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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Blacklegged Tick (Ixodes Scapularis) Distribution In Maine, Usa, As Related To Climate Change, White-Tailed Deer, And The Landscape, Susan P. Elias May 2019

Blacklegged Tick (Ixodes Scapularis) Distribution In Maine, Usa, As Related To Climate Change, White-Tailed Deer, And The Landscape, Susan P. Elias

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Lyme disease is caused by the bacterial spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted through the bite of an infected blacklegged (deer) tick (Ixodes scapularis). Geographic invasion of I. scapularis in North America has been attributed to causes including 20th century reforestation and suburbanization, burgeoning populations of the white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) which is the primary reproductive host of I. scapularis, tick-associated non-native plant invasions, and climate change. Maine, USA, is a high Lyme disease incidence state, with a history of increasing I. scapularis abundance and northward range expansion. This thesis addresses the question: “To what extent has the range expansion ...


Modeling Spatiotemporal Variability Of The Bioclimate Envelope Of Homarus Americanus In The Coastal Waters Of Maine And New Hampshire, Kisei Tananka, Yong Chen Feb 2016

Modeling Spatiotemporal Variability Of The Bioclimate Envelope Of Homarus Americanus In The Coastal Waters Of Maine And New Hampshire, Kisei Tananka, Yong Chen

Publications

A bioclimate envelope model was developed to evaluate the potential impacts of climate variability on American lobster (Homarus americanus). Bioclimate envelopes were defined by season-, sex-, and stage- specific Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI) based on (1) bottom temperature, (2) bottom salinity, and (3) depth. The species’ association to each of these three environmental attributes was expressed using Suitability Indices (SIs) calibrated by standardized lobster abundance derived from 14 years of fishery independent survey. A regional ocean model (Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model) was integrated with the HSI to hindcast spatiotemporal variability of bioclimate envelopes for American lobster in coastal waters of ...


Promotingclimate Change Awareness And Adaptive Planning In Atlantic Fisheries Communities Using Dialogue-Based Participatory Vulnerability Analysis, Mapping, And Collaborative Systems Dynamic Modeling, Thomas Webler, Seth Tuler, Esperanza Stancioff, Elizabeth Fly Jan 2015

Promotingclimate Change Awareness And Adaptive Planning In Atlantic Fisheries Communities Using Dialogue-Based Participatory Vulnerability Analysis, Mapping, And Collaborative Systems Dynamic Modeling, Thomas Webler, Seth Tuler, Esperanza Stancioff, Elizabeth Fly

University of Maine Office of Research Administration: Grant Reports

The goals for the proposed project are twofold:

• First, the project will improve understandings of how a changing climate will affect fishing communities’ abilities to maintain marine fisheries and the local economies historically dependent upon them.

• Second, the project will investigate the role of a structured dialogue and participatory modeling process to support decision makers in fishing communities addressing consequences, vulnerabilities, and adaptive strategies in a context of climate stressors.


Forest - Atmosphere Interaction At Howland Forest, David Dail Mar 2014

Forest - Atmosphere Interaction At Howland Forest, David Dail

University of Maine Office of Research Administration: Grant Reports

The overall goal of the proposed work is to understand the various (and interacting) impacts of a changing climate on carbon cycling at the Howland AmeriFlux site, representative of an important component of the North American boreal forest. Our focus is on quantitatively partitioning respiration into aboveground and belowground processes and into autotrophic and heterotrophic processes to better constrain carbon cycle models. Whole-ecosystem flux measurements generally do a poor job of separating photosynthetic uptake from respiration and cannot constrain (or assign) respiration to the different sources within an ecosystem. This partitioning is difficult, but we will take advantage of new ...


Collaborative Research: Globec Pan-Regional Synthesis: End-To-End Energy Budgets In Us-Globec Regions, Andrew C. Thomas Aug 2013

Collaborative Research: Globec Pan-Regional Synthesis: End-To-End Energy Budgets In Us-Globec Regions, Andrew C. Thomas

University of Maine Office of Research Administration: Grant Reports

The research addresses the overarching question: are marine food webs leading to fisheries controlled from the top-down, the bottom up, or a combination of the two? To address this question we will (1) compare end-to-end energy budgets of the 4 US-GLOBEC study regions in the context of top-down v. bottom-up forcing, (2) assess the skills of the regional models in capturing basic material fluxes, (3) extract diagnostics from the regional models that will be used to evaluate the effects of climate change and fishing pressure across GLOBEC regions and (4) develop quantitative methods to compare the diagnostics. The major successes ...


Fisheries Management In A Changing Climate: Lessons From The 2012 Ocean Heat Wave In The Northwest Atlantic., Katherine E. Mills, Andrew Pershing, Curtis J. Brown, Yong Chen, Fu-Sung Chiang, Daniel S. Holland, Sigrid Lehuta, Janet A. Nye, Jenny C. Sun, Andrew C. Thomas, Richard A. Wahle Jun 2013

Fisheries Management In A Changing Climate: Lessons From The 2012 Ocean Heat Wave In The Northwest Atlantic., Katherine E. Mills, Andrew Pershing, Curtis J. Brown, Yong Chen, Fu-Sung Chiang, Daniel S. Holland, Sigrid Lehuta, Janet A. Nye, Jenny C. Sun, Andrew C. Thomas, Richard A. Wahle

Publications

No abstract provided.


El Nin˜O Impact On Mollusk Biomineralization: Implications For Trace Element Proxy Reconstructions And The Paleo-Archeological Record, Alberto Pe´Rez-Huerta, Miguel F. Etayo-Cadavid, C Fred T. Andrus, Teresa E. Jeffries, Clifton Watkins, Shane C. Street, Daniel H. Sandweiss Feb 2013

El Nin˜O Impact On Mollusk Biomineralization: Implications For Trace Element Proxy Reconstructions And The Paleo-Archeological Record, Alberto Pe´Rez-Huerta, Miguel F. Etayo-Cadavid, C Fred T. Andrus, Teresa E. Jeffries, Clifton Watkins, Shane C. Street, Daniel H. Sandweiss

Anthropology Faculty Scholarship

Marine macroinvertebrates are ideal sentinel organisms to monitor rapid environmental changes associated with climatic phenomena. These organisms build up protective exoskeletons incrementally by biologically-controlled mineralization, which is deeply rooted in long-term evolutionary processes. Recent studies relating potential rapid environmental fluctuations to climate change, such as ocean acidification, suggest modifications on carbonate biominerals of marine invertebrates. However, the influence of known, and recurrent, climatic events on these biological processes during active mineralization is still insufficiently understood. Analysis of Peruvian cockles from the 1982–83 large magnitude El Nin˜o event shows significant alterations of the chemico-structure of carbonate biominerals. Here, we ...


The Cc-Bio Project: Studying The Effects Of Climate Change On Quebec Biodiversity, Dominique Berteaux, Sylvie Blois, Jean-François Angers, Joël Bonin, Nicolas Casajus, Marcel Darveau, François Fournier, Murray Humphries, Brian Mcgill, Jacques Larivée, Travis Logan, Patrick Nantel, Catherine Périé, Frédéric Poisson, David Rodrigue, Sébastien Rouleau, Rouleau Siron, Wilfred Thuiller, Luc Vescovi Nov 2010

The Cc-Bio Project: Studying The Effects Of Climate Change On Quebec Biodiversity, Dominique Berteaux, Sylvie Blois, Jean-François Angers, Joël Bonin, Nicolas Casajus, Marcel Darveau, François Fournier, Murray Humphries, Brian Mcgill, Jacques Larivée, Travis Logan, Patrick Nantel, Catherine Périé, Frédéric Poisson, David Rodrigue, Sébastien Rouleau, Rouleau Siron, Wilfred Thuiller, Luc Vescovi

Publications

Anticipating the effects of climate change on biodiversity is now critical for managing wild species and ecosystems. Climate change is a global driver and thus affects biodiversity globally. However, land-use planners and natural resource managers need regional or even local predictions. This provides scientists with formidable challenges given the poor documentation of biodiversity and its complex relationships with climate. We are approaching this problem in Quebec, Canada, through the CC-Bio Project (http://cc‑bio.uqar.ca/), using a boundary organization as a catalyst for team work involving climate modelers, biologists, naturalists, and biodiversity managers. In this paper we present the ...


Collaborative Research: Abandoned Elephant Seal Colonies In Antarctica: Integration Of Genetic, Isotopic, And Geologic Approaches Toward Understanding Holocene Environmental Change, Brenda L. Hall Sep 2009

Collaborative Research: Abandoned Elephant Seal Colonies In Antarctica: Integration Of Genetic, Isotopic, And Geologic Approaches Toward Understanding Holocene Environmental Change, Brenda L. Hall

University of Maine Office of Research Administration: Grant Reports

During previous NSF-sponsored research, the PI's discovered that southern elephant seal colonies once existed along the Victoria Land coast (VLC) of Antarctica, a region where they are no longer observed. Molted seal skin and hair occur along 300 km of coastline, more than 1000 km from any extant colony. The last record of a seal at a former colony site is at ~A.D. 1600. Because abandonment occurred prior to subantarctic sealing, disappearance of the VLC colony probably was due to environmental factors, possibly cooling and encroachment of land-fast, perennial sea ice that made access to haul-out sites difficult ...


U.S.-Korea Cooperative Research: Carbon Monoxide As A Substrate For Microbial Maintenance, Gary M. King Dec 2007

U.S.-Korea Cooperative Research: Carbon Monoxide As A Substrate For Microbial Maintenance, Gary M. King

University of Maine Office of Research Administration: Grant Reports

Bacteria play an important role in the global budget of carbon monoxide (CO). Largely unknown bacterial populations in soils and the water column of aquatic systems oxidize hundreds of teragrams per year, or about 10%-20% of the estimated annual flux to the atmosphere. In spite of their biogeochemical significance, relatively little is known about the identity of CO-oxidizing populations active in situ, their phylogenic and physiological diversity or the importance of CO as substrate for their basic metabolic needs. of CO oxidizers. It is clear that CO at high concentrations (> 1000 ppm) can serve as a sole source of ...


Modeling Bird Species Occurrence In Current And Future Landscapes, Stephen Nicholas Matthews May 2003

Modeling Bird Species Occurrence In Current And Future Landscapes, Stephen Nicholas Matthews

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

With mounting evidence that global temperatures have increased significantly over the last century and the projections of greater changes in climate by the end of this century, understanding the potential consequences of these changes for species is essential to conservation efforts. Here I evaluate the potential response of birds to projected climate change by using regression tree analysis to create models of species distributions under current conditions from Breeding Bird Survey data and then project these models onto General Circulation Model (GCM) scenarios of global climate change. Before modeling species responses to climate change, I selected seventeen bird species to ...


Growth Increment Analysis Of Marine Bivalves From The North, Stephen D. Houk Jan 2002

Growth Increment Analysis Of Marine Bivalves From The North, Stephen D. Houk

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This study aids in developing a sea surface temperature (SST) proxy with monthly temporal resolution using a combination of growth increment and stable isotope analyses of marine bivalves from the north coast of Peru. Faunal assemblages from the Siches and Ostra Base Camp archaeological sites contain shells of warm-tropical mollusks that currently live farther north in Ecuador. The presence of warm-tropical species in these sites and others as far south as 10"s latitude and dating prior to 5730 cal yr B.P. indicates a stable warm-water regime in the eastern tropical Pacific which subsequently changes to a modern temperate-water ...


B846: Growing Season Parameter Reconstructions For New England Using Killing Frost Records, 1697-1947, William R. Baron, David C. Smith Nov 1996

B846: Growing Season Parameter Reconstructions For New England Using Killing Frost Records, 1697-1947, William R. Baron, David C. Smith

Bulletins

In New England, killing frosts in the late spring and early fall mark the limits of the region's growing seasons. Over the years, farmers have tried to anticipate when to plant and when to harvest to safely prevent their crops from experiencing the harmful effects of freezing. As a hedge against failing memory, some farmers kept notes on when killing frosts occurred so that they could more readily calculate in the years to come when to sow and when to reap. Some of these notes have survived and are now preserved in archives and libraries across the region, or ...


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix F: Terrestrial Ecosystem Analysis (Supplement 2), University Of Maine At Orono, Maine, Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, United States Army Engineer Division, New England Division Jan 1981

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix F: Terrestrial Ecosystem Analysis (Supplement 2), University Of Maine At Orono, Maine, Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, United States Army Engineer Division, New England Division

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

The overall study area encompassed the St. John River and its major tributaries; including the Little and Big Black Rivers (and their tributaries); and all lands extending 3.2 km (2 mi) beyond the maximum elevation of thv predicted impoundment of the Dickey Dam (1,560 km ). Research was concentra-ted in a portion of this area roughly bounded on the north by Chimenticook Stream, on the east by the St. John River, on the west by the United States-Canadian border, and on the south by a line drawn east-west through Seven Islands (Figure 1.0-1). Intensive marten studies were restricted ...


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project At Dickey, Maine : Final Environmental Statement, New England Division, United States Army Engineer Division Jan 1981

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project At Dickey, Maine : Final Environmental Statement, New England Division, United States Army Engineer Division

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

This document contains those comments and responses on the Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement. It is a continuation of Volume II published by the Corps in 1978. In addition, it contains reproductions of those letters of comment received on the March 1980 Draft Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Plan, and the responses to these comments.


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project At Dickey, Maine : Final Environmental Statement, Volume 1-4, U. S. Army Engineer Division, New England Jan 1981

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project At Dickey, Maine : Final Environmental Statement, Volume 1-4, U. S. Army Engineer Division, New England

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

The proposed Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project in northern Maine is a multipurpose installation on the St.John River. The combination hydroelectric power and flood control project is located in Aroostook County, Maine, near the Canadian border. The two proposed earth fill dams located at Dickey are 10,200 feet in length with a maximum height of 335 feet. They would impound 7.7 million acre feet of water at a maximum pool elevation 910 feet mean sea level. A second earth filled dam located 11 miles downstream at Lincoln School would serve as a regulatory dam. It would be 2100 ...


Fish And Wildlife Mitigation Report : Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project, Maine, New England Division, Corps Of Engineers, U. S. Army Engineer Division Jan 1980

Fish And Wildlife Mitigation Report : Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project, Maine, New England Division, Corps Of Engineers, U. S. Army Engineer Division

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

The Dickey Lincoln School Lakes Project is a proposed multipurpose project located on the upper reaches of the St. John River in Aroostook County, Maine. Development would consist of two dams with associated reservoirs and hydroelectric generating facilities, five dikes and transmission lines. A more detailed description of the proposed project and its associated impacts is contained within the Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the proposed project.


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix K: Fish & Wildlife Mitigation Plan & Impacts (Revised), New England Division, United States Army Engineer Division Jan 1980

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix K: Fish & Wildlife Mitigation Plan & Impacts (Revised), New England Division, United States Army Engineer Division

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

The proposed plan is comprised of three major segments: terrestrial, fisheries and endangered species. Each segment is essentially a self-contained unit. All costs for the three segments including land acquisition, operation and maintenance and capital equipment, are to be charged to the project and allocated to the project purposes of hydroelectric generation and flood control.


Federal Water Pollution Control Act Section "404" Evaluation For Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes, New England Division, United States Army Engineer Division, United States Army Corps Of Engineers Jan 1980

Federal Water Pollution Control Act Section "404" Evaluation For Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes, New England Division, United States Army Engineer Division, United States Army Corps Of Engineers

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

The purpose of this report is to relate various aspects of the proposed Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Hydroelectric Project to appropriate considerations defined by Section 404 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972.


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Transmission Studies Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix A, United States Department Of Energy Jan 1978

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Transmission Studies Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix A, United States Department Of Energy

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

The U.S. Departments of the Interior and Energy have conducted system planning, location, and environmental studies for the trans-mission facilities required for the Dickey-Lincoln School Hydroelectric Project. These studies of many alternate routes have resulted in iden-tification of a proposed transmission line route, and an environmental impact statement, as required by the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. This report, documenting an early phase of the overall studies, was first published by the Department of the Interior in February 1977. It is being republished as Appendix A to the DOE Environmental Impact Statement for the project.


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Transmission Studies Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix H: Socio-Economic Impact Study, Edward C. Jordan Co., Inc., United States Department Of Energy Jan 1978

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Transmission Studies Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix H: Socio-Economic Impact Study, Edward C. Jordan Co., Inc., United States Department Of Energy

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

The principal objective of this study is to identify the major types and intensity of social and economic impacts anticipated with the proposed pre-construction, construction, operation and maintenance of the Dickey-Lincoln transmission line. In order to address the types of anticipated impacts it was necessary to first develop a socio-economic profile of the affected area.


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Transmission Studies Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix G: Land Use Impact Study, Jordan Gorrill Associates, Edward C. Jordan Co., Inc., United States Department Of Energy Jan 1978

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Transmission Studies Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix G: Land Use Impact Study, Jordan Gorrill Associates, Edward C. Jordan Co., Inc., United States Department Of Energy

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

This report is in partial fulfillment of the requirement of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. It is a study of the existing and proposed land use impacts which would likely occur as a result of construction of the Dickey-Lincoln Transmission Line in con-junction with the Dickey-Lincoln Hydroelectric Project at Lincoln School in Northern Maine. This report is organized and follows basically a topical summary as outlined in the National Environmental Policy Act.


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Transmission Studies Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix F: Geotechnical Impact Study, Jordan Gorrill Associates, Edward C. Jordan Co., Inc., United States Department Of Energy Jan 1978

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Transmission Studies Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix F: Geotechnical Impact Study, Jordan Gorrill Associates, Edward C. Jordan Co., Inc., United States Department Of Energy

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

The U.S. Departments of the Interior and Energy have conducted system planning, location, and environmental studies for the trans-mission facilities required for the Dickey-Lincoln School Hydroelectric project. These studies of many alternate routes have resulted in iden-tification of a proposed transmission line route and an environmental impact statement, as required by the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. This report, one of several prepared under contract to the DOE by various consultants, is published as an appendix to that statement. Appendix F, Geotechnical Impact Study (two volumes, the second being a map volume), documents a study performed by E ...


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix F: Terrestrial Ecosystem Analysis (Supplement), New England Division, United States Army Engineer Division Jan 1978

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix F: Terrestrial Ecosystem Analysis (Supplement), New England Division, United States Army Engineer Division

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

Construction of the proposed Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project in Aroostook County, Maine will result in the isolation of an area of land due to the impoundment behind Dickey Dam. This land area is located between the United States - Canadian border, the Little Black River, the impoundment (elevation = 913 feet), the Big Black River, and the Shields Branch of the Big Black River, and comprises 183,768 acres of land. A previous report (ERT, 1977) determined the forest types within two miles of the impoundment but did not extend to the Canadian border. This report addresses the forest types


Draft Environmental Impact Statement : Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Transmission Project, United States Department Of Energy Jan 1978

Draft Environmental Impact Statement : Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Transmission Project, United States Department Of Energy

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

This draft environmental impact statement (EIS) will describe the environmental impacts of transmission plans of the Department of Energy (DOE) for the proposed Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project. Electric power produced by the project is to be integrated into the New England electric system if the project is constructed.


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix G: Recreation Resources (Revised June 1978), U.S. Army, Corps Of Engineers, New England Division, Northern Maine Regional Planning Commission, Land Use Consultants, Inc. Jan 1978

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix G: Recreation Resources (Revised June 1978), U.S. Army, Corps Of Engineers, New England Division, Northern Maine Regional Planning Commission, Land Use Consultants, Inc.

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

The purpose of this report is to evaluate and describe the existing recreational use and resources of the project area and the encompassing study area and to project the future use of those resources both with and without the Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project. The primary impact area of the proposed project (project area) includes the St. John River watershed upstream of the proposed damsites to the confluence of Nine-mile Brook. The area is bounded by the watershed divide with the Allagash River on the east and the Canadian Border on the west. Major tributaries of the St. John affected by ...


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Transmission Studies Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix I: Visual-Recreation Resources Impact Study, United States Department Of Energy Jan 1978

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Transmission Studies Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix I: Visual-Recreation Resources Impact Study, United States Department Of Energy

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

The U.S. Departments of the Interior and Energy have conducted system planning, location, and environmental studies for the transmission facilities required for the Dickey-Lincoln School Hydroelectric Project. These studies of many alternate routes have resulted in identification of a proposed transmission line route, and an environmental impact statement as required by the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. This report, one of several covering various topical areas, is published as an appendix to that statement.


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix E: Aquatic Ecosystem And Fisheries Studies, Christoipher J. Schmitt, James R. Beltz, Normandeau Associates, Inc., New England Division, United States Army Engineer Division Jan 1977

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix E: Aquatic Ecosystem And Fisheries Studies, Christoipher J. Schmitt, James R. Beltz, Normandeau Associates, Inc., New England Division, United States Army Engineer Division

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

Throughout this report, the following naming conventions will be used: the study area is the region of the Saint John River from Fort Kent to Ninemile Bridge and the drainage areas of all Saint John tributaries between Lincoln School and Ninemile Bridge within the United States, excluding the Allagash River drainage; the Dickey Lake Area is that region which would be inundated by the proposed Dickey Dam and the drainage areas of all rivers and streams (excluding the Saint John River) flowing into that proposed reservoir; the Lincoln School Reservoir area is that region which would be inundated by the ...


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes, Maine, U.S.A. And Quebec, Canada: Design Memorandum No. 5: Water Quality, New England Division, United States Army Corps Of Engineers Jan 1977

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes, Maine, U.S.A. And Quebec, Canada: Design Memorandum No. 5: Water Quality, New England Division, United States Army Corps Of Engineers

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

This design memorandum presents the results of several studies undertaken to provide an understanding of present and potential future water quality conditions within and downstream from Dickey and Lincoln School Lakes in accordance with the requirements of ETL 1110-2-1402, dated 12 November 1976. Included are an examination of baseline water quality conditions and the findings of qualitative and quantitative predictive analyses performed to evaluate water quality conditions during all phases of the project's lifetime. This document will also serve as a reference for the water quality portions of the project Environmental Impact Statement.


Transmission Reconnaissance Study : Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project, United States Department Of Interior Jan 1977

Transmission Reconnaissance Study : Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project, United States Department Of Interior

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

Two dams are proposed on the St. John River in northern Maine: Dickey, a high earth filled dam immediately above the confluence of the Allagash with the St. John, will have an installed generating capacity of 760 MW; and Lincoln School Dam, 11 miles downstream, a capacity of 70 MW. These dams are scheduled for completion during the mid 1980's. The U.S. Corps of Engineers, New England Division, has been allocated funds to design the project and prepare their own environmental impact statement. This report (Transmission Reconnaissance Studies) discusses alternative transmission facilities needed to connect the project with ...