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California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

Series

Exercise

Kinesiology

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Impact Of Metformin On Peak Aerobic Capacity, Barry Braun, Pamela Eze, Brooke R. Stephens, Todd A. Hagobian, Carrie G. Sharoff, Stuart R. Chipkin, Benjamin Goldstein Feb 2008

Impact Of Metformin On Peak Aerobic Capacity, Barry Braun, Pamela Eze, Brooke R. Stephens, Todd A. Hagobian, Carrie G. Sharoff, Stuart R. Chipkin, Benjamin Goldstein

Kinesiology

Individually, exercise and the drug metformin have been shown to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. Metformin mildly inhibits complex I of the electron transport system and may impact aerobic capacity in people exercising while taking metformin. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of metformin on maximal aerobic capacity in healthy individuals without mitochondrial dysfunction. Seventeen healthy, normal-weight men (n=11) and women (n=6) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Peak aerobic capacity was measured twice using a continuous, incrementally graded protocol; once after 7-9 d of metformin (final dose=2000 mg/d) and ...


The Role Of Adherence In Mediating The Relationship Between Depression And Health Outcomes, Rena R. Wing, Suzanne Phelan, Deborah Tate Oct 2002

The Role Of Adherence In Mediating The Relationship Between Depression And Health Outcomes, Rena R. Wing, Suzanne Phelan, Deborah Tate

Kinesiology

Depression has been linked to poor health outcome in a number of studies; however, the mechanism underlying this relationship has received little attention. This paper explores the possibility that adherence mediates the relationship between depression and outcome. Principal findings regarding the relationship between depression, adherence, and outcome are reviewed. The data suggest that depression is related, at least moderately, to poorer adherence to a variety of treatment components. The relationship between adherence and outcome is more difficult to establish. In addition, current data, albeit limited, do not support the hypothesis that adherence mediates the relationship between depression and outcome. An ...