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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Studying The Effects Of Serpentine Soil On Adapted And Non-Adapted Species Using Arduino Technology, Kiana Saniee, Edward Himelblau, Brian Paavo Oct 2016

Studying The Effects Of Serpentine Soil On Adapted And Non-Adapted Species Using Arduino Technology, Kiana Saniee, Edward Himelblau, Brian Paavo

STAR (STEM Teacher and Researcher) Presentations

Abstract: Serpentine soils are formed from ultramafic rocks and are represent an extreme environment for plants. Serpentine soils are unique in that they carry high concentrations of heavy metals, are nutrient deficient, particularly in calcium, and have poor water retention capabilities. Although these soils constitute harsh conditions for plant growth, there are a number of species that are adapted and even endemic to serpentine soil. Water retention by commercial potting mix was compared with serpentine soil. Also, serpentine adapted and non-adapted species were grown in both soil treatments and physiological data were collected. We used the Arduino electronic platform to ...


Optimization Of A Genomic Editing System Using Crispr/Cas9-Induced Site-Specific Gene Integration, Jillian L. Mccool Ms., Nick Hum, Gabriela G. Loots Aug 2016

Optimization Of A Genomic Editing System Using Crispr/Cas9-Induced Site-Specific Gene Integration, Jillian L. Mccool Ms., Nick Hum, Gabriela G. Loots

STAR (STEM Teacher and Researcher) Presentations

The CRISPR-Cas system is an adaptive immune system found in bacteria which helps protect against the invasion of other microorganisms. This system induces double stranded breaks at precise genomic loci (1) in which repairs are initiated and insertions of a target are completed in the process. This mechanism can be used in eukaryotic cells in combination with sgRNAs (1) as a tool for genome editing. By using this CRISPR-Cas system, in addition to the “safe harbor locus,” ROSAβ26, the incorporation of a target gene into a site that is not susceptible to gene silencing effects can be achieved through few ...


Effects Of Soil Erosion Barriers On Percent Cover And Sediment Size, Michael Perez Aug 2016

Effects Of Soil Erosion Barriers On Percent Cover And Sediment Size, Michael Perez

STAR (STEM Teacher and Researcher) Presentations

Ranching began on Santa Rosa Island in the 1840’s, introducing nonnative megafauna that put selective grazing pressures on endemic species. Dense groves of island oak (Q. tomentella) are aid in sediment deposition and retention. A current restoration effort, involved installing soil erosion barriers, known as wattles, to prevent sediment from being lost upslope and recruit plant growth whose root systems could further stabilize the slope. This experiment was designed to compare percent cover of vegetation growth in areas with and without soil erosion barriers. This was done using the line intercept method (n=42) on three meter transects, measuring ...


Reproductive Biology And Search Behavior Of Amitus Bennetti (Hymenoptera: Platygasteridae), A Parasitoid Of Bemisia Argentifolii (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae), Andrea L. Joyce, Thomas S. Bellows, Jr., David H. Headrick Jan 1999

Reproductive Biology And Search Behavior Of Amitus Bennetti (Hymenoptera: Platygasteridae), A Parasitoid Of Bemisia Argentifolii (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae), Andrea L. Joyce, Thomas S. Bellows, Jr., David H. Headrick

Horticulture and Crop Science

No abstract provided.


Life History And Description Of Immature Stages Of Euaresta Stigmatica (Diptera: Tephritidae) On Ambrosia Spp. (Asteraceae) In Southern California, David H. Headrick, Richard D. Goeden, Jeffrey A. Teerink Jan 1995

Life History And Description Of Immature Stages Of Euaresta Stigmatica (Diptera: Tephritidae) On Ambrosia Spp. (Asteraceae) In Southern California, David H. Headrick, Richard D. Goeden, Jeffrey A. Teerink

Horticulture and Crop Science

Euaresta stigmatica Coquillett is bivoltine and nearly monophagous on four native ragweeds, Ambrosia spp. (Asteraceae), in the southwestern United States. In southern California, larvae of the spring (F1) generation develop singly in and feed on one or both ovules of young fruiting involucres of Ambrosia ilicifolia (Gray) Payne, with a small proportion infesting the staminate involucres. Adults emerge after ≈1 mo, with their reproductive organs immature. The F2 generation develops in the involucres of fall-blooming Ambrosia acanthicarpa Hooker. The egg is described and illustrated for the first time for any species of Euaresta. First, second, and third instars ...


Life History And Descriptions Of Immature Stages Of Tephritis Baccharis (Coquillett) On Baccharis Salicifolia (Ruiz & Pavon) Persoon In Southern California (Diptera: Tephritidae), Richard D. Goeden, David H. Headrick Jan 1991

Life History And Descriptions Of Immature Stages Of Tephritis Baccharis (Coquillett) On Baccharis Salicifolia (Ruiz & Pavon) Persoon In Southern California (Diptera: Tephritidae), Richard D. Goeden, David H. Headrick

Horticulture and Crop Science

Tephritis baccharis (Coquillett) is bivoltine and monophagous on Baccharis salicifolia(Ruiz & Pavon) Persoon in southern California. The egg, the second and third instar larvae, and puparium are described and illustrated. Eggs are inserted singly into terminal buds of main and axillary branches in late winter or early spring. First instar larvae hatch and tunnel into the pith just basad to the apical bud where they initiate gall formation. Gall and larval growth continue slowly into the fall, when pupation occurs. Most F1 flies emerge, mate, and after about one week begin oviposition. Some F1 flies that emerge in the fall may overwinter as adults; however, a few F1 individuals may not emerge and instead overwinter as pupae in puparia in mature galls. Second and third instar, F2 larvae also overwinter in developing galls. Flies were long-lived under laboratory conditions; males and females lived an average of 140 days and 83 days, respectively. This longevity and the long fecundity period of females allow T. baccharis to attack the new buds and branch growth produced by B. salicifolia, because this phraetophyte is capable of protracted, nearly year-round vegetative growth and flowering in southern ...