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California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

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Photosynthesis

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Does The Production Of Isoprene Affect The Productivity Of Poplars?, Erik J. Mcfarland, Elizabeth Ann Parra, Greg Barron-Gafford, Rebecca Larkin Minor, Maggie Heard Jan 2015

Does The Production Of Isoprene Affect The Productivity Of Poplars?, Erik J. Mcfarland, Elizabeth Ann Parra, Greg Barron-Gafford, Rebecca Larkin Minor, Maggie Heard

STAR (STEM Teacher and Researcher) Presentations

Poplar trees are known to produce a chemical called isoprene that plays a complex, and not fully understood, role in the chemical process of photosynthesis. Understanding why plants produce isoprene and under what conditions will help scientists make more accurate predictions about poplars’ photosynthetic capabilities in future climates.

What benefit could isoprene provide a plant? The literature suggests its production could help plants tolerate heat stress. We studied two genetic lines of trees in a common garden of Populus, one line with the gene for producing isoprene and a second line without that gene. We subjected some trees of each ...


Genome Size Scaling Through Phenotype Space, Charles A. Knight, Jeremy M. Beaulieu Apr 2008

Genome Size Scaling Through Phenotype Space, Charles A. Knight, Jeremy M. Beaulieu

Biological Sciences

Background and Aims Early observations that genome size was positively correlated with cell size formed the basis of hypothesized consequences of genome size variation at higher phenotypic scales. This scaling was supported by several studies showing a positive relationship between genome size and seed mass, and various metrics of growth and leaf morphology. However, many of these studies were undertaken with limited species sets, and often performed within a single genus. Here we seek to generalize the relationship between genome size and the phenotype by examining eight phenotypic traits using large cross-species comparisons involving diverse assemblages of angiosperm and gymnosperm ...


Genome Size Evolution In Relation To Leaf Strategy And Metabolic Rates Revisited, Jeremy M. Beaulieu, Ilia J. Leitch, Charles A. Knight Mar 2007

Genome Size Evolution In Relation To Leaf Strategy And Metabolic Rates Revisited, Jeremy M. Beaulieu, Ilia J. Leitch, Charles A. Knight

Biological Sciences

Background and AimsIt has been proposed that having too much DNA may carry physiological consequences for plants. The strong correlation between DNA content, cell size and cell division rate could lead to predictable morphological variation in plants, including a negative relationship with leaf mass per unit area (LMA). In addition, the possible increased demand for resources in species with high DNA content may have downstream effects on maximal metabolic efficiency, including decreased metabolic rates.

MethodsTests were made for genome size-dependent variation in LMA and metabolic rates (mass-based photosynthetic rate and dark respiration rate) using our own measurements and ...


Small Heat Shock Protein Responses Of A Closely Related Pair Of Desert And Coastal Encelia, Charles A. Knight, David D. Ackerly Jan 2003

Small Heat Shock Protein Responses Of A Closely Related Pair Of Desert And Coastal Encelia, Charles A. Knight, David D. Ackerly

Biological Sciences

Evolutionary variation for accumulation of small heat shock protein (sHsp) may contribute to thermal niche differentiation between species. Here we examine temperature and time-course-dependent variation for sHsp accumulation in a recently diverged pair of Encelia raised in a common environment: Encelia farinosa, common in the Mojave desert, and Encelia californica, which is found along the cool coastal bluffs of southern North America. Both species exhibit peak sHsp accumulation at 42oC. Encelia californica accumulated greater levels of sHsp at temperatures below 42oC, while E. farinosa had greater levels above 42oC. Encelia farinosa accumulates sHsp at ...