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Full-Text Articles in Life Sciences

Properties Of Potential Substrates Of A Cyanobacterial Small Heat Shock Protein, Yichen Zhang Nov 2014

Properties Of Potential Substrates Of A Cyanobacterial Small Heat Shock Protein, Yichen Zhang

Masters Theses

Most proteins must fold into native three-dimensional structures to be functional. But, newly synthesized proteins are at high risk of misfolding and aggregating in the cell. Stress, disease or mutations can also cause protein aggregation. A cyanobacterial small heat shock protein, Hsp16.6, can act as a chaperone to prevent irreversible protein aggregation during heat stress. This thesis is focused on the properties of proteins that were associated with Hsp16.6 during heat stress, and which therefore may be “substrates” of Hsp16.6. Bioinformatics were used to determine if Hsp16.6 preferentially binds to proteins with certain properties, and biochemical ...


Expression And Purification Of Human Lysosomal Β-Galactosidase From Pichia Pastoris, Sarah E. Tarullo Nov 2014

Expression And Purification Of Human Lysosomal Β-Galactosidase From Pichia Pastoris, Sarah E. Tarullo

Masters Theses

Lysosomal storage diseases are genetically inherited diseases caused by the dysfunction of lysosomal enzymes. In a normal cell, lysosomal enzymes cleave specific macromolecules as they are transported to the lysosome. However, in diseased cells, these lysosomal enzymes are either absent or malfunctioning, causing macromolecular substrates to accumulate, becoming toxic to the cell. Over fifty lysosomal storage diseases have been identified, collectively occurring in one out of 7,700 live births. We investigated the lysosomal enzyme β-galactosidase (β-gal). In order to study the biochemistry and enzymology of this protein a robust expression system was needed. The GLB1 gene has been inserted ...


Sequence Analysis Of Maize Yellow Stripe3 Candidate Genes, Dennis B. Depaolo Nov 2014

Sequence Analysis Of Maize Yellow Stripe3 Candidate Genes, Dennis B. Depaolo

Masters Theses

The work presented here focuses on the molecular mechanism of phytosiderophore secretion in graminaceous plants. In maize, yellow stripe3 (ys3) is a mutant that is deficient in its ability to secrete iron-chelating compounds of the mugineic acid family known as phytosiderophores. Phytosiderophores are specific to grasses and are used for the acquisition of iron. Genetic linkage mapping of the ys3 locus lead to a region of interest on chromosome 3 defined by marker UMC1773. The sequence of eleven candidate genes (GRMZM2G390345, GRMZM2G390374, GRMZM2G342821, GRMZM5G800764, GRMZM2G502560, GRMZM5G849435, GRMZM2G105766, GRMZM5G876835, GRMZM2G036976, GRMZM2G502563, miR167g) revealed several small deletions and point mutations within the ...


Designing A Pore-Forming Toxin Cytolysin A (Clya) Specific To Target Cancer Cells, Alzira Rocheteau Avelino Nov 2014

Designing A Pore-Forming Toxin Cytolysin A (Clya) Specific To Target Cancer Cells, Alzira Rocheteau Avelino

Masters Theses

Cytolysin A (ClyA) is a member of a class of proteins called pore-forming toxins (PFTs). ClyA is secreted by Gram-negative bacteria, and it attacks a number of mammalian cells by inserting into and forming channels within the cell membrane (Oscarsson J et al., 1999). It has been suggested that ClyA binds to cholesterol (Oscarsson J et al., 1999) and thus can insert into the membranes of many different cell types of eukaryotic origin. In our studies we propose to engineer a ClyA protein that can only attack a small subset of cell types. We propose to engineer ClyA that can ...