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University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Education

2015

Special Education and Communication Disorders Faculty Publications

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Rfx Transcription Factors Are Essential For Hearing In Mice, Ran Elkon, Beatrice Milon, Laura Morrison, Manan Shah, Sarath Vijayakumar, Manoj Racherla, Carmen C. Leitch, Lorna Silipino, Shadan Hadi, Michèle Weiss-Gayte, Emmanuèle Barras, Christoph D. Schmid, Aouatef Ait-Lounis, Ashley Barnes, Yang Song, David J. Eisenman, Efrat Eliyahu, Gregory I. Frolenkov, Scott E. Strome, Bénédicte Durand, Norann A. Zaghloul, Sherri M. Jones, Walter Reith, Ronna Hertzano Oct 2015

Rfx Transcription Factors Are Essential For Hearing In Mice, Ran Elkon, Beatrice Milon, Laura Morrison, Manan Shah, Sarath Vijayakumar, Manoj Racherla, Carmen C. Leitch, Lorna Silipino, Shadan Hadi, Michèle Weiss-Gayte, Emmanuèle Barras, Christoph D. Schmid, Aouatef Ait-Lounis, Ashley Barnes, Yang Song, David J. Eisenman, Efrat Eliyahu, Gregory I. Frolenkov, Scott E. Strome, Bénédicte Durand, Norann A. Zaghloul, Sherri M. Jones, Walter Reith, Ronna Hertzano

Special Education and Communication Disorders Faculty Publications

Sensorineural hearing loss is a common and currently irreversible disorder, because mammalian hair cells (HCs) do not regenerate and current stem cell and gene delivery protocols result only in immature HC-like cells. Importantly, although the transcriptional regulators of embryonic HC development have been described, little is known about the postnatal regulators of maturating HCs. Here we apply a cell type-specific functional genomic analysis to the transcriptomes of auditory and vestibular sensory epithelia from early postnatal mice. We identify RFX transcription factors as essential and evolutionarily conserved regulators of the HC-specific transcriptomes, and detect Rfx1,2,3,5 and 7 in ...


Vestibular Dysfunction, Altered Macular Structure And Trait Localization In A/J Inbred Mice, Sarath Vijayakumar, Teresa E. Lever, Jessica Pierce, Xing Zhao, David Bergstrom, Yunxia Wang Lundberg, Timothy A. Jones, Sherri M. Jones Apr 2015

Vestibular Dysfunction, Altered Macular Structure And Trait Localization In A/J Inbred Mice, Sarath Vijayakumar, Teresa E. Lever, Jessica Pierce, Xing Zhao, David Bergstrom, Yunxia Wang Lundberg, Timothy A. Jones, Sherri M. Jones

Special Education and Communication Disorders Faculty Publications

A/J mice develop progressive hearing loss that begins before one month of age and is attributed to cochlear hair cell degeneration. Screening tests indicated this strain also develops early onset vestibular dysfunction and has otoconial deficits. The purpose of this study was to characterize the vestibular dysfunction and macular structural pathology over the lifespan of A/J mice. Vestibular function was measured using linear vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). Macular structural pathology was evaluated using light microscopy, SEM, TEM, confocal microscopy and Western blotting. Individually, vestibular functional deficits in mice ranged from mild to profound. On average, A/J mice ...


Deletion Of Shank1 Has Minimal Effects On The Molecular Composition And Function Of Glutamatergic Afferent Postsynapses In The Mouse Inner Ear, Jeremy P. Braude, Sarath Vijayakumar, Katherine Baumgarner, Rebecca Laurine, Timothy A. Jones, Sherri M. Jones, Sonya J. Pyott Mar 2015

Deletion Of Shank1 Has Minimal Effects On The Molecular Composition And Function Of Glutamatergic Afferent Postsynapses In The Mouse Inner Ear, Jeremy P. Braude, Sarath Vijayakumar, Katherine Baumgarner, Rebecca Laurine, Timothy A. Jones, Sherri M. Jones, Sonya J. Pyott

Special Education and Communication Disorders Faculty Publications

Abstract

Shank proteins (1-3) are considered the master organizers of glutamatergic postsynaptic densities in the central nervous system, and the genetic deletion of either Shank1, 2, or 3 results in altered composition, form, and strength of glutamatergic postsynapses. To investigate the contribution of Shank proteins to glutamatergic afferent synapses of the inner ear and especially cochlea, we used immunofluorescence and quantitative real time PCR to determine the expression of Shank1, 2, and 3 in the cochlea. Because we found evidence for expression of Shank1 but not 2 and 3, we investigated the morphology, composition, and function of afferent postsynaptic densities ...