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Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Novel Habitat Causes A Shift To Diurnal Activity In A Nocturnal Species, J. Sean Doody, Colin R. Mchenry, David Rhind, Simon Clulow Jan 2019

Novel Habitat Causes A Shift To Diurnal Activity In A Nocturnal Species, J. Sean Doody, Colin R. Mchenry, David Rhind, Simon Clulow

Faculty Publications

Plastic responses may allow individuals to survive and reproduce in novel environments, and can facilitate the establishment of viable populations. But can novel environments reveal plasticity by causing a shift in a behavior as fundamental and conspicuous as daily activity? We studied daily activity times near the invasion front of the cane toad (Rhinella marina), an invasive species that has colonized much of northern Australia. Cane toads in Australia are nocturnal, probably because diurnal activity would subject them to intolerably hot and dry conditions in the tropical savannah during the dry season. Our study can demonstrate, however, that upon reaching ...


Claw Morphometrics In Monitor Lizards: Variable Substrate And Habitat Use Correlate To Shape Diversity Within A Predator Guild, Domenic C. D'Amore, Simon Clulow, J. Sean Doody, David Rhind, Colin R. Mchenry Jan 2018

Claw Morphometrics In Monitor Lizards: Variable Substrate And Habitat Use Correlate To Shape Diversity Within A Predator Guild, Domenic C. D'Amore, Simon Clulow, J. Sean Doody, David Rhind, Colin R. Mchenry

Faculty Publications

Numerous studies investigate morphology in the context of habitat, and lizards have received particular attention. Substrate usage is often reflected in the morphology of characters associated with locomotion, and, as a result, claws have become well-studied ecomorphological traits linking the two. The Kimberley predator guild of Western Australia consists of 10 sympatric varanid species. The purpose of this study was to quantify claw size and shape in the guild using geometric morphometrics, and determine whether these features correlated with substrate use and habitat. Each species was assigned a Habitat/substrate group based on the substrate their claws interact with in ...


The Dry Season Shuffle: Gorges Provide Refugia For Animal Communities In Tropical Savannah Ecosystems, J. Sean Doody, Simon Clulow, Geoff Kay, Domenic D'Amore, David Rhind Jan 2015

The Dry Season Shuffle: Gorges Provide Refugia For Animal Communities In Tropical Savannah Ecosystems, J. Sean Doody, Simon Clulow, Geoff Kay, Domenic D'Amore, David Rhind

Faculty Publications

In the wet-dry tropics, animal species face the major challenges of acquiring food, water or shelter during an extended dry season. Although large and conspicuous animals such as ungulates and waterfowl migrate to wetter areas during this time, little is known of how smaller and more cryptic animal species with less mobility meet these challenges. We fenced off the entire entrance of a gorge in the Australian tropical savanna, offering the unique opportunity to determine the composition and seasonal movement patterns of the small vertebrate community. The 1.7 km-long fence was converted to a trapline that was deployed for ...


Sapl Annual Meeting 2012 : Dalliance With Dali's Ants, Deby L. Cassill, Nelson Poynter Memorial Library. Apr 2012

Sapl Annual Meeting 2012 : Dalliance With Dali's Ants, Deby L. Cassill, Nelson Poynter Memorial Library.

Faculty Publications

Speakers: Peter Tush, Curator of Education, Salvador Dali Museum; Deby Cassil, Ph.D. Associate Professor, USFSP.


University Of South Florida St. Petersburg Student Research Journal, Vol. 1, Issue 1, Article 5 : Geometric Probability Of Mating Success For The Greater Short-Nosed Fruit Bat, Cynopterus Sphinx, Krista Ford, Leon Hardy, Deby L. Cassill Feb 2012

University Of South Florida St. Petersburg Student Research Journal, Vol. 1, Issue 1, Article 5 : Geometric Probability Of Mating Success For The Greater Short-Nosed Fruit Bat, Cynopterus Sphinx, Krista Ford, Leon Hardy, Deby L. Cassill

Faculty Publications

In the bat Cynopterus sphinx, the random probability of mating success was calculated to be 4%. A combination of several adaptations dramatically increases their mating success to nearly 100%. First, the male and female hang upside down in a front-to-back mount. From behind, the male positions his penis dorsoventral toward the female's genitalia. The male maintains a tight hold on the female by biting the scruff on her neck and by holding her wings with his thumbs, allowing the pair to move forwards and backwards uninterruptedly and rhythmically. The male inserts the glans of his penis while the female ...


University Of South Florida St. Petersburg Student Research Journal, Vol. 1, Issue 1, Article 3 : Modeling A Molecular Dynamic Simulation Of The Stat3 Monomer, Jessica Ruekberg, Demetrios Kiriopoulos, Kevin Moore, Deby L. Cassill, Leon Hardy Sep 2011

University Of South Florida St. Petersburg Student Research Journal, Vol. 1, Issue 1, Article 3 : Modeling A Molecular Dynamic Simulation Of The Stat3 Monomer, Jessica Ruekberg, Demetrios Kiriopoulos, Kevin Moore, Deby L. Cassill, Leon Hardy

Faculty Publications

STAT3, also known as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, is a DNA transcription enzyme. In mammals including humans, STAT3 regulates the expression of a variety of genes that play a role in embryonic development. Specifically, STAT3 regulates cell division, cell differentiation and cell death (apoptosis). During embryonic development, STAT3 proteins are phosphorylated in a cell's cytoplasm in response to chemical growth factors. Once phosphorylated, STAT3 proteins pair up to form homodimers that act like pliers. STAT3 homodimers are transferred into the cell nucleus, where they bind to DNA to regulate embryonic development. When mutations of the STAT3 ...


Conceptual Model For Thermal Limits On The Distribution Of Reptiles, J. Sean Doody, Jennifer A. Moore Jan 2010

Conceptual Model For Thermal Limits On The Distribution Of Reptiles, J. Sean Doody, Jennifer A. Moore

Faculty Publications

Recent climate change has re-invigorated scientific interest in the dynamics of geographic distributions of organisms. Climate responses and their biogeographical ramifications can be predicted indirectly by studying variation in fitness-related traits across environmental gradients in wide-ranging species. We review evidence for such variation in reptiles. Clinal variation in seasonal timing (onset) of nesting is common but may offer only minor compensation. In contrast, clinal variation in nesting behavior in two wide-ranging species suggests that reptiles can use nest site choice to counter climate differences. We suggest that when range boundaries located at climate extremes are determined by thermal conditions of ...


Survival Of The Misfits : Why Most Sperm Are Duds & Other Interesting Tales Of Evolution, Deby L. Cassill, Nelson Poynter Memorial Library. Feb 2009

Survival Of The Misfits : Why Most Sperm Are Duds & Other Interesting Tales Of Evolution, Deby L. Cassill, Nelson Poynter Memorial Library.

Faculty Publications

Speaker: Dr. Deby Cassill