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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Phosphorylation On Pstp Controls Cell Wall Metabolism And Antibiotic Tolerance In Mycobacterium Smegmatis, Farah Shamma, Kadamba Papavinasasundaram, Aditya Bandekar, Christopher M. Sassetti, Cara C. Boutte Oct 2019

Phosphorylation On Pstp Controls Cell Wall Metabolism And Antibiotic Tolerance In Mycobacterium Smegmatis, Farah Shamma, Kadamba Papavinasasundaram, Aditya Bandekar, Christopher M. Sassetti, Cara C. Boutte

University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

The mycobacterial cell wall is a dynamic structure that protects Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its relatives from environmental stresses. Modulation of cell wall metabolism under stress is thought to be responsible for decreased cell wall permeability and increased tolerance to antibiotics. The signaling pathways that control cell wall metabolism under stress, however, are poorly understood. Here, we examine the signaling capacity of a cell wall master regulator, the Serine Threonine Phosphatase PstP, in the model organism Mycobacterium smegmatis. We studied how interference with a regulatory phosphorylation site on PstP affects growth, cell wall metabolism and antibiotic tolerance. We find that a ...


Exercise Rescues Gene Pathways Involved In Vascular Expansion And Promotes Functional Angiogenesis In Subcutaneous White Adipose Tissue, So Yun Min, Heather Learnard, Shashi Kant, Olga Gaelikman, Raziel Rojas-Rodriguez, Tiffany Desouza, Anand Desai, John F. Keaney Jr., Silvia Corvera, Siobhan M. Craige Apr 2019

Exercise Rescues Gene Pathways Involved In Vascular Expansion And Promotes Functional Angiogenesis In Subcutaneous White Adipose Tissue, So Yun Min, Heather Learnard, Shashi Kant, Olga Gaelikman, Raziel Rojas-Rodriguez, Tiffany Desouza, Anand Desai, John F. Keaney Jr., Silvia Corvera, Siobhan M. Craige

Open Access Articles

Exercise mitigates chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and obesity; however, the molecular mechanisms governing protection from these diseases are not completely understood. Here we demonstrate that exercise rescues metabolically compromised high fat diet (HFD) fed mice, and reprograms subcutaneous white adipose tissue (scWAT). Using transcriptomic profiling, scWAT was analyzed for HFD gene expression changes that were rescued by exercise. Gene networks involved in vascularization were identified as prominent targets of exercise, which led us to investigate the vasculature architecture and endothelial phenotype. Vascular density in scWAT was found to be compromised in HFD, and exercise rescued this defect ...


A Persistence Detector For Metabolic Network Rewiring In An Animal, Jote T. Bulcha, Gabrielle E. Giese, Zulfikar Ali, Yong-Uk Lee, Melissa D. Walker, Amy D. Holdorf, L. Safak Yilmaz, Robert C. Brewster, Albertha J. M. Walhout Jan 2019

A Persistence Detector For Metabolic Network Rewiring In An Animal, Jote T. Bulcha, Gabrielle E. Giese, Zulfikar Ali, Yong-Uk Lee, Melissa D. Walker, Amy D. Holdorf, L. Safak Yilmaz, Robert C. Brewster, Albertha J. M. Walhout

Open Access Articles

Biological systems must possess mechanisms that prevent inappropriate responses to spurious environmental inputs. Caenorhabditis elegans has two breakdown pathways for the short-chain fatty acid propionate: a canonical, vitamin B12-dependent pathway and a propionate shunt that is used when vitamin B12 levels are low. The shunt pathway is kept off when there is sufficient flux through the canonical pathway, likely to avoid generating shunt-specific toxic intermediates. Here, we discovered a transcriptional regulatory circuit that activates shunt gene expression upon propionate buildup. Nuclear hormone receptor 10 (NHR-10) and NHR-68 function together as a "persistence detector" in a type 1, coherent feed-forward loop ...


A Persistence Detector For Metabolic Network Rewiring In An Animal, Jote T. Bulcha, Gabrielle E. Giese, Zulfikar Ali, Yong-Uk Lee, Melissa D. Walker, Amy D. Holdorf, L. Safak Yilmaz, Robert C. Brewster, Albertha J. M. Walhout Aug 2018

A Persistence Detector For Metabolic Network Rewiring In An Animal, Jote T. Bulcha, Gabrielle E. Giese, Zulfikar Ali, Yong-Uk Lee, Melissa D. Walker, Amy D. Holdorf, L. Safak Yilmaz, Robert C. Brewster, Albertha J. M. Walhout

University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

Persistence detection is a mechanism that ensures a physiological output is only executed when the relevant input is sustained. Gene regulatory network circuits known as coherent type 1 feed forward loops (FFLs) with an AND-logic gate have been proposed to generate persistence detection. In such circuits two transcription factors (TFs) are both required to activate target genes and one of the two TFs activates the other. While numerous FFLs have been identified, examples of actual persistence detectors have only been described for bacteria. Here, we discover a transcriptional persistence detector in Caenorhabditis elegans involving the nuclear hormone receptors nhr-10 and ...


Serine-Dependent Sphingolipid Synthesis Is A Metabolic Liability Of Aneuploid Cells, Sunyoung Hwang, H. Tobias Gustafsson, Ciara O'Sullivan, Gianna Bisceglia, Xinhe Huang, Christian Klose, Andrej Schevchenko, Robert C. Dickson, Paola Cavaliere, Noah Dephoure, Eduardo M. Torres Dec 2017

Serine-Dependent Sphingolipid Synthesis Is A Metabolic Liability Of Aneuploid Cells, Sunyoung Hwang, H. Tobias Gustafsson, Ciara O'Sullivan, Gianna Bisceglia, Xinhe Huang, Christian Klose, Andrej Schevchenko, Robert C. Dickson, Paola Cavaliere, Noah Dephoure, Eduardo M. Torres

University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications

Aneuploidy disrupts cellular homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the physiological responses and adaptation to aneuploidy are not well understood. Deciphering these mechanisms is important because aneuploidy is associated with diseases, including intellectual disability and cancer. Although tumors and mammalian aneuploid cells, including several cancer cell lines, show altered levels of sphingolipids, the role of sphingolipids in aneuploidy remains unknown. Here, we show that ceramides and long-chain bases, sphingolipid molecules that slow proliferation and promote survival, are increased by aneuploidy. Sphingolipid levels are tightly linked to serine synthesis, and inhibiting either serine or sphingolipid synthesis can specifically impair the fitness ...


Critical Role For Arginase 2 In Obesity-Associated Pancreatic Cancer, Tamara Zaytouni, Pei-Yun Tsai, Daniel S. Hitchcock, Cory D. Dubois, Elizaveta Freinkman, Lin Lin, Vicente Morales-Oyarvide, Patrick J. Lenehan, Brian M. Wolpin, Mari Mino-Kenudson, Eduardo M. Torres, Nicholas Stylopoulos, Clary B. Clish, Nada Y. Kalaany Aug 2017

Critical Role For Arginase 2 In Obesity-Associated Pancreatic Cancer, Tamara Zaytouni, Pei-Yun Tsai, Daniel S. Hitchcock, Cory D. Dubois, Elizaveta Freinkman, Lin Lin, Vicente Morales-Oyarvide, Patrick J. Lenehan, Brian M. Wolpin, Mari Mino-Kenudson, Eduardo M. Torres, Nicholas Stylopoulos, Clary B. Clish, Nada Y. Kalaany

UMass Metabolic Network Publications

Obesity is an established risk factor for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Despite recent identification of metabolic alterations in this lethal malignancy, the metabolic dependencies of obesity-associated PDA remain unknown. Here we show that obesity-driven PDA exhibits accelerated growth and a striking transcriptional enrichment for pathways regulating nitrogen metabolism. We find that the mitochondrial form of arginase (ARG2), which hydrolyzes arginine into ornithine and urea, is induced upon obesity, and silencing or loss of ARG2 markedly suppresses PDA. In vivo infusion of (15)N-glutamine in obese mouse models of PDA demonstrates enhanced nitrogen flux into the urea cycle and infusion of ...


Alcohol And Cancer: Mechanisms And Therapies, Anuradha Ratna, Pranoti Mandrekar Aug 2017

Alcohol And Cancer: Mechanisms And Therapies, Anuradha Ratna, Pranoti Mandrekar

Open Access Articles

Several scientific and clinical studies have shown an association between chronic alcohol consumption and the occurrence of cancer in humans. The mechanism for alcohol-induced carcinogenesis has not been fully understood, although plausible events include genotoxic effects of acetaldehyde, cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1)-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species, aberrant metabolism of folate and retinoids, increased estrogen, and genetic polymorphisms. Here, we summarize the impact of alcohol drinking on the risk of cancer development and potential underlying molecular mechanisms. The interactions between alcohol abuse, anti-tumor immune response, tumor growth, and metastasis are complex. However, multiple studies have linked the immunosuppressive effects ...


Cancer Metabolism: Fueling More Than Just Growth, Namgyu Lee, Dohoon Kim Dec 2016

Cancer Metabolism: Fueling More Than Just Growth, Namgyu Lee, Dohoon Kim

UMass Metabolic Network Publications

The early landmark discoveries in cancer metabolism research have uncovered metabolic processes that support rapid proliferation, such as aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), glutaminolysis, and increased nucleotide biosynthesis. However, there are limitations to the effectiveness of specifically targeting the metabolic processes which support rapid proliferation. First, as other normal proliferative tissues also share similar metabolic features, they may also be affected by such treatments. Secondly, targeting proliferative metabolism may only target the highly proliferating "bulk tumor" cells and not the slower-growing, clinically relevant cancer stem cell subpopulations which may be required for an effective cure. An emerging body of research indicates ...


Identification Of Essential Metabolic And Genetic Adaptations To The Quiescent State In Mycobacterium Tuberculosis: A Dissertation, Emily S. C. Rittershaus Dec 2016

Identification Of Essential Metabolic And Genetic Adaptations To The Quiescent State In Mycobacterium Tuberculosis: A Dissertation, Emily S. C. Rittershaus

GSBS Dissertations and Theses

Mycobacterium tuberculosis stably adapts to respiratory limited environments by entering into a nongrowing but metabolically active state termed quiescence. This state is inherently tolerant to antibiotics due to a reduction in growth and activity of associated biosynthetic pathways. Understanding the physiology of the quiescent state, therefore, may be useful in developing new strategies to improve drug efficiency. Here, we used an established in vitro model of respiratory stress, hypoxia, to induce quiescence. We utilized metabolomic and genetic approaches to identify essential and active pathways associated with nongrowth. Our metabolomic profile of hypoxic M. tuberculosis revealed an increase in several free ...


Macrophages Are Regulators Of Whole Body Metabolism: A Dissertation, Joseph C. Yawe Oct 2016

Macrophages Are Regulators Of Whole Body Metabolism: A Dissertation, Joseph C. Yawe

GSBS Dissertations and Theses

Obesity is the top risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans. Obese adipose tissue, particularly visceral depots, exhibits an increase in macrophage accumulation and is described as being in a state of chronic low-grade inflammation. It is characterized by the increased expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines produced by both macrophages and adipocytes, and is associated with the development of insulin resistance. Based on these observations, we investigated the potential role of macrophage infiltration on whole body metabolism, using genetic and diet-induced mouse models of obesity.

Using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence imaging we found that ...


Diet-Responsive Gene Networks Rewire Metabolism In The Nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans To Provide Robustness Against Vitamin B12 Deficiency: A Dissertation, Emma Watson Sep 2015

Diet-Responsive Gene Networks Rewire Metabolism In The Nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans To Provide Robustness Against Vitamin B12 Deficiency: A Dissertation, Emma Watson

GSBS Dissertations and Theses

Maintaining cellular homeostasis is a complex task, which involves monitoring energy states and essential nutrients, regulating metabolic fluxes to accommodate energy and biomass needs, and preventing buildup of potentially toxic metabolic intermediates and byproducts. Measures aimed at maintaining a healthy cellular economy inherently depend on the composition of nutrients available to the organism through its diet. We sought to delineate links between dietary composition, metabolic gene regulation, and physiological responses in the model organism C. elegans.

As a soil-dwelling bacterivore, C. elegans encounters diverse bacterial diets. Compared to a diet of E. coli OP50, a diet of Comamonas aquatica accelerates ...


Determination Of Fatty Acid Oxidation And Lipogenesis In Mouse Primary Hepatocytes, Thomas E. Akie, Marcus P. Cooper Aug 2015

Determination Of Fatty Acid Oxidation And Lipogenesis In Mouse Primary Hepatocytes, Thomas E. Akie, Marcus P. Cooper

GSBS Student Publications

Lipid metabolism in liver is complex. In addition to importing and exporting lipid via lipoproteins, hepatocytes can oxidize lipid via fatty acid oxidation, or alternatively, synthesize new lipid via de novo lipogenesis. The net sum of these pathways is dictated by a number of factors, which in certain disease states leads to fatty liver disease. Excess hepatic lipid accumulation is associated with whole body insulin resistance and coronary heart disease. Tools to study lipid metabolism in hepatocytes are useful to understand the role of hepatic lipid metabolism in certain metabolic disorders. In the liver, hepatocytes regulate the breakdown and synthesis ...


Paternal Effects On Metabolism In Mammals: A Dissertation, Jeremy M. Shea Mar 2015

Paternal Effects On Metabolism In Mammals: A Dissertation, Jeremy M. Shea

GSBS Dissertations and Theses

The following work demonstrates that paternal diet controls medically important metabolic phenotypes in offspring. We observe transmission of dietary information to the zygote via sperm, and this information evades reprogramming that typically occurs after fertilization. Cytosine methylation is implicated as a major contributor to meiotic epigenetic inheritance in several transgenerational phenomena. Our extensive characterization of the sperm methylome reveals that diet does not significantly affect methylation patterns. However, we find that extensive epivariability in the sperm epigenome makes important contributions to offspring variation. Importantly, coordinate cytosine methylation and copy number changes over the ribosomal DNA locus contributes to variation in ...


A Novel Membrane Protein Influencing Cell Shape And Multicellular Swarming Of Proteus Mirabilis, Nicole A. Hay, Donald J. Tipper, Daniel Gygi, Colin Hughes Apr 1999

A Novel Membrane Protein Influencing Cell Shape And Multicellular Swarming Of Proteus Mirabilis, Nicole A. Hay, Donald J. Tipper, Daniel Gygi, Colin Hughes

Microbiology and Physiological Systems Publications and Presentations

Swarming in Proteus mirabilis is characterized by the coordinated surface migration of multicellular rafts of highly elongated, hyperflagellated swarm cells. We describe a transposon mutant, MNS185, that was unable to swarm even though vegetative cells retained normal motility and the ability to differentiate into swarm cells. However, these elongated cells were irregularly curved and had variable diameters, suggesting that the migration defect results from the inability of these deformed swarm cells to align into multicellular rafts. The transposon was inserted at codon 196 of a 228-codon gene that lacks recognizable homologs. Multiple copies of the wild-type gene, called ccmA, for ...