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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Citizen Science Sensor Development - Smap | Soil Moisture Active Passive, Hagop Hovhannesian Aug 2016

Citizen Science Sensor Development - Smap | Soil Moisture Active Passive, Hagop Hovhannesian

STAR (STEM Teacher and Researcher) Presentations

“Detailed monitoring of soil moisture provides a view of how our whole Earth system works.”

The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite mission was launched in January 2015; its main purpose is to acquire global measurements of soil moisture. SMAP partnered with the GLOBE program (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment), which is an international program where students collect environmental variables in a scientifically methodical way. SMAP readings and maps have various uses in various fields, which include monitoring drought, predicting floods, assisting in crop productivity, and linking water, energy and carbon cycles. The goal of this project ...


Salinity And Temperature Distribution Of Jellyfish In The San Francisco Estuary, Trisha Huynh, Brooke Bemowski, Lindsay Sullivan, Wim Kimmerer Aug 2014

Salinity And Temperature Distribution Of Jellyfish In The San Francisco Estuary, Trisha Huynh, Brooke Bemowski, Lindsay Sullivan, Wim Kimmerer

STAR (STEM Teacher and Researcher) Presentations

Jellyfish are generally characterized by their jelly-like bodies and internal lining (two tissue layers). They found both in the phylum Ctenophora and the phylum Cnidaria. Ctenophores differ from cnidarians primarily due to the rows of “combs”, or cilia, which are used for transportation. Additionally, ctenophores possess sticky cells while cindarians possess stinging cells. Jellyfish depend on zooplankton (small floating aquatic animals) as a food source; as a result, they are potential competitors and predators to plankton-eating fish and may negatively impact fish populations.

As recently as 1950, jellyfish have entered the San Francisco Bay from the Mediterranean Sea (probably in ...


Temperature Effects On Metabolic Rate Of Juvenile Pacific Bluefin Tuna Thunnus Orientalis, Jason M. Blank, Jeffery M. Morrissette, Charles J. Farwell, Mathew Price, Robert J. Schallert, Barbara A. Block Nov 2007

Temperature Effects On Metabolic Rate Of Juvenile Pacific Bluefin Tuna Thunnus Orientalis, Jason M. Blank, Jeffery M. Morrissette, Charles J. Farwell, Mathew Price, Robert J. Schallert, Barbara A. Block

Biological Sciences

Pacific bluefin tuna inhabit a wide range of thermal environments across the Pacific ocean. To examine how metabolism varies across this thermal range, we studied the effect of ambient water temperature on metabolic rate of juvenile Pacific bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, swimming in a swim tunnel. Rate of oxygen consumption (MO2) was measured at ambient temperatures of 8–25°C and swimming speeds of 0.75–1.75 body lengths (BL) s–1. Pacific bluefin swimming at 1 BL s–1 per second exhibited a U-shaped curve of metabolic rate vs ambient temperature, with a thermal minimum zone ...


In Situ Cardiac Performance Of Pacific Bluefin Tuna Hearts In Response To Acute Temperature Change, Jason M. Blank, Jeffery M. Morrissette, Ana M. Landeira-Fernandez, Susanna B. Blackwell, Thomas D. Williams, Barbara A. Block Feb 2004

In Situ Cardiac Performance Of Pacific Bluefin Tuna Hearts In Response To Acute Temperature Change, Jason M. Blank, Jeffery M. Morrissette, Ana M. Landeira-Fernandez, Susanna B. Blackwell, Thomas D. Williams, Barbara A. Block

Biological Sciences

This study reports the cardiovascular physiology of the Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis) in an in situ heart preparation. The performance of the Pacific bluefin tuna heart was examined at temperatures from 30°C down to 2°C. Heart rates ranged from 156 beats min–1 at 30°C to 13 beats min–1 at 2°C. Maximal stroke volumes were 1.1 ml kg–1 at 25°C and 1.3 ml kg–1 at 2°C. Maximal cardiac outputs were 18.1 ml kg–1 min–1 at 2°C and 106 ml kg–1 min–1 at ...


Effects Of Temperature, Epinephrine And Ca2+ On The Hearts Of Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus Albacares), Jason M. Blank, Jeffery M. Morrissette, Peter S. Davie, Barbara A. Block Jul 2002

Effects Of Temperature, Epinephrine And Ca2+ On The Hearts Of Yellowfin Tuna (Thunnus Albacares), Jason M. Blank, Jeffery M. Morrissette, Peter S. Davie, Barbara A. Block

Biological Sciences

Tuna are endothermic fish with high metabolic rates, cardiac outputs and aerobic capacities. While tuna warm their skeletal muscle, viscera, brain and eyes, their hearts remain near ambient temperature, raising the possibility that cardiac performance may limit their thermal niches. We used an in situ perfused heart preparation to investigate the effects of acute temperature change and the effects of epinephrine and extracellular Ca2+ on cardiac function in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares). Heart rate showed a strong temperature-dependence, ranging from 20 beats min-1 at 10 °C to 109 beats min-1 at 25 °C. Maximal stroke volume showed ...