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Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

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Evaluation Of Two Implants For Steers On Early-Intensively Grazed Tallgrass Native Range, J. K. Farney, M. E. Corrigan Feb 2019

Evaluation Of Two Implants For Steers On Early-Intensively Grazed Tallgrass Native Range, J. K. Farney, M. E. Corrigan

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Objective: To evaluate the effect of two implants that have different lengths of effective use on stocker cattle gains within an intensive early double-stocked native tallgrass prairie grazing system.

Study Description: Stocker steers (n = 281) were implanted with Revalor-G (Merck Animal Health, Madison, NJ) or Synovex One Grass (Zoetis, Inc., Kalamazoo, MI) and grazed on tallgrass native range for 90 days during the summer. The steers were individually weighed, after an overnight shrink, on the day of implanting, at midpoint of grazing, and the end of the grazing period. Total gains and average daily gain were evaluated.

The Bottom Line ...


Including Legumes In Wheat-Bermudagrass Pastures, L. W. Lomas, J. L. Moyer Jan 2019

Including Legumes In Wheat-Bermudagrass Pastures, L. W. Lomas, J. L. Moyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Use of legumes in wheat-bermudagrass pastures did not affect summer cow gains in 2018. Forage availability was greater (P < 0.05) where nitrogen (N) alone was used than where crimson clover and ladino clover were used in the Legume system. Estimated for­age crude protein (CP) was similar (P > 0.05) for the Legume and Nitrogen systems.


Pre-Plant Nitrogen Rate And Application Method And Side-Dress Nitrogen Rate Effects On Corn Grown No-Till On A Claypan Soil, D. W. Sweeney, D. Ruiz-Diaz Jan 2019

Pre-Plant Nitrogen Rate And Application Method And Side-Dress Nitrogen Rate Effects On Corn Grown No-Till On A Claypan Soil, D. W. Sweeney, D. Ruiz-Diaz

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Corn yield in 2018 was increased by about 5 bu/a with knife application of pre-plant nitrogen (N) fertilizer compared with broadcast application. Fertilizing with increasing rates of N applied pre-plant, at side-dress, or both had little effect on yield or yield components of corn in 2018.


Syngenta Enogen Feed Corn Silage Containing An Alpha Amylase Expression Trait Improves Feed Efficiency In Growing Calf Diets, M. A. Johnson, T. Spore, S. P. Montgomery, W. R. Hollenbeck, R. N. Wahl, E. D. Watson, D. A. Blasi Jan 2019

Syngenta Enogen Feed Corn Silage Containing An Alpha Amylase Expression Trait Improves Feed Efficiency In Growing Calf Diets, M. A. Johnson, T. Spore, S. P. Montgomery, W. R. Hollenbeck, R. N. Wahl, E. D. Watson, D. A. Blasi

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Objective: To determine the growing calf response when fed Enogen Feed corn silage containing an alpha amylase expression trait.

Study Description: Crossbred steers of Tennessee origin (n = 352) were used to determine the effects on performance when fed Enogen Feed corn silage with either Enogen Feed corn or control corn at ad libitum intake.

The Bottom Line: When fed in an ad libitum fashion to growing calves, Enogen Feed corn silage improves the efficiency of feed conversion by 4.4% and average daily gain by 6.0%.


Southeast Kansas Crop Production Summary – 2018, G. F. Sassenrath, L. Mengarelli, J. Lingenfelser, X. Lin Jan 2019

Southeast Kansas Crop Production Summary – 2018, G. F. Sassenrath, L. Mengarelli, J. Lingenfelser, X. Lin

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

This is a summary of the crop production conditions in southeast Kansas in 2018, and the results of the variety testing for corn, soybean, sorghum, sunflower, and wheat.


Controlling Soil-Borne Disease In Soybean With A Mustard Cover Crop, G. F. Sassenrath, C. Little, K. Roozeboom, X. Lin, D. Jardine Jan 2019

Controlling Soil-Borne Disease In Soybean With A Mustard Cover Crop, G. F. Sassenrath, C. Little, K. Roozeboom, X. Lin, D. Jardine

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Charcoal rot is a soil-borne disease that is prevalent in southeast Kansas. The disease infects multiple crops, including soybean, and causes yield reductions. A high-gluco­sinolate mustard with biofumigant properties reduced the population levels in soil and in soybean plants of the fungus (Macrophomina phaseolina) that causes charcoal rot. In this study, management practices that incorporate use of mustard as a cover crop in soybean production systems were tested. Results indicate that tillage increases the char­coal rot fungus. The mustard cover crop was tested in field studies for its impact on soil health, fungal disease and propagules, and soybean ...


Southeast Research And Extension Center Agricultural Research 2019, L. W. Lomas Jan 2019

Southeast Research And Extension Center Agricultural Research 2019, L. W. Lomas

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Report on agricultural research performed at Southeast Research and Extension Center. Full book to view.


Trends In “Natural” Value-Added Calf Programs At Superior Livestock Video Auction, K. G. Odde, M. E. King, E. D. Mccabe, M. J. Smith, K. L. Hill, G. M. Rogers, K. E. Fike Jan 2019

Trends In “Natural” Value-Added Calf Programs At Superior Livestock Video Auction, K. G. Odde, M. E. King, E. D. Mccabe, M. J. Smith, K. L. Hill, G. M. Rogers, K. E. Fike

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Objective: This study utilized data from Superior Livestock Video Auction to investigate trends in the use of “natural” value-added calf programs.

Study Description: Nine years of data (2010-2018) were evaluated for enrollment trends in all natural programs and non-hormone treated cattle. Multiple regression was used to determine the relative value of calves enrolled in the non-hormone treated cattle program.

The Bottom Line: Price advantages for non-hormone treated calves may not be sufficient to justify not using growth-promoting implants on calves.


Quality Grade Has No Effect On Top Sirloin Steaks Cooked To Multiple Degrees Of Doneness, B. A. Olson, E. A. Rice, J. M. Gonzalez, J. L. Vipham, M. D. Chao, T. A. Houser, E. A. Boyle, T. G. O'Quinn Jan 2019

Quality Grade Has No Effect On Top Sirloin Steaks Cooked To Multiple Degrees Of Doneness, B. A. Olson, E. A. Rice, J. M. Gonzalez, J. L. Vipham, M. D. Chao, T. A. Houser, E. A. Boyle, T. G. O'Quinn

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of cooking top sirloin steaks from four quality grades to multiple degrees of doneness (rare, medium, well-done) on beef palatability traits.

Study Description: Beef top sirloin butts (n = 60; 15/quality grade) from four U.S. Department of Agriculture quality grades [Prime, Top Choice (Modest and Moderate marbling), Low Choice, and Select] were selected from a Midwest beef processor. Top butts were transported to the Kansas State University Meat Laboratory, fabricated into 1-in steaks, vacuum packaged, and aged for 28 days at 39.2°F. Following aging, steaks were ...


Chef Evaluation Of The Degree Of Doneness Of Beef Strip Loin Steaks Cooked To Six End-Point Temperatures, L. L. Prill, L. N. Drey, J. L. Vipham, M. D. Chao, J. M. Gonzalez, T. A. Houser, E. A. Boyle, T. G. O'Quinn Jan 2019

Chef Evaluation Of The Degree Of Doneness Of Beef Strip Loin Steaks Cooked To Six End-Point Temperatures, L. L. Prill, L. N. Drey, J. L. Vipham, M. D. Chao, J. M. Gonzalez, T. A. Houser, E. A. Boyle, T. G. O'Quinn

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Objective: The objective of this study was to assess foodservice steak preparation practices and chefs’ abilities to identify degrees of doneness of beef strip loin steaks.

Study Description: Beef strip loins (n = 24) from 12 animals representing five quality treatments (Prime, Top Choice, Low Choice, Select, and Select Enhanced) were collected. Steaks were cooked to an end-point temperature of very-rare (130°F), rare (140°F), medium-rare (145°F), medium (160°F), well-done (170°F), or very well-done (180°F). Each cooked steak was cut in half, perpendicular to the long axis of the steak, and photographs were taken immediately of ...


Effect Of Degree Of Doneness, Quality Grade, And Time On Instrumental Color Readings From Beef Strip Loin Steaks Cooked To Six Degrees Of Doneness, L. L. Prill, L. N. Drey, J. L. Vipham, M. D. Chao, J. M. Gonzalez, T. A. Houser, E. A. Boyle, T. G. O'Quinn Jan 2019

Effect Of Degree Of Doneness, Quality Grade, And Time On Instrumental Color Readings From Beef Strip Loin Steaks Cooked To Six Degrees Of Doneness, L. L. Prill, L. N. Drey, J. L. Vipham, M. D. Chao, J. M. Gonzalez, T. A. Houser, E. A. Boyle, T. G. O'Quinn

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of quality grade and time after cooking on the instrumental color of steaks cooked to varying degrees of doneness.

Study Description: Beef strip loins (n = 24) from 12 animals representing five quality treatments [Prime, Top Choice, Low Choice, Select, Select Enhanced (108%)] were collected. Each steak was cooked to a peak internal temperature of very-rare (130°F), rare (140°F), medium-rare (145°F), medium (160°F), well-done (170°F), or very well-done (180°F). Each cooked steak was cut in half, perpendicular to the long axis of the steak ...


Cattlemen's Day 2019, E. A. Boyle Jan 2019

Cattlemen's Day 2019, E. A. Boyle

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Report for 2019 on Kansas beef cattle research, including cattle management, cattle nutrition, and meat science.


Visual Degree Of Doneness Has An Impact On Palatability Ratings Of Consumers Who Had Differing Degree Of Doneness Preferences, L. L. Prill, L. N. Drey, J. L. Vipham, M. D. Chao, J. M. Gonzalez, T. A. Houser, E. A. Boyle, T. G. O'Quinn Jan 2019

Visual Degree Of Doneness Has An Impact On Palatability Ratings Of Consumers Who Had Differing Degree Of Doneness Preferences, L. L. Prill, L. N. Drey, J. L. Vipham, M. D. Chao, J. M. Gonzalez, T. A. Houser, E. A. Boyle, T. G. O'Quinn

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the impact of feeding consumers of varying degree of doneness preferences steaks cooked to multiple degrees of doneness on their perceptions of beef palatability.

Study Description: Paired Low Choice frozen steaks from the posterior half of the strip loin were randomly assigned a degree of doneness of rare (140°F), medium-rare (145°F), medium (160°F), medium-well (165°F), or well-done (170°F). Consumer panelists, prescreened to participate in panels based on their degree of doneness preference, were served steak samples cooked to each of the five degrees of doneness under ...


Consumer Evaluation Of The Degree Of Doneness Of Beef Strip Loin Steaks Cooked To Six End-Point Temperatures, L. L. Prill, L. N. Drey, J. L. Vipham, M. D. Chao, J. M. Gonzalez, T. A. Houser, E. A. Boyle, T. G. O'Quinn Jan 2019

Consumer Evaluation Of The Degree Of Doneness Of Beef Strip Loin Steaks Cooked To Six End-Point Temperatures, L. L. Prill, L. N. Drey, J. L. Vipham, M. D. Chao, J. M. Gonzalez, T. A. Houser, E. A. Boyle, T. G. O'Quinn

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Objective: The objective of this study was to assess consumers’ degree of doneness practices in addition to their ability to identify beef steak degrees of doneness.

Study Description: Beef strip loins (n = 24) from 12 animals representing five quality treatments [Prime, Top Choice, Low Choice, Select, and Select Enhanced (108%)] were collected. Steaks were cooked to an end-point temperature of very-rare (130°F), rare (140°F), medium-rare (145°F), medium (160°F), well-done (170°F), or very well-done (180°F). Cooked steaks were cut in half, perpendicular to the long axis of the steak, and photographs were taken immediately on ...


Acknowledgments, E. A. Boyle Jan 2019

Acknowledgments, E. A. Boyle

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Listed below are individuals, organizations, and firms that have contributed to the beef research program through financial support, product donations, or services.


Effects Of Interseeding Ladino Clover Into Tall Fescue Pastures Of Varying Endophyte Status On Grazing And Subsequent Finishing Performance Of Stocker Steers, L. W. Lomas, J. L. Moyer Jan 2019

Effects Of Interseeding Ladino Clover Into Tall Fescue Pastures Of Varying Endophyte Status On Grazing And Subsequent Finishing Performance Of Stocker Steers, L. W. Lomas, J. L. Moyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

One hundred ninety-two yearling steers grazing tall fescue pastures were used to evalu­ate the effects of fescue cultivar and interseeding ladino clover on available forage, grazing gains, and subsequent finishing performance in 2016, 2017, and 2018. Fescue cultivars evaluated were high-endophyte ‘Kentucky 31,’ low-endophyte Kentucky 31, ‘HM4,’ and ‘MaxQ.’ In 2016 and 2018, steers that grazed pastures of low-endophyte Kentucky 31, HM4, or MaxQ gained significantly more (P < 0.05) and produced more (P < 0.05) gain/a than those that grazed high-endophyte Kentucky 31 pastures. Gains of cattle that grazed low-endophyte Kentucky 31, HM4, or MaxQ were similar (P > 0.05). In 2017, steer gains were similar (P > 0.05) among all cultivars. High-endo­phyte Kentucky 31 pastures had more (P < 0.05) available forage than low-endophyte Kentucky 31, HM4, or MaxQ pastures during both 2016 and 2017. Steer gains and gain/acre were similar (P > 0.05) between pastures fertilized with nitrogen (N) in ...


Effects Of Various Grazing Systems On Grazing And Subsequent Finishing Performance, L. W. Lomas, J. L. Moyer Jan 2019

Effects Of Various Grazing Systems On Grazing And Subsequent Finishing Performance, L. W. Lomas, J. L. Moyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A total of 360 mixed black yearling steers were used to compare grazing and subsequent finishing performance from pastures with ‘MaxQ’ tall fescue, a wheat-bermudagrass double-crop system, or a wheat-crabgrass double-crop system in 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018. Daily gains of steers that grazed MaxQ fescue, wheat-bermudagrass, or wheat-crabgrass were similar (P > 0.05) in 2010, 2016, 2017, and 2018. Daily gains of steers that grazed wheat-bermudagrass or wheat-crabgrass were greater (P > 0.05) than those that grazed MaxQ fescue in 2011 and 2012. Daily gains of steers that grazed wheat-crabgrass were greater (P > 0 ...


Evaluation Of Supplemental Energy Source For Grazing Stocker Cattle, L. W. Lomas, J. K. Farney, J. L. Moyer Jan 2019

Evaluation Of Supplemental Energy Source For Grazing Stocker Cattle, L. W. Lomas, J. K. Farney, J. L. Moyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A total of 180 steers grazing smooth bromegrass pastures were used to evaluate the effects of supplemental energy source on available forage, grazing gains, subsequent finishing gains, and carcass characteristics in 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018. Supple­mentation treatments evaluated were: no supplement, a supplement with starch as the primary source of energy, and a supplement with fat as the primary source of energy. Supplements were formulated to provide the same quantity of protein and energy per head daily. Supplementation with the starch-based or fat-based supplement during the grazing phase resulted in higher (P < 0.05) grazing gains than feeding no supplement during all five years. In 2014, 2016, 2017, and 2018, grazing gains of steers supple­mented with the starch-based or fat-based supplement were similar (P > 0.05). In 2015, steers ...


Evaluating Single And Multi-Species Summer Cover Crops For Biomass Yield, J. K. Farney, G. F. Sassenrath Jan 2019

Evaluating Single And Multi-Species Summer Cover Crops For Biomass Yield, J. K. Farney, G. F. Sassenrath

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Cover crops have multiple benefits to integrated agricultural production systems. How­ever, information is needed on best species and mixes to use. In this one-year study, the single species grass cover crops produced the most biomass. Spring forage peas did not perform well as a summer cover crop, yielding the same biomass as the fallow areas. Adding collards to the mixtures generally reduced total biomass production compared to single species of grasses alone. Total biomass production was affected by the number of plants in the mixture. Yields of grass-only plots were ~868 lb of dry matter (DM) per acre more ...


Cattle Preference For Annual Forages, J. K. Farney Jan 2019

Cattle Preference For Annual Forages, J. K. Farney

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Many plant species that are available to use as cover crops also have potential as for­age for cattle. With this array of options it can be daunting to decide which plants to establish to meet goals as either a cover crop, forage, or for both. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the annual forages fed to cattle in the fall, winter, or sum­mer that cattle preferred. To summarize, grasses were the most highly preferred forage for cattle regardless of grazing period. Low glucosinolate brassicas such as ‘Graza’ forage radish was the most highly preferred brassica ...


Effects Of Supplementation With Corn Or Dried Distillers Grains On Gains Of Heifer Calves Grazing Smooth Bromegrass Pastures, L. W. Lomas, J. L. Moyer Jan 2019

Effects Of Supplementation With Corn Or Dried Distillers Grains On Gains Of Heifer Calves Grazing Smooth Bromegrass Pastures, L. W. Lomas, J. L. Moyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A total of 150 heifer calves grazing smooth bromegrass pastures were used to compare supplementation with 0.5% of body weight per head daily of corn or dried distillers grains (DDG) in 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018. Daily gains of heifers supplement­ed with corn or DDG were similar (P > 0.05) in all years except 2018, when heifers supplemented with DDG had greater (P < 0.05) gains than those supplemented with corn.


Tillage And Nitrogen Placement Effects On Yields In A Short-Season Corn/Wheat/Double-Crop Soybean Rotation, D. W. Sweeney, D. Ruiz-Diaz Jan 2019

Tillage And Nitrogen Placement Effects On Yields In A Short-Season Corn/Wheat/Double-Crop Soybean Rotation, D. W. Sweeney, D. Ruiz-Diaz

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

In 2018, adding nitrogen (N) greatly improved average wheat yields with about a 10% increase with knife compared to broadcast application methods. Even though tillage did not affect wheat yields, soybean yield was about 10% greater with no-till.


Nitrogen Fertilizer Timing And Phosphorus And Potassium Fertilization Rates For Established Endophyte-Free Tall Fescue, D. W. Sweeney, J. K. Farney, J. L. Moyer Jan 2019

Nitrogen Fertilizer Timing And Phosphorus And Potassium Fertilization Rates For Established Endophyte-Free Tall Fescue, D. W. Sweeney, J. K. Farney, J. L. Moyer

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

A tall fescue production study was conducted at two locations, beginning in the fall of 2016 and the fall of 2017. At both sites, phosphorus (P) fertilization rate only affected the spring harvest, with few differences in yield. Applying nitrogen (N) in late fall or late winter resulted in greater spring yields than applying N in spring or not applying N. However, at Site 1 in 2017 fall harvest yields were greater from the spring N applica­tion, but this response was less at Site 2 in 2018. In both years, applying N increased tall fescue yield, but at Site ...


Modeling Wheat Susceptibility To Disease, H. Zhao, G. F. Sassenrath, X. Lin, R. Lollato, E. D. De Wolf Jan 2019

Modeling Wheat Susceptibility To Disease, H. Zhao, G. F. Sassenrath, X. Lin, R. Lollato, E. D. De Wolf

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) or head scab is a disease caused by the soil-borne Fusarium fungus. The disease occurs frequently in southeast Kansas and can result in reduc­tions in wheat yield and quality because of the mycotoxins developed by the fungus. Timely application of fungicides during the heading period of wheat is one option to reduce the fungus and control the infection rate. This study reports our research on use of fungicides to control head scab and improve wheat yield. We developed a model to predict wheat heading date. Accurate knowledge of wheat stage is the first step in ...


Response Of Soybean Grown On A Claypan Soil In Southeastern Kansas To The Residual Of Different Plant Nutrient Sources And Tillage, D. W. Sweeney, P. Barnes, G. Pierzynski Jan 2019

Response Of Soybean Grown On A Claypan Soil In Southeastern Kansas To The Residual Of Different Plant Nutrient Sources And Tillage, D. W. Sweeney, P. Barnes, G. Pierzynski

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

The residual from previous high-rate turkey litter applications, which were based on nitrogen (N) requirements of the previous grain sorghum crop, increased 2018 soybean yield more than that obtained from the residual of phosphorus (P)-based turkey litter applications (low rate), commercial fertilizer, or the control. Even though early soybean growth was sporadically affected by residual treatments, the dry matter production at the R6 growth stage tended to be where the N-based litter was applied.


Use Of A Fungicide To Reduce Stomatal Conductance For Production Of Sweet Corn Planted At Different Populations With Limited Irrigation, D. W. Sweeney, M. B. Kirkham Jan 2019

Use Of A Fungicide To Reduce Stomatal Conductance For Production Of Sweet Corn Planted At Different Populations With Limited Irrigation, D. W. Sweeney, M. B. Kirkham

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Sweet corn in 2018 was affected by irrigation, plant population, and a fungicide applied for stomatal control. Even though measured stomatal conductance was unaffected and no disease pressure was noted, applying fungicide at V6 more than doubled the number of harvested ears per acre and per plant, but an additional application at R1 did not increase harvested ears. Applying 1 inch of irrigation at the VT growth stage resulted in approximately 20% greater number of harvested ears per acre and ears per plant, but did not increase fresh weight. Under these dry conditions, increasing plant population tended to decrease harvested ...


Biomass Production Of Single Species Cover Crop, G. F. Sassenrath, J. K. Farney Jan 2019

Biomass Production Of Single Species Cover Crop, G. F. Sassenrath, J. K. Farney

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Cover crops can benefit agricultural production by improving soil health and productivity, reducing weeds, and providing biomass for grazing. In this one-year study, biomass production was measured in 17 different single species summer cover crops and a fallow control. Overall, grass species produced more biomass than brassicas, with legumes, broadleaves, and fallow yielding intermediate amounts of biomass. Within the grass species, pearl millet, brown midrib (BMR) sorghum, and sorghum sudan produced more biomass than proso millet; German millet and browntop millet had intermediate biomass production. Within the brassicas, both brown and yellow mustards produced more biomass than collards. There was ...


Characterization Of Claypan Soils In Southeastern Kansas, M. A. Mathis Ii, S. E. Tucker-Kulesza, G. F. Sassenrath Jan 2019

Characterization Of Claypan Soils In Southeastern Kansas, M. A. Mathis Ii, S. E. Tucker-Kulesza, G. F. Sassenrath

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Soil erosion reduces topsoil depth. In areas with a claypan, removal of productive topsoil reduces crop yield where the claypan layer is near the surface. The topsoil and claypan layer each have unique characteristics that impact crop production and within-field variability. To better understand these differences, the soil from an area of low crop yield and high crop yield were collected and laboratory tests were performed to determine the soil classification and undrained shear strength. Understanding the soil properties and the interaction between the topsoil and claypan layers may aid in under­standing the process by which topsoil is being ...


Using Cover Crops As An Effective Weed Control Method In Southeast Kansas, L. I. Chism, J. A. Dille, G. F. Sassenrath Jan 2019

Using Cover Crops As An Effective Weed Control Method In Southeast Kansas, L. I. Chism, J. A. Dille, G. F. Sassenrath

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Weed control is important to optimize crop production. This study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of different methods of fall-implemented weed control strategies. These strategies included different cover crop mixes, chemical control, and mechanical control. The cover crop mixes included four different commonly-planted winter cover crops. The chemical control was a fall-applied burndown, and the me­chanical control was vertical tillage. We found cover crop mixes that contained cereal rye provided the most weed control, with the chemical control being a close second. Spring oats die during the winter because of the low temperatures. The three cover crop mixes ...


Corn Planting Date And Depth – Impacts On Yield, G. F. Sassenrath, L. Mengarelli, X. Lin Jan 2019

Corn Planting Date And Depth – Impacts On Yield, G. F. Sassenrath, L. Mengarelli, X. Lin

Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station Research Reports

Corn growth and production is dependent on environmental conditions during the growing season. Optimal corn growth occurs between 50 and 86°F. Early-season soil temperatures may reduce corn emergence. Conversely, later-planted corn may not have adequate moisture for good pollination and grain production. This research tested the impact of planting date and planting depth on corn yield. The yield decreased with later planting dates. Earlier planting dates had better yield at lower planting depths, but yield was reduced at deeper planting depths at later planting.