 2015

Marine Environments Of The Gold Coast: Out With The Old, In With The New, Daryl Mcphee

Daryl McPhee

Extract: The marine environments of the Gold Coast comprise one of the most highly modified and heavily utilised waterways in Australia. Chapters 2 and 3 discussed changes in the historic land use patterns. Just what has this meant to the marine environments of the Gold Coast? In this chapter the contemporary marine h abitats of the Gold Coast are described, along with the fauna that those habitats support. We talk about how the current status of the habitats compares with various historical points in time, and the role of novel habitats. Given the impor tance of recreational fishing to both ...


A Brief History Of Discovery, Settlement And Development, Tor Hundloe, Craig Page Aug 2015

A Brief History Of Discovery, Settlement And Development, Tor Hundloe, Craig Page

Tor Hundloe

Extract: If we can rely on anecdotal data, the answers to what is truly Australian will start with mention of the koala, go to kangaroos and then include the rest of Australia's peculiar (to foreigners) fauna. The only exception might be that if we asked a male from the Asian subcontinent (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh) what he identified Australia with, he might answer 'Cricket'. Putting that aside, the Gold Coast is very likely to be in the mix of Australian icons. To capture the essence of the Gold Coast, we need to talk about its history in ...


The Impact On The Gold Coast's Terrestrial Environments, Tor Hundloe Aug 2015

The Impact On The Gold Coast's Terrestrial Environments, Tor Hundloe

Tor Hundloe

Extract: We tend to think of the Gold Coast as a water environment. As tourists know, it sits on the shore of the vast Pacific Ocean. That is why most come. They have seen the magnificent photographs. If not perched on flattened dunes looking east to the ocean, a significant part of the urban Gold Coast environment is located around natural and human-made water environments. Of these we will say little here, other than to note their extent. The focus of this chapter is the city's terrestrial environments, reporting on and ultimately, after describing the environments, discussing what proportion ...


State Of The Environment, Tor Hundloe Aug 2015

State Of The Environment, Tor Hundloe

Tor Hundloe

Extract: What have we done? What have we learned? In this chapter we turn our attention to the people of the Gold Coast and their environmental impacts, as experienced in the 21st century. The past is gone. The damage is done. Dramatic change in landforms and ecological relationships are inevitable in building cities. From this we can only learn and do things better in the future. This is why there will never be another Gold Coast like the one we describe in this book.


Cannibalism Causes Size-Dependent Intraspecific Predation Pressure But Does Not Trigger Autotomy In The Intertidal Gastropod Agaronia Propatula, Ariel Z. Cyrus, Jennifer Swiggs, Pilar Santidrian Tomillo, Frank V. Paladino, Winfried S. Peters Aug 2015

Cannibalism Causes Size-Dependent Intraspecific Predation Pressure But Does Not Trigger Autotomy In The Intertidal Gastropod Agaronia Propatula, Ariel Z. Cyrus, Jennifer Swiggs, Pilar Santidrian Tomillo, Frank V. Paladino, Winfried S. Peters

Winfried S. Peters

Autotomy of the foot is readily inducible in the predatory marine gastropod Agaronia propatula (Conrad, 1849), but the natural trigger of the autotomy response is obscure. Since cannibalistic predation has been observed in the species while interspecific predation on A. propatula has not, it was hypothesized that autotomy in A. propatula helps to defend against cannibalism. This hypothesis was tested in the present study. In our Costa Rican study population, autotomy as well as cannibalism occurred at significant rates; morphological indicators of foot regeneration suggested that 9–23% of the animals had autotomized previously, while about 5% of all observed ...