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University of Massachusetts Medical School

Cellular and Molecular Physiology

2006

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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Dihydropyridine Receptors And Type 1 Ryanodine Receptors Constitute The Molecular Machinery For Voltage-Induced Ca2+ Release In Nerve Terminals, Valerie De Crescenzo, Kevin E. Fogarty, Ronghua Zhuge, Richard A. Tuft, Lawrence M. Lifshitz, Jeffrey Carmichael, Karl D. Bellve, Stephen P. Baker, Spyros Zissimopoulos, F. Anthony Lai, Jose R. Lemos, John V. Walsh Jr. Jul 2006

Dihydropyridine Receptors And Type 1 Ryanodine Receptors Constitute The Molecular Machinery For Voltage-Induced Ca2+ Release In Nerve Terminals, Valerie De Crescenzo, Kevin E. Fogarty, Ronghua Zhuge, Richard A. Tuft, Lawrence M. Lifshitz, Jeffrey Carmichael, Karl D. Bellve, Stephen P. Baker, Spyros Zissimopoulos, F. Anthony Lai, Jose R. Lemos, John V. Walsh Jr.

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Ca2+ stores were studied in a preparation of freshly dissociated terminals from hypothalamic magnocellular neurons. Depolarization from a holding level of -80 mV in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ elicited Ca2+ release from intraterminal stores, a ryanodine-sensitive process designated as voltage-induced Ca2+ release (VICaR). The release took one of two forms: an increase in the frequency but not the quantal size of Ca2+ syntillas, which are brief, focal Ca2+ transients, or an increase in global [Ca2+]. The present study provides evidence that the sensors of membrane potential for VICaR are dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs). First, over the range of -80 to ...