Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Life Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Diversity And Production Of Herbaceous Vegetation In A Northern Utah Subalpine Chronosequence, Gary A. Reese May 1981

Diversity And Production Of Herbaceous Vegetation In A Northern Utah Subalpine Chronosequence, Gary A. Reese

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Successional trends in herbaceous plant production and diversity were studied in an age sequence of sites, i.e. chronosequence, inferred to represent a meadow to aspen to fir to spruce-fir sere. Primary production was observed to decrease in a linear fashion with successional development. Three components of diversity; richness, heterogeneity, and equitability or evenness, each had low early successional values, reaching maximum diversity in mid-succession, and declining to intermediate levels with maturity. The magnitude of these trends varied greatly, depending on the methods used to determine plant dominance. Characteristics of various dominance indices and their applicability to this study were ...


Economic Analysis Of Long-Term Management Strategies For Two Sizes Of Utah Cattle Ranches, Roger E. Banner May 1981

Economic Analysis Of Long-Term Management Strategies For Two Sizes Of Utah Cattle Ranches, Roger E. Banner

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Utah cattle ranchers realize relatively little profit from ranch ownership and management. This study represents an attempt to identify ranch management strategies that produce more profit over time than do conventional strategies. To identify optimum management strategies for the long term, analyses of ranches under both normal and adverse ranch operation conditions using the COPLAN linear programming model were made for strategy comparison. To depict these ranch business environmental conditions, production levels were estimated from available biological data and price levels were estimated by indexing 1977 ranch product prices (the most current budget data available for Utah). The variability of ...


An Economic Analysis Of Farm Flock Sheep Production In Utah, Ken Beck May 1981

An Economic Analysis Of Farm Flock Sheep Production In Utah, Ken Beck

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the economic aspects of farm flock sheep production in Utah. Using 1979 as a base year, costs and returns were calculated from data obtained from twenty- six Utah farms. Characteristics that typify the statesĀ· farm flock sheep production, at this writing, with regard to: 1) the farm flock producers and 2) the farm flock enterprise, were presented.

Various models were dev eloped and examined using Multiple Regression and Linear Programming analytical techniques. Multiple Regression was us ed to estimate the effects that different variables had on the profitability of the sheep enterprise ...


The Economic Impact Of Potential Changes In Federal Grazing Policies On Ranchers In Wayne County, Utah, Kib Elden Jacobson May 1981

The Economic Impact Of Potential Changes In Federal Grazing Policies On Ranchers In Wayne County, Utah, Kib Elden Jacobson

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The purpose of this study was to select an area in Utah that was predominantly livestock oriented which used federal lands for livestock grazing, and to develop model ranches exemplifying the typical live-stock operation in the area. These model ranches were then used in a Budget Generator Program (BG) and a Linear Programming framework (LP) to simulate reductions of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% reductions of BLM land usage. The results were then used to determine income changes, herd size changes, and resource usage in the models as the reductions took place.

The area chosen was Wayne County, Utah because ...


The Energy Expenditure Of Heifers Grazing Crested Wheatgrass Rangeland In West-Central Utah, Kris M. Havstad May 1981

The Energy Expenditure Of Heifers Grazing Crested Wheatgrass Rangeland In West-Central Utah, Kris M. Havstad

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The free-roaming ruminant requires energy for the demands of vii grazing, traveling and thermoregulation that are not required by its confined counterpart. Literature estimates of these additional costs range from 10 to 170 percent above maintenance. The uncertain magnitude of this increased demand and the factors that contribute to it impede the ability of the rangeland ruminant nutritionist to establish guidelines for the energy requirements of the free-roaming herbivore. This study was designed to estimate the energy expenditure of yearling Angus heifers while grazing a declining supply of available crested wheatgrass forage (Agropyron cristatum) on rangeland in west-central Utah.

Free-ranging ...