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Theses/Dissertations

2013

Biology

Western University

Siderophore

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Iron-Regulated Cyanobacterial Predominance And Siderophore Production In Oligotrophic Freshwater Lakes, Ryan J. Sorichetti Nov 2013

Iron-Regulated Cyanobacterial Predominance And Siderophore Production In Oligotrophic Freshwater Lakes, Ryan J. Sorichetti

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

The frequency and intensity of cyanobacterial blooms (cyanoblooms) is increasing globally. Contrary to existing phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) paradigms describing cyanobloom proliferation in eutrophic (nutrient-rich) freshwater lakes, many of the recent cyanobloom reports pertain to oligotrophic (nutrient-poor) freshwater lakes with no prior history of cyanobloom occurrence. There exists a critical research need to re-visit existing conceptual models, identify regulating factors currently unaccounted for and improve our ability to effectively detect and measure cyanobacterial toxins (cyanotoxins) in lakes. Iron (Fe) is required in nearly all pathways of cyanobacterial macronutrient use, though its direct role in regulating cyanobacterial biomass is not ...


Cyanobacteria Predominance In Alberta's Eutrophic Lakes Linked To Iron Scavenging Strategy That Uses Siderophores And Toxins, Xue L. Du Aug 2013

Cyanobacteria Predominance In Alberta's Eutrophic Lakes Linked To Iron Scavenging Strategy That Uses Siderophores And Toxins, Xue L. Du

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

The role of the micronutrient iron in the regulation of cyanobacteria dominance and cyanotoxicity is poorly understood. Iron is required for important metabolic pathways, including both phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) assimilation, and low levels of this element may influence the assimilation of the macronutrients. The hypothesis tested was that cyanobacteria produce and utilize siderophores and toxins in low iron conditions to scavenge iron, when P and N are not limiting algal growth, providing some cyanobacteria with a competitive advantage over other algal species. Among the naturally eutrophic lakes studied, cyanobacteria were dominant at low iron (>pFe19) concentrations (Spearman r ...